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2015–2016 RPP Supplementary Tables

Horizontal Initiatives


The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) was approved in March 2005 (followed from the 2-year Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP)).

Name of lead department(s)

Environment Canada with support from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).

Federal partner organization(s)

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada Border Services Agency, Correctional Service Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, Industry Canada, Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated, Marine Atlantic Inc., National Capital Commission, National Defence, National Research Council of Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada Agency, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Transport Canada, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

The 2-year FCSAAP program, with $175 million in funding, commenced April 1, 2003. FCSAP was approved in 2005, with funding of $4.2 billion over 15 years.

End date of the horizontal initiative

FCSAP will continue to March 31, 2020; however, the current policy approval for the second phase of the Program ends on March 31, 2016.

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

$3.142 billion (excluding PWGSC accommodations charges) from April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2016

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The FCSAP provides a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites presenting the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2014, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $4.796 billion (Public Accounts of Canada 2014). Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall FCSAP program is administered by Environment Canada with support from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Shared outcome(s)

The primary objectives of FCSAP are to reduce environmental and human health risks from known federal contaminated sites and to reduce the associated federal financial liabilities in the Public Accounts of Canada, while giving priority to higher-risk sites.

Governance structures

The Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by the Director Generals Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

Planning highlights

FCSAP Phase II will focus remediation efforts on the highest-priority federal sites (including Giant and Faro Mines in the North). From April 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016 remediation activities will be conducted on an estimated 338 sites. Site assessments will occur on an estimated 190 sites. It is estimated that FCSAP remediation expenditures between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2016 (Phase II) will reduce liability for federal contaminated sites by up to $1.17 billion for all FCSAP-funded sites.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

FCSAP Secretariat
Compliance Promotion and Contaminated Sites Division
17th floor, Place Vincent Massey
351 St. Joseph Blvd
Gatineau, QC, K1A 0H3
FCSAP.PASCF@ec.gc.ca

Planning Information

Federal organizationsLink to departmental Program Alignment ArchitecturesContributing programs and activitiesTotal allocation (from start to end date)2015–16 Planned spendingTable note a2015–16 Expected results2015–16 Targets
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development CanadaResponsible Federal StewardshipContaminated Sites (On Reserve Program)205,034,0949,356,727See belowSee below
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development CanadaNorthern Land and Resources and Environmental ManagementContaminated Sites (Northern Program)1,346,053,323157,227,212See belowSee below
Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaInternal ServicesContaminated Sites7,862,647452,996See belowSee below
Canada Border Services AgencyCorporate Management and DirectionInfrastructure and Environment3,490,2120NASee below
Canadian Food Inspection AgencyNANA183,7830NASee below
Correctional Service CanadaInternal ServicesFacilities/Asset Management Services16,116,7701,117,240See belowSee below
Environment CanadaThreats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimizedAsset Remediation and Disposal (Internal Services Program)65,711,7455,155,459See belowSee below
Environment CanadaThreats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimizedContaminated Sites74,670,6585,212,670See belowSee below
Fisheries and Oceans CanadaInternal ServicesContaminated Sites – FCSAP Projects102,990,9304,783,170See belowSee below
Fisheries and Oceans CanadaFisheries ProtectionFisheries Protection Program - FCSAP Expert Support31,121,8611,705,992See belowSee below
Health CanadaFirst Nations and Inuit HealthFirst Nations and Inuit Health Protection7,445,1620NASee below
Health CanadaEnvironmental Risks to HealthContaminated Sites62,749,1203,242,682See belowSee below
Industry CanadaCommunications Research Centre CanadaContaminated Site Management Program162,0000NASee below
Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges IncorporatedManagement of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montréal areaNA27,033,6721,610,661See belowSee below
Marine Atlantic Inc.Corporate ManagementFCSAP (Projects)120,0000NASee below
National Capital CommissionReal Asset ManagementLand and real asset management34,518,0521,466,000See belowSee below
National Defence4.3.5Real Property Environment and Remediation692,424,22962,757,645See belowSee below
National Research Council of CanadaInternal ServicesEnvironmental Operations5,257,00018,000See belowSee below
Natural Resources CanadaInternal ServicesAsset Management Services - Real Property28,858,8070NASee below
Parks Canada AgencyConserve Heritage ResourcesActive Management and Restoration56,506,2373,666,318See belowSee below
Public Works and Government Services CanadaAccommodation and Real Property ServicesFCSAP (Projects)119,012,05928,268,573See belowSee below
Public Works and Government Services CanadaAccommodation and Real Property ServicesFCSAP (Expert Support)8,850,000650,000See belowSee below
Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceInternal ServicesFCSAP (Projects)25,605,2140NASee below
Transport CanadaSustainable Transportation Development and the EnvironmentEnvironmental Programs213,306,97122,959,906See belowSee below
Treasury Board of Canada SecretariatManagement Policies Development and Monitoring;
Government-Wide Programs Design and Delivery
Financial Management Policy;
Government-Wide Operations
5,385,582527,900See belowSee below
Total for all federal organizations  3,142,470,128310,179,151Not applicableNot applicable

*Excluding PWGSC accommodations charges.

Table notes

Table note a

Reprofile requests could be submitted to TBS later during the year and, pending TB approval of the reprofile requests, certain objectives as established in the RPP could be impacted.

Return to table note a referrer

Expected Results and Targets by program of federal partners:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

AANDC’s On Reserve Program plans to complete the remediation of 5 sites. An additional 15 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 40 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

AANDC’s Northern Program plans to complete the assessment of 2 sites and the remediation of 7 sites. An additional 44 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada plans to complete the assessment of 2 sites. An additional 2 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Correctional Service Canada will complete the assessment of 3 sites and the remediation of 1 site. An additional 5 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 2 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Environment Canada

Asset Remediation and Disposal (Internal Services Program) will complete the assessment of 1 site and remediation of 1 site. An additional 5 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 4 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Contaminated Sites Program (FCSAP Secretariat): In cooperation with the TBS, the FCSAP Secretariat supports the Director General and Assistant Deputy Minister steering committees and the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group; recommends program improvements, oversees the site approval and eligibility process; coordinates the site reporting process; manages program communications; and evaluates program performance.

In 2015–16, the FCSAP Secretariat will develop a funding proposal for renewed funding for FCSAP Phase III; review and update the program performance measurement framework, and provide guidance for custodians to improve program outcomes.

Through its role as an expert support department within FCSAP, Environment Canada will also conduct the following activities:

  • provide a central point of expert support services for custodial departments;
  • coordinate regional and headquarters activities of other expert support departments (including implementation of interdepartmental regional working groups, integrated work planning, etc.);  
  • coordinate and undertake the review of site classification scores with other expert support departments;
  • lead the resolution of technical issues related to site eligibility for funding;
  • ensure that information on program tools and guidance is disseminated, that lessons learned are shared and that custodians’ needs are addressed;
  • provide technical advice and expert information on ecological risks and environmental matters (e.g. compliance promotion with federal environmental statutes, National Classification System for Contaminated Sites and Aquatic Sites Classification System scoring, Canadian Council of Ministers for the Environment (CCME) approaches, waste management, sampling design, emerging chemicals, etc.) at the site level and at the program level via the development of science based tools, best practices, guidance documents, and environmental quality guidelines; and, 
  • provide training on the assessment and management of ecological risks at FCSAP sites as well as key training on other broader program-related aspects (ex. site prioritization, site closure tool).

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Contaminated Sites – FCSAP Projects Program will complete the assessment of 58 sites and the remediation of 11 sites. An additional 26 sites will have ongoing assessment activity and 55 sites will have ongoing remediation activity.

Fisheries Protection Program - FCSAP Expert Support will conduct the following activities:

  • provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments on the management of federal contaminated sites in relation to risks/impacts to fish and fish habitat;
  • promotion of regulatory compliance with relevant federal legislation, particularly the Fisheries Protection provisions of the Fisheries Act;
  • development of guidance material and provision of training to custodial organizations on the management of FCSAP sites (e.g., Aquatic Sites Classification System and Framework for Addressing and Managing Aquatic Contaminated Sites); and,
  • review of site classifications and technical documents to ensure that the potential impacts to fish and fish habitat have been appropriately considered.

Health Canada

Health Canada will conduct the following activities:

  • provision of guidance, training and advice on human health risk assessment and risk management;
  • review of eligibility scoring documents for terrestrial and aquatic sites under the National Classification System and review human health risk assessments and remediation plans for projects;
  • participation in interdepartmental national and regional working groups;
  • development of the human health component of CCME soil quality guidelines; and,
  • support Custodians in communicating risk to human health.

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated will have ongoing remediation activities on 2 sites.

National Capital Commission will complete the assessment of 40 sites. An additional 4 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

National Defence will complete the assessment of 3 sites and the remediation of 6 sites. An additional 4 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 78 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

National Research Council of Canada will report on 2014 –15 FCSAP assessment and remediation activities. 

Parks Canada Agency will complete the assessment of 8 sites and the remediation of 5 sites. An additional 17 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 25 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Public Works and Government Services Canada FCSAP Projects Program will complete the assessment of 1 site and the remediation of 2 sites. An additional 12 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

FCSAP Expert Support Program will conduct the following activities:

  • development of contaminated site management tools;
  • collection and sharing of innovative and sustainable/green approaches;
  • address procurement issues; and
  • inform the private sector of federal demand for services.

Transport Canada will complete the remediation of 6 sites. An additional 26 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat supports EC in the management of the FCSAP Program through the provision of strategic advice and policy guidance to ensure that ongoing implementation of FCSAP is undertaken in a manner that is consistent with Treasury Board policies on management of federal real property, including federal contaminated sites. In this role, TBS will advise EC on monitoring of government-wide progress, administer the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory, and coordinate planning for the biennial Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop to be held in 2016.

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Great Lakes Ecosystem Initiative

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

Great Lakes Ecosystem Initiative (GLEI)

Name of lead department

Environment Canada

Federal partner organizations

Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Infrastructure Canada, Transport Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

Non-federal and non-governmental partners

Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change

Ontario Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Rural Affairs

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2010 (Great Lake Action Plan V resources)

End date of the horizontal initiative

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

Great Lake Action Plan (GLAP): $8 million annually; continuing.

Action Plan for Clean Water (APCW) resources: $48.9 million over 14 years, from 2007 to 2021

Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative (GLNI) resources: $16 million over 4 years, from 2012 to 2016

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The GLEI is the name given to Environment Canada’s activities in support of the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes. These activities include negotiation and implementation of the Canada–United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and the Canada–Ontario Agreement (COA) on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health. Activities are supported by the implementation of the GLAP, the APCW sediment work, the GLNI and activities delivered through existing resources envelope (A-base resources).

The Government of Canada completed negotiations in 2012 with the Government of the United States (U.S.) to amend the GLWQA, which came into force on February 12, 2013. The GLWQA establishes long-term binational goals and objectives for the restoration and protection of Great Lakes water quality and aquatic ecosystem health. A new 2014–19 COA on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health, which will coordinate domestic actions to help deliver Canada’s obligations in the 2012 GLWQA entered into force on December 18, 2014. 

Great Lakes Action Plan

The GLAP was renewed in 2010 with a commitment to ongoing funding. An amount of $8 million per year is allocated to implement remedial actions to complete the clean-up and restoration in Areas of Concern (AOCs) with a focus on: fish and wildlife habitat rehabilitation and stewardship; contaminated sediment assessment and remediation; and innovative approaches to improve municipal stormwater and wastewater effluent quality.

Action Plan for Clean Water

Environment Canada’s APCW includes the Great Lakes sediment remediation initiative. Under this initiative, $48.9 million was allocated over 14 years through 2021 to undertake contaminated sediment management projects in AOCs. Work has been completed in four AOCs: Detroit River, Bay of Quinte, Niagara River, and Peninsula Harbour. The remaining funding has been allocated to work in the largest contaminated sediment site in Canada: Randle Reef, the Hamilton Harbour AOC. Funds are administered through the existing federal Great Lakes Sustainability Fund, with one third contributed by the Government of Canada, the Government of Ontario and local communities. Potential clean-up measures include the construction of containment structures around and over submerged contaminated sediments; the removal, treatment and disposal of sediment; and natural recovery with long-term monitoring. The remediation of contaminated sediment is an essential prerequisite to the longer-term objective of fully restoring environmental quality in certain Areas of Concern, a key commitment under the Canada–U.S. GLWQA.

Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative

In 2012, the Government of Canada committed $16 million over 4 years to the GLNI to address toxic and nuisance algae growth and nearshore water quality and aquatic ecosystem health in the Great Lakes.

The GLNI will address these issues by determining the current nutrient loadings from selected Canadian tributaries; supporting the negotiation of binational lake ecosystem objectives, phosphorus objectives and load reduction targets; developing policy options and strategies to meet those targets; and developing a nearshore assessment and management framework. The GLNI will also support Canada’s binational commitments under the GLWQA.

Shared outcome(s)

The GLWQA establishes broad, long term objectives for Canada and the U.S. in restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. The COA on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health provides a short-term (five year) plan for achieving Canada's GLWQA commitments. Through the COA, federal and provincial agencies are guided by a shared vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem for present and future generations. The COA also establishes a common purpose and shared goals, targeted results and commitments in fourteen Annexes.

Annex 1: Nutrients – To address the issue of excess nutrients and reduce harmful and nuisance algal blooms

Annex 2: Harmful Pollutants – To guide cooperative and coordinated actions to reduce or eliminate releases of harmful pollutants into the Great Lakes basin

Annex 3: Discharges from Vessels – To ensure that discharges from vessels do not adversely impact the Great Lakes

Annex 4 : Areas of Concern – To restore water quality and ecosystem health in Areas of Concern

Annex 5 : Lakewide Management – To advance restoration, protection and conservation of the Great Lakes through collaboration among jurisdictions domestically and binationally and with the Great Lakes community on a lake-by-lake basis

Annex 6: Aquatic Invasive Species – To ensure cooperative and coordinated efforts to reduce the threat of aquatic invasive species to Great Lakes water quality and ecosystem health

Annex 7: Habitat and Species – To continue efforts to restore, protect and conserve the resilience of Great Lakes native species and their habitats

Annex 8: Groundwater Quality – To gain a better understanding of how groundwater influences Great Lakes water quality and ecosystem health, and to identify priority areas for future action

Annex 9: Climate Change Impacts – To continue to build understanding of climate change impacts and advance the integration of this knowledge into Great Lakes adaptation strategies and management actions

Annex 10: Science – To enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of Great Lakes science activities through planning, cooperation, coordination and communication

Annex 11: Promoting Innovation – To create long-term, environmentally sustainable economic opportunities that improve water quality and ecological health and contribute to the well-being of the Great Lakes community

Annex 12: Engaging Communities – To provide opportunities for individuals and groups to enjoy and help take care of the Great Lakes

Annex 13: Engaging First Nations – To reflect the interests and important role of First Nations as participants in the restoration, protection and conservation of the Great Lakes

Annex 14: Engaging Métis – To reflect the interests and important role of Métis as participants in the restoration, protection and conservation of the Great Lakes

Governance structures

Federal signatories to the COA on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health include Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Infrastructure Canada, Transport Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The oversight of COA is entrusted to the COA Executive Committee. The Committee consists of Assistant Deputy Ministers, Regional Directors General or most senior regional representatives from all departments, ministries and agencies of the Parties who are responsible for leading or supporting one or more commitments. The Committee is co-chaired by Environment Canada and the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change.

Planning highlights

Please refer to the 2015–16 Expected Results and the 2015–16 Targetssections of this table for additional details.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

Jennifer McKay
Manager
Great Lakes Environment Office
Environment Canada
Tel.: 416-739-5712

Planning Information

Federal organizationsLink to departmental Program Alignment ArchitecturesContributing programs and activitiesTotal allocation (from start to end date)2015–16 Planned spending2015–16 Expected results2015–16 Targets
Environment CanadaSustainable EcosystemsCOA

$7.1 million/year – GLAP;

$48.9 million – APCW-Great Lakes Sediment;

$16 million – GLNI;

Existing departmental resources envelope
(A-Base)

$7.1 million – GLAP

$23.5 million – APCW

$2.3 million – GLNI

$2.7 million existing departmental resources envelope (A-Base)

See belowSee below
Fisheries and Oceans CanadaSustainable Aquatic Ecosystems

COA;

Fisheries Protection and Science;

Sea Lamprey Control Program

$0.9 million – GLAP;

$14.5 million – Existing departmental envelope (A-Base);

$40.1 million Existing departmental envelope (A-Base) – Sea Lamprey Control Program;

$6.1 million – Asian Carp Program

$0.9 million – GLAP

$3.0 million – Fisheries protection and science

$1.0 million – species at risk management and science

$8.1 million – Sea Lamprey Control Program

$3.2 million – Asian Carp Program

See belowSee below
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada1.2.3 Cost-shared Environmental Risk Assessment and ImplementationGrowing Forward$54.8 million – Environment and Climate Change Adaptation Designated Program for Ontario from April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018

$10.965 million

Figures for planned spending are taken from the Growing Forward 2 (GF2) bilateral agreement with Ontario for the designated Program 1.2, Environment and Climate Change Adaptation.

See belowSee below
Natural Resources Canada

Natural Resource Sectors

Consumers are Environmentally Responsible

Risks to natural resource sectors, infrastructure and human health are safely managed

Port Hope Long-term Low-level Radioactive Waste Management Project

Canadian Forest Service (CFS) – Forest harvesting in riparian zones

-Developing and validating indicators of sustainable riparian forest management based on emulation of natural disturbance

CFS – Understanding and mitigating risks to aquatic biodiversity

-Assessing impacts of forest harvesting and forest insect pests on aquatic ecosystems to develop mitigation strategies

Existing departmental resources envelope (A-Base and C-Base)

$65k in salary

$15k in Operations and Maintenance

  
Parks Canada

Heritage Places Establishment

Heritage Resources Conservation

COAExisting departmental resources envelope (A-Base)No COA allocation  
Transport Canada

Environmental Protection

Canadian Ballast Water Program

COA$82.0 thousand – existing departmental resources envelop (A-Base)$694 thousandSee belowSee below
Infrastructure CanadaInfrastructure funding program

Building Canada Plan (Building Canada Fund; Provincial – Territorial Base Fund; Gas Tax Fund)

Green Infrastructure Fund

Sunsetting programs (Infrastructure Stimulus Fund; Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund; Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund)

No COA allocation See belowSee below
Health CanadaEnvironmental Risks to HealthCOAExisting departmental resource envelope (A-Base)No COA allocationTable note aSee belowSee below
Total for all federal organizations  $193 million plus contributions from other departments (Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Infrastructure Canada, and Health Canada) through their existing resource envelopes.$40.2 plus existing departmental resource envelopes.Not applicableNot applicable

Table notes

Table note a

Specific resource figures are not available as this spending is not tracked separately in Health Canada's financial system.

Return to table note a referrer

2015–16 Expected Results:

Environment Canada

  • Address the issue of excess nutrients to reduce harmful and nuisance algal blooms (COA Annex 1, GLWQA Annex 4)
  • Guide cooperative and coordinated actions to reduce or eliminate releases of harmful pollutants into the Great Lakes basin (COA Annex 2, GLWQA Annex 3)
  • Restore water quality and ecosystem health in Areas of Concern (COA Annex 4), GLWQA Annex 1)
  • Advance restoration, protection and conservation of the Great Lakes through collaboration among jurisdictions domestically and binationally and with the Great Lakes community on a lake-by-lake basis (COA Annex 6, GLWQA Annex 2)
  • Continue efforts to restore, protect and conserve the resilience of Great Lakes native species and their habitats (COA Annex 7, GLWQA Annex 7)
  • Gain a better understanding of how groundwater influences Great Lakes water quality and ecosystem health, and to identify priority areas for future action (COA Annex 8, GLWQA Annex 8)
  • Continue to build understanding of climate change impacts and advance the integration of this knowledge into Great Lakes adaptation strategies and management actions (COA Annex 9, GLWQA Annex 9)
  • Enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of Great Lakes science activities through planning, cooperation, coordination and communication (COA Annex 10, GLWQA Annex 10)
  • Provide opportunities for individuals and groups to enjoy and help take care of the Great Lakes (COA Annex 12)
  • Reflect the interests and important role of First Nations as participants in the restoration, protection and conservation of the Great Lakes (COA Annex 13)
  • Reflect the interests and important role of Métis as participants in the restoration, protection and conservation of the Great Lakes (COA Annex 14)

Fisheries and Oceans

  • Overall Results: Work to protect commercial, recreational, and aboriginal fisheries by safegarding habitat that supports those fisheries, to conduct science to support fish habitat protection and species at risk, to control the established invasive sea lamprey to reduce their effects on fisheries and the ecosystem, to protect the Great Lakes from the invasion of Asian carps, and to prevent other new invading species. 
  • Provide monitoring and science to support delisting AoC including the Bay of Quinte, Toronto Harbour, Hamilton Harbour, Detroit River, St. Clair River, St. Marys River, and Niagara River.
  • Results include:
    • develop indices of Biotic Integrity and Habitat Productivity for nearshore fish populations;
    • develop fish habitat classification and supply models to measure the success of habitat restorations;
    • continue long-term assessment of lower-trophic levels and food web status; and
    • develop ecosystem models.
  • Deliver an integrated program of sea lamprey management in the Great Lakes in collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services, under the direction of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission.
    Results include:
    • successful lampricide treatments in tributaries and connection channels in Lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron, and Superior, to suppress invasive sea lampreys and to protect and restore native fishes;
    • Achieve suppression targets for abundances of adult sea lampreys in Lakes Ontario and Superior; and
    • Continue research and development of new alternative sea lamprey control methods including field trials of sea lamprey pheromones.  
  • Carry out risk assessments of potential aquatic invasive species, evaluated the impact of aquatic invasive species on Great Lakes ecosystems; and monitored ballast water management establishing their effectiveness in eliminating importation of new species through this vector.
  • Carry out a program in response to the threat of Asian Carps to the Great Lakes including monitoring for early detection, regulation at the border, assessment of risk of other species (Grass Carp and Black Carp), research into potential pathways and containment, and outreach.
  • Deliver a program of fisheries protection to regulate development to protect fish habitat supports commercial, recreational, and aboriginal fisheries. Provide science to support evaluation of fisheries protection measures and supported policy and protocols to apply best protection.
  • Carry out a species at risk program providing science and management to evaluate species status, develop species recovery potential assessments, recovery strategies, and regulate development to protect species at risk.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Increased adoption of cost-effective practices and technologies to improve nutrient use efficiency and reduce the risk of loss of excess nutrients from agricultural production.

Transport Canada

  • Ballast research and development
  • Update Ballast Water (BW) Database
  • Support BW Joint Enforcement
  • Protect Great Lakes from Vessel discharges

Health Canada

Health Canada (HC) supports work for the GLEI through the joint Environment Canada (EC)/HC Chemicals Management Plan (CMP). 

In 201516, HC and EC will continue to provide, through the CMP:

  • Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities.
  • Risk management measures under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, Pest Control Products Act, Hazardous Products Act, Canada Consumer Product Safety Act, and the Food and Drugs Act.
  • Drinking water quality guideline technical documents/guidance documents.
  • Science-based information on the risks posed by substances, in accordance with annual research plans.
  • Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food and consumer products.
  • Engagement, consultation and communication products to inform the public and stakeholders.
2015–16 Targets:

Environment Canada

  • Develop and undertake targeted stakeholder consultation on draft phosphorus targets for Lake Erie. In addition, the Department will develop draft lake ecosystem objectivesFootnote 1 for Lake Erie.
  • Complete an evaluation of the effectiveness of Canadian programs, policies and legislation related to the management of phosphorus, and develop policy options to strengthen identified weaknesses and address gaps.
  • Initiate construction of the Randle Reef Contaminated Sediment Remediation Project in the Hamilton Harbour AoC (with Public Works and Government Services Canada as the project manager).Footnote 2
  • Continue to implement priority protection, restoration and conservation actions under lakewide habitat and species protection, restoration and conservation strategies.
  • Identify priorities for science activities and actions for groundwater management, protection, and remediation.
  • Develop and release the annual Lakewide Action and Management Plan (LAMP) updates for each of the Canadian Great Lakes, and publish the 2015 Lake Superior LAMP under the GLWQA.
  • Draft a nearshore framework for public review--a commitment in the GLWQA. Work will include developing a binational (Canada and U.S.) process for assessing and managing nearshore waters. The final framework is to be developed by 2016 and, once implemented, the framework will allow the Parties to: determine the state of nearshore waters; identify areas of high stress and areas of high ecological value; and assess change over time.
  • Finalize draft indicators for use in assessing overall conditions of the Great Lakes ecosystem in 2016-17.
  • Encourage and support community projects and initiatives to help restore, protect and conserve the Great Lakes through the delivery of the EcoAction Community Fund, Great Lakes Sustainability Fund for Areas of Concern, and the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund.
  • Engage the Great Lakes community, including First Nations and Métis, in Great Lakes issues and priority setting.

Fisheries and Oceans

  • Beneficial Use Impairment evaluation assessments and supporting reports for fish communities, fish habitat, and lower trophic levels for Areas of Concern including the Bay of Quinte, Toronto Harbour, Hamilton Harbour, Detroit River,St. Clair River, St. Marys River, and Niagara River. 
  • Integrated program of sea lamprey management in the Great Lakes suppressing sea lampreys to target levels to support fish community objectives on Lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron, and Superior. Advance development and implementation of alternative techniques for sea lamprey control.  
  • Completed binational risk assessments for Grass Carp and Black Carps in the Great Lakes including evaluation of potential impacts. Science evaluation and advice on the status of current ballast water management efforts in the Great Lakes. Science advice about new control technologies and approaches to implementation of the International Marine Organization ballast water convention. 
  • Complete early detection of target areas for monitoring for Asian carps, response to any detection coordinated with Ontario and with U.S. partner agencies. Provide science and science advice about containment technologies. Outreach to inform Canadians about the risks and prevention approaches for Asian carps.  
  • Development of priority regulation to protect fish habitat supporting commercial, recreational, and Aboriginal fisheries. Science advice provided to support evaluation of fisheries protection measures and supported policy and protocols to apply best protection.
  • Development of regulation to protect species at risk. Provision of species status reports, recovery potential analyses, and species recovery strategies.  

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

  • No specific targets are identified in Growing Forward 2 bilateral.
  • Great Lakes specific activities are not separated, but are assumed to include the entire province.

Transport Canada

  • Continue 100% enforcement of Balast Water in Seaway
  • Oil Spill/Sewage Inspections

Health Canada

HC, in conjunction with EC, will support continued work under the CMP to reduce the release of harmful substances to the Great Lakes.

In 201516, HC and EC will continue assessment and management of the potential health and ecological risks associated with approximately 1,500 substances. Draft Screening Assessment Reports covering approximately 150 substances are planned to be published in 201516, as well as 17 living organisms on the Domestic Substances List (DSL). Final Assessment Reports covering approximately 1,350 substances are also planned to be published in 201516.

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The Group on Earth Observations

General Information

Name of horizontal initiative

The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is a key international engagement of the Government of Canada that is coordinated through the Federal Committee on Geomatics and Earth Observations (FCGEO).

Name of lead department(s)

Environment Canada is the lead department in International GEO by virtue of the identification of the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) of the Meteorological Service of Canada as the GEO Principal.

Federal partner organization(s)

Domestically, contributing departments and agencies are Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), and Environment Canada (EC).

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)

Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative

July 2003

End date of the horizontal initiative

In January 2014, Ministers approved an extension of GEO mandate until 2025

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date)

Funding is provided through the existing resources envelope (A-Base) and in-kind contributions from federal departments. A contribution agreement was signed in 2013 between EC and GEO for a 5-year period, committing Canada to a contribution of $100,000 per year through 2018.

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The GEO seeks to implement the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to allow free and open access to Earth observations for decision- and policy-makers in all countries. In doing so, users such as EC and NRCan will be able to better predict the future state of Planet Earth and better warn citizens of the onset of hazardous conditions. See the GEO website for more details.

Shared outcome(s)

  • Enhancing access to Global Earth Observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international
  • Improving evidence-based decision making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations

Governance structures

Coordination is achieved through the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)-level FCGEO, the Director General-level Shadow Committee and other ad hoc committees.

Planning highlights

The interdepartmental ADM-level FCGEO steering committee is co-chaired by AAFC and NRCan. This committee will remain active in ensuring national coordination of Earth Observation issues, providing direction to make linkages with geomatics initiatives and explore the larger issue of data standard and sharing policies and principles.

In the coming years, Canada’s active participation in international GEO will contribute to global efforts in the area of forest carbon tracking, the Global Forest Observation Initiative and the fire danger rating system (Canadian Forest Service and the CSA). DFO will contribute to the GEO Blue Planet efforts to coordinate the collection and dissemination (with a goal in real-time) of marine observations. Canada (through EC) will also contribute to conserving global biodiversity, through a new leadership role as Vice Chair of the GEO Biodiversity Observation Network Steering Committee.

Canada will continue in a leadership and coordination role for the development and implementation of the Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM), including hosting the global secretariat and JECAM coordination website (AAFC) and through contributions of RADARSAT-2 data to research sites (CSA). Canada actively supports G20 GEOGLAM (the GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative), as a member of the core implementation team and co-lead of the Research for Monitoring Enhancements component, through AAFC, which will continue to lead Canada’s engagement.

In fiscal year 2015–16, NRCan’s Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation (CCMEO) will continue to support access by the Government of Canada to key new international Earth Observation satellite missions through its revitalized satellite infrastructure. The Government of Canada is preparing to add Sentinel 1 to the suite of satellites received. DFO scientists are involved in the scientific development of the Sentinel-3 and Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) missions.

Canada, through the CSA, is contributing significant resources to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), a key Participating Organization in GEO. CEOS Member and Associate Agencies coordinate their assets and provide invaluable resources in support of GEO-related initiatives. Canada makes available sought-after expertise and supports two key leadership positions in CEOS, the incoming Executive Officer and the Vice-Chair of the Working Group on Disasters. In-kind resources will also be dedicated to other initiatives such as the response to the GEO Water Strategy Report and Earth Observation data quality assurance.

Canada also provides unique datasets from its earth observation satellites to support GEO flagships in agriculture, forest and also disaster risk management, and polar-related initiatives.

Canada will also play a key role in promoting good governance and accountability of GEO, with EC participating in the team conducting the fifth evaluation of GEOSS implementation. Canada is also engaged in the development of the next 10-year GEOSS Implementation Plan (GEO Strategic Plan 2015-2025: Implementing GEOSS) which will lay out the detailed work plan to achieve GEO’s vision and strategic objectives in the post-2015 era. This will be presented to Ministers for endorsement in November 2015.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

Danielle Lacasse
Director General
Policy, Planning and Partnership Directorate
Meteorological Service of Canada
Environment Canada
819-934-4571
danielle.lacasse@ec.gc.ca

Planning Information

Federal organizationsLink to departmental Program Alignment ArchitecturesContributing programs and activitiesTotal allocation (from start to end date)2015–16 Planned spending2015–16 Expected results2015–16 Targets
Environment CanadaWeather and Environmental Services for CanadiansMeteorological Service of CanadaNot applicable

In-kind contributions of $75,000 salary and $50,000 operation and maintenance from the existing resources envelope (A‑Base);

new contribution of $100,000

Please refer to the section belowPlease refer to the section below
Natural Resources Canada

Responsible Natural Resource Management

Protections for Canadians and Natural Resources

a. Canadian Forest Service In kind: $34,000Please refer to the section belowPlease refer to the section below
Natural Resources Canada

Responsible Natural Resource Management

Protections for Canadians and Natural Resources

b. Earth Sciences Sector/CCMEO In kind: from existing resource envelopePlease refer to the section belowPlease refer to the section below
Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaEnvironmental Knowledge, Technology, Information and Measurement. a. Science and Technology In kind: 0.5 FTE ($60,000 salary) and $50,000 O&M from existing resource envelopePlease refer to the section belowPlease refer to the section below
Canadian Space AgencySpace Data, Information and Servicesa. Earth Observations 

2 FTEs ($200 000 salaries)

$15,000 O&M (travel)

$287,000 for RADARSAT-1 and RADARSAT-2 imagery processing in support of GEO-led initiatives

Please refer to the section belowPlease refer to the section below
Fisheries and Oceans CanadaScience for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture to National /
International Missions
and
Ocean Forecasting
a. Ecosystems and Oceans Science Sector 2.0 FTEs (combined) and approx. $10,000 O&M (travel)Please refer to the section belowPlease refer to the section below
Total for all federal organizations  Not applicable$100,000
(contribution from Environment Canada)
Not applicableNot applicable

Expected Results and Targets by program of federal partners:

Participation in GEO by Canadian departments is expected to have benefits in GEO’s nine areas: ecosystems, biodiversity, agriculture/forestry, energy production, human health, weather forecasting, climate forecasting, disaster risk reduction, and water management. GEO’s coordination of open and full access to all available space-based and in-situ Earth observations is consistent with the Government of Canada’s Open Government Strategy, which commits to open data in order to increase the amount and improve the quality of information available to decision- and policy-makers at all levels of government and in industry, resulting in better predictions, identification of issues and adaptation and mitigation strategies and overall better management of these areas.

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Footnotes

Footnote 1

The objectives are desirable ecological conditions that will be used as benchmarks against which to measure status and trends, as called for in the GLWQA.

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Footnote 2

To be completed in 2022, the project involves the construction of an engineered containment facility in the harbour, dredging contaminated sediment, and installing an impermeable cap. The facility will then be operated as a port facility by the Hamilton Port Authority.

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