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National Inventory Report 1990-2012: Greenhouse Gas Sources and Sinks in Canada - Executive Summary

ES.4 Economic Sectors

As previously noted, there are several methods to categorize the sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that arise across Canada. For the purposes of analyzing trends and policies, it is useful to allocate emissions to the economic sector from which the emissions originate. These emissions are presented in Figure S-8 and Table S-3. In general, a comprehensive emission profile for a specific economic sector is developed by reallocating the relevant proportion of emissions from various Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) subcategories. This reallocation simply re-categorizes emissions under different headings and does not change the overall magnitude of Canadian emissions estimates.

 

Figure S-8: Canada’s Emissions Breakdown by Economic Sector (2012)

Figure S-8: Canada’s Emissions Breakdown by Economic Sector (2012)

Total: 699 Mt CO2 eq

Long Description for Figure S-8This pie chart presents the breakdown of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in megatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (Mt CO2 eq) and in percentages (%) by economic sector for 2012. Canada’s total GHG emissions in 2012 were estimated to be 699 Mt. The breakdown is based on the following seven economic sectors: the Oil and Gas Sector, which accounted for the largest contribution at 173 Mt or 25% of total emissions; Transportation (165 Mt or 24%); Electricity (86 Mt or 12%); Buildings (80 Mt or 11%); Emissions Intensive and Trade Exposed Industries (78 Mt or 11%); Agriculture (69 Mt or 10%); and Waste (47 Mt or 7%).

 

Table S-3: Canada's GHG Emissions by Economic Sector (1990-2012) in Mt CO2 equivalent
 19902000200520082009201020112012
Oil and Gas
101
151
159
162
161
163
164
173
Electricity
94
129
121
113
97
99
92
86
Transportation
128
155
168
166
163
167
166
165
Emissions Intensive & Trade Exposed IndustriesFootnote a
95
92
89
88
75
76
80
78
Buildings
70
82
84
84
82
79
85
80
Agriculture
54
66
68
71
66
68
67
69
Waste & OthersFootnote b
48
46
47
48
45
46
47
47
National GHG Total
591
721
736
731
689
699
701
699
Footnotes
Footnote n

Note: Totals may not add up due to rounding.
Estimates presented here are under continual improvement. Historical emissions may be changed in future publications as new data become available and methods and models are refined and improved. Recalculations resulting from methodological improvements are presented in Chapter 9, and recalculations resulting from changes to underlying activity data are presented in the chapter(s) associated with the sector where the changes occurred (Chapters 3-8).

Footnote a

The Emissions Intensive & Trade Exposed Industries represent emissions arising from non oil and gas mining activities, smelting and refining, and the production and processing of industrial goods such as paper or cement.

Return to footnote a referrer

Footnote b

"Others" includes Coal Production, Light Manufacturing, Construction & Forest Resources.

Return to footnote b referrer

 

Similar to the trends under IPCC sectors, the increase in GHG emissions between 1990 and 2012 was driven by growth in the oil and gas and transportation sectors. Increased production of crude oil as well as the expansion of the oil sands resulted in an increase in emissions of 72 megatonnes (Mt) in the oil and gas sector. In the transportation sector, changes in subsectors such as light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles caused an increase in emissions of 37 Mt when compared to 1990 levels. These increases were offset by decreases in emissions in the Electricity and Emissions Intensive and Trade Exposed Industries, where emissions fell 6 Mt and 17 Mt, respectively.

Further information on the IPCC and economic sector definitions and trends, as well as a detailed cross-walk between IPCC and economic sector categories, can be found in Chapter 2, Table 2-14.