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2014–2015 Report on Plans and Priorities

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcomes


Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

Performance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Percentage of terrestrial area protectedFootnote 1 as a measure of conservation effort17%December 2020

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Program 1.1: Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Program Description

This program aims to prevent biodiversity loss while still enabling sustainable use by conserving and managing migratory birds; protecting and recovering species at risk; and monitoring, conserving, restoring and rehabilitating significant habitats. The program works toward these goals by establishing and maintaining a network of protected areas and stewardship programs. It also aims to ensure coordinated and coherent national assessment, planning and action to protect biodiversity, including viable populations of species, healthy and diverse ecosystems, and genetic resources. The program forms strategic partnerships for integrated management of Canada's natural capital, including stewardship and the sustainable management of landscapes. This program has responsibilities under the Species at Risk Act; the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994; the Canada Wildlife Act; and the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act. International responsibilities include the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (1992), the Migratory Birds Convention, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna Working Group of the Arctic Council, and the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, especially as Waterfowl Habitat (known as the Ramsar Convention). Contributions in support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat are used as a component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
91,592,39491,592,39477,524,13077,247,467

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
548497488

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Program 1.1: Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Populations of wildlife, in particular migratory birds and federally-listed species at risk, are maintained or restoredProportion of assessed migratory bird species in General Status Reports whose status is considered to be secure81%2015 General Status Report

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat Program, the Department will:

  • In support of commitments under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), continue to deliver scientific assessments and recovery planning documents for species at risk and implement recovery actions through the Habitat Stewardship Program and other programs that foster action to protect and recover species at risk and that ensure species and their critical habitats are protected. The number of overdue recovery documents will be reduced.
  • Support the development of a National Conservation Plan that provides a vision for conservation in Canada, that aligns and bolsters conservation efforts in terrestrial, freshwater, marine and urban areas across Canada, and that builds on successes to date.
  • Collaborate with partners in support of species at risk at home and internationally, including with landowners and decision-makers to support conservation of biodiversity (particularly for species at risk and migratory birds), as well as through implementation of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) in Canada.
  • Develop tools – including integrated data and maps on species at risk and migratory bird populations, protected and sensitive areas – to support local planning to help ensure that wildlife species, migratory birds and their habitats are more readily and fully considered in decision making, including the posting of Bird Conservation Regions Strategies.
  • Continue to monitor the status of migratory birds and their habitats, and collaborate with decision-makers and other partners to manage key threats to migratory birds, provide habitat for priority species, and work to modernize the Migratory Birds Regulations.
  • Maintain Environment Canada’s network of National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries, work toward the designation of new National Wildlife Areas, and manage habitat stewardship programs.
  • Participate in and lead Canadian delegations to international meetings in support of biodiversity, including meetings of the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna Working Group (of the Arctic Council) which the Department chairs. Environment Canada will continue to lead and coordinate priorities under the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy.

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Sub-Program 1.1.1: Biodiversity Policy and Priorities

Sub-program Description

This program enables Environment Canada to play a national leading role in engaging stakeholders, provincial and territorial governments, and other federal government departments in Canada’s implementation of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. The program provides scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision-makers, and develops and applies models for social, cultural and economic valuation of ecosystem services to support sustainable development decision-making. This work enables information about the ecosystem and the environmental effects of development proposals to be factored into decisions across different levels of government, environmental and non-governmental organizations, the industrial sector, research community and the general public. Strategies used in Canada include the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy, Biodiversity Outcomes Framework, and Access and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources. Canada also participates internationally in the Convention on Biological Diversity; the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources; the Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on Liability and Redress under the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety; and Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna under the Arctic Council. The program also serves as the Canadian lead and national focal point for the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Program funding includes Canada’s annual contribution to the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity and support for international working groups.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2,454,4002,443,3422,443,342
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
141313

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Biodiversity Policy and Priorities
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Biodiversity goals and targets are integrated into federal, provincial and territorial strategies and plans that have an impact on biodiversityPercentage of federal departments with natural resource or environmental mandates, provinces and territories that have identified and are implementing measures to enhance biodiversity100%September 2014

Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Biodiversity Policy and Priorities Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Prepare and coordinate Canada’s participation in international meetings related to the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefits Sharing of Genetic Resources, and the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) Working Group of the Arctic Council. In addition, Environment Canada will host two meetings to advance implementation of the CAFFworkplan.   
  • Provide ongoing leadership and coordination to complete current priorities under the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy – including the national Biodiversity Goals and Targets, the Value of Nature to Canadians Study and the Canadian Nature Survey.
  • In collaboration with federal, provincial and territorial partners, continue to develop and apply models for valuation of ecosystem services to support sustainable development decisions, and identify future priorities under the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy.

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Sub-Program 1.1.2: Species at Risk

Sub-program Description

The purpose of this program is to ensure implementation of the Species at Risk Act (SARA). SARA is a key federal government commitment to prevent wildlife species from becoming extinct and to secure the necessary actions for their recovery. It provides for publication of recovery documents, legal protection of wildlife species, and reporting on progress. This is achieved in part through funding programs such as the Habitat Stewardship Program, Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk and Interdepartmental Recovery Fund. The program relies on partnerships with provincial, territorial and other governments, as well as Aboriginal peoples and other organizations (e.g., environmental organizations, industry associations, etc.). A number of advisory bodies and committees have been established to enable key partners to engage in this program. Authority for the program is based on SARA and Canada’s obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, and the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
45,681,50134,081,17334,081,173

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
220178176

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Species at Risk
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Critical habitat is protected

Percentage of Threatened and Endangered species at risk for which Environment Canada is responsible:

  1. whose critical habitat occurs wholly or in part within federal protected areas with that critical habitat described in the Canada Gazette;
  2. whose critical habitat occurs wholly or in part on other federal lands with that habitat legally protected;
  3. whose critical habitat occurs wholly or in part on non-federal lands with an assessment that the habitat is protected
Targets will be set once baseline values for the percentage of critical habitat that is currently protected are knownTo be determined
Status of listed species shows improvement upon reassessmentProportion of federally listed species at risk for which recovery is feasible that exhibit, at the time of reassessment by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), population and distribution trends consistent with achieving the objectives of recovery strategies or management plansPerformance Measurement Framework target to be determinedTo be determined
Icon for Theme III (n)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to comeProportion of federally listed species at risk for which recovery is feasible that exhibit, at the time of reassessment by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), population and distribution trends consistent with achieving the objectives of recovery strategies or management plansFSDS Target 4.1: Species at Risk – By 2020, populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans.2020
Icon for Theme III (n)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to comeFSDS indicator: Total land area and shoreline that has been improved or restored to benefit wildlife under the Habitat Stewardship ProgramFSDS Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat Stewardship – Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.2020

Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Species at Risk Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to deliver on the scientific assessments of species at risk:
    • Deliver programs for the General Status of Species in Canada, including a required five-year report under Species at Risk Act (SARA) and fulfill key commitments under the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk.
    • Act as a scientific authority on the Committee of the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). Environment Canada will also maintain support to the COSEWIC– including for its April 2014 wildlife assessment meeting – to ensure delivery of species status assessments as the important first step in the Species at Risk cycle.
    • Guide the listing process of species at risk under SARA, ensuring listings are based on the best available information. The Department will also improve tools for maintaining and tracking progress of the 407 listed terrestrial species at risk to support the Department in meeting its obligations under SARA.
    • Apply a nationally consistent and transparent scientific review of permit applications related to activities that can have impacts on species at risk listed under SARA through the development and implementation of a risk assessment framework for permitting under SARA for terrestrial species.
  • Accelerate the posting of recovery documents for listed species.
  • Continue to implement recovery activities for terrestrial species (e.g., Piping Plover) and continue to work collaboratively with others to address recovery of other species (e.g., Woodland Caribou, Polar Bear and Sage Grouse).
  • Make progress on completing assessments of the protection of species at risk and their identified critical habitat, as required under SARA.
  • Collaborate with other federal departments and provincial and territorial partners to ensure implementation of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) in Canada.

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Sub-Program 1.1.3: Migratory Birds

Sub-program Description

This program protects and conserves populations of migratory bird species. It is responsible for implementing the Migratory Birds Convention signed with the United States in 1916, via the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. Activities include conserving populations, individual birds, and their nests and habitats through continued conservation actions, stewardship, policy development, and enforcement of the Act and its regulations. It also protects important bird habitats, minimizes other stressors that affect population status, and manages emergencies regarding health and safety issues associated with migratory birds. The program implements recommendations of the review of migratory bird monitoring programs. It is responsible, as a signatory to the North American Bird Conservation Initiative, for ensuring that all conservation plans for North America’s 12 Bird Conservation Regions, and similarly the 25 Bird Conservation Region Strategies are publicly available, in addition to carrying out actions for priority migratory bird species as indicated by the Bird Conservation Regions plans. The Migratory Birds program is delivered in partnership with other governments and inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations. Client groups include the Canadian public, game bird hunters, Aboriginal peoples (subsistence harvesting), natural resource economic sectors and natural resource users, and other governments (provincial/territorial and foreign).

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
22,338,40920,760,83820,449,709
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
189182178

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Migratory Birds
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Migratory bird populations maintained at population goalsProportion of migratory bird species for which data is available meeting population goalsPerformance Measurement Framework target to be determined once population goals are agreed uponTo be determined
Icon for Theme III (n)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to comeProportion of migratory bird species for which data is available meeting population goalsFSDS Target 4.2: Migratory Birds – Improve the proportion of migratory bird species that meet their population goals.To be determined

Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Migratory Birds Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to monitor the status of migratory birds, taking action as required to protect and conserve their populations, nests and habitats. Using population goals set through the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and the national suite of Bird Conservation Regions (BCR) Strategies (for all species), the Department will address both declining and over-abundant species:
    • For species in decline, Environment Canada will continue to prioritize monitoring activities to better understand these trends and the reasons for them, and to inform activities needed to reverse them.
    • For over-abundant species, efforts will focus on reducing these populations and keeping their populations in a desirable range through landscape and/or habitat modification and increasing mortality risk.
  • Implement BCRStrategies, with emphasis on compliance promotion, stakeholder engagement, and sector education.
  • Address conservation concerns indicated in BCR Strategies, Recovery Strategies and Departmental research on human-induced mortality to birds through actions to mitigate threats and provide needed habitats. This will be carried out through partnerships with other levels of government, non-governmental organizations, industry and other partners.
  • Provide advice on the requirements for the protection and conservation of migratory birds during environmental assessment processes – notably those referenced in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 – through web publishing, targeted correspondence and provision of expert testimony in review panels.
  • Promote compliance with the Migratory Birds Regulations and the Migratory Bird Sanctuary Regulations through web publishing and targeted communications and correspondence. 

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Sub-Program 1.1.4: Wildlife Habitat Conservation

Sub-program Description

The program provides for the protection of priority, unique and rare habitats required for the conservation of migratory birds and species at risk. It provides mechanisms to enter into partnership arrangements with a wide variety of stakeholders and through initiatives to encourage actions by non-governmental organizations and Canadians that conserve and protect wildlife habitat and habitat for species at risk. The program also coordinates the federal government’s response to the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada. Enabling acts include the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994; the Canada Wildlife Act; the Species at Risk Act; and the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (known as the Ramsar Convention). Program delivery includes the assessed contribution to the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention).

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
21,118,08420,238,77720,273,243
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
126123122

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Wildlife Habitat Conservation
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Habitats that are needed to achieve waterfowl population goals are securedLand secured by Environment Canada, provinces and territories, and land conservation non-governmental organizations under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan to achieve population goals for all priority waterfowl9.99 million hectaresDecember 2017
Icon for Theme III (n)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come

FSDSindicators:

Land secured by Environment Canada and partners as a percentage of the total amount needed to achieve waterfowl population goals

Total land area identified that is key to the conservation of migratory birds and species at risk

Percentage of total terrestrial territory (including inland water) conserved in protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures

FSDS Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat Stewardship – Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.2020
Icon for Theme III (n)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come

FSDSindicators:

Number of known new invasive alien species in Canada, by federal regulatory status

Percent of federally regulated foreign invasive alien species not established in Canada

FSDS Target 4.6:  Invasive Alien Species – By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.2020

Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Wildlife Habitat Conservation Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to address findings of the Department’s Protected Area Operational ReviewFootnote 2, including completing, and making publicly available, management plans for the Department’s National Wildlife Areas, as well as investing in critical facilities and equipment.
  • Continue to develop and advance new protected areas initiatives–including consultation and negotiation with the various stakeholders in each protected area to consider and address local needs.
  • Collaborate with international, federal, provincial, Aboriginal and non-governmental organizations and individuals to protect, improve and/or restore habitat to enhance the survival of migratory birds and species at risk.
  • Implement various habitat stewardship programs, including the Ecological Gift Program.

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Program 1.2: Water Resources

Program Description

This program addresses the risks to and impacts on water resources from industrial activities, agriculture, climate change and other factors. Its goal is to ensure threats to Canada’s water resources and aquatic ecosystems are minimized, and the sustainability of the resource is maintained. The program is delivered in collaboration with partners that include other federal departments, provinces and territories, and a range of non-governmental organizations. The program focuses on Environment Canada’s contribution to monitoring water quality and conducting water-related research and analysis, and its role in collaborating with other departments to determine priorities for water quality, quantity, and aquatic ecosystem monitoring and research. It provides scientific information and advice to decision-makers. The program supports the implementation of the Canada Water Act, the Action Plan for Clean Water, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Fisheries Act, the International Boundary Waters Treaty Act, and the International River Improvements Act. Contributions in support of Water Resources are used as a component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
91,196,85791,196,85788,228,01388,013,012
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
743732723

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Program 1.2: Water Resources
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Threats to Canada's water resources and aquatic ecosystems are minimized and the sustainability of the resource is maintainedPercentage of core national monitoring sites whose water quality is rated as good or excellent50% of core national monitoring sites rated as good or excellent2010–12 data set

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Water Resources Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to monitor water quality and quantity, including through the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring, develop a risk-based approach and tools for more robust water quality monitoring and identify impacts of climate change.
  • Contribute to inter-jurisdictional water management through targeted studies aimed at improving flood forecasting and water management, and provide expertise in support of flood prediction and emergency response decisions across Canada.
  • Improve data accessibility through development of a Water Survey of Canada Datamart.
  • Participate in a number of international water management initiatives, including the World Meteorological Organization to support monitoring in the Arctic Drainage Basin.

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Sub-Program 1.2.1: Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health

Sub-program Description

The program supports the water quality-related obligations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Canada Water Act, the Fisheries Act, the International Boundary Waters Treaty Act, and federal/provincial/territorial and Canada–United States water quality agreements. The program provides water quality monitoring and reporting, including through annual reports on the Freshwater Quality Index. The program delivers Environment Canada’s responsibilities under the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative, such as scientific monitoring activities and support for initiatives to increase information-sharing and analysis among partners and networks. This program also coordinates with the United States several research and monitoring activities in the Great Lakes under the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The program collaborates with the Government of Alberta and stakeholders to implement the three-year Joint Canada–Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring. The plan is an integrated approach to monitoring, evaluation, and reporting on the significance of environmental contaminant pathways in air and water, biological effects, and impacts of habitat disturbance from the oil sands. The program also monitors water quality in Canadian shellfish growing areas for the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program, which is administered jointly by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Environment Canada, and Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
68,355,62566,567,19566,352,195
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
506498492

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Canada's water resource policies and programs are informed by water quality and aquatic ecosystem health data and information from ongoing monitoring of waters under federal jurisdiction or responsibilityPercentage of sites within Environment Canada's national core water quality monitoring network at which water quality monitoring was performed100% of sites monitored annuallyMarch 2015

Icon for Theme II (w)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15 through the Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to monitor levels of bacterial contamination of marine waters in shellfish regions through the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program to promote food safety for Canadians as well as Canada’s access to import/export markets.
  • Strengthen Environment Canada’s risk-based approach to fresh water quality monitoring using a risk-based basin analysis tool. This science-based tool will help the Department’s water quality experts focus monitoring activities and resources on the most vulnerable areas, and identify new and emerging threats in the future.
  • Continue to implement the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring, including by conducting monitoring, research and analysis of water resources in the Lower Athabasca region. By the time the Plan is fully implemented in 2015, the number of sampling sites will have increased from 21 to 40, over a larger area; there will also be increases in the number of types of water quality parameters being sampled, and in the frequency of sampling.
  • Implement a National Laboratory Information Management System that integrates and harmonizes the workflows across Science and Technology Laboratories to better support the analytical needs of monitoring, research, enforcement and emergencies.
  • Identify (through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative) sources and impacts of nutrient loadings to Lake Winnipeg to advance the remediation of water quality.
  • Determine the hydrologic and aquatic ecosystem impacts of climate change and variability to inform adaptation planning and mitigation actions and support domestic and international climate and water policy development and decision-making.

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Sub-Program 1.2.2: Water Resources Management and Use

Sub-program Description

This program conducts research and monitoring, and advances knowledge on the state of watersheds through the Canadian Council of Ministers on the Environment, in order to support integrated water management decisions at the federal/provincial/territorial levels. It promotes and enables the application of science-based information to inform decision-making in an integrated and coherent manner consistent with the Canada Water Act. The program coordinates water quality and water quantity science and monitoring to inform decisions, policy development and management approaches. The program coordinates with Canadian and U.S. government agencies (e.g., International Joint Commission), and lends expertise to domestic and international water boards on domestic and transboundary issues such as protecting ecosystems, avoiding flooding and providing sufficient flow of water to support economic activities in waterways from Lake Ontario to the St. Lawrence River, Lake Superior to Lake Huron, and in other transboundary rivers.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2,555,6212,551,8832,551,882
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
292928

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Water Resources Management and Use
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Water resource decision-makers have the necessary information and stakeholder perspectives to make responsible and appropriate shared-resource decisionsClient satisfaction index, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent)Target will be set once a baseline value is measured (in 2014)To be determined

Icon for Theme II (w)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Water Resources Management and Use Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to meet its domestic, international and legislative obligations through participation on inter-jurisdictional boards and studies. Hydrometric data will continue to be provided by the Water Survey of Canada and will be used to provide information on natural water flows, apportionment and other calculations to help water resource decision-makers meet their obligations.
  • Work with the International Joint Commission to finalize recommendations on updated water regulation plans for Lake Ontario and Lake Superior, and to identify and develop initial areas of work for adaptive response measures to address extremes of water levels in the Great Lakes.

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Sub-Program 1.2.3: Hydrological Service and Water Survey

Sub-program Description

Information on the water cycle is critical to Canada’s health and safety (e.g., flood forecasting and prevention) and to economic efficiency (e.g., agriculture, hydroelectricity and international shipping), by collecting and disseminating hydrological data and information to support water management decisions. The hydrological data, meteorological and ancillary information provided through program are used by international, federal, provincial, territorial and municipal agencies to regulate and respond to changing water levels and flows within Canada, and in bodies of water that cross international boundaries. Under the Canada Water Act, monitoring activities of this program are carried out through cost-shared bilateral agreements between Environment Canada and each of the provinces and territories (Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada represents Nunavut and the Northwest Territories). These agreements create the national framework within which Environment Canada collects, interprets and provides level and flow information, and supports scientific investigations. Delivery of the program involves staff in Environment Canada headquarters and each region. Program delivery may include contributions in support of Water Resources.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
20,285,61119,108,93519,108,935
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
208206203

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Hydrological Service and Water Survey
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTargetsDate to be achieved
Canadians and their institutions have the hydrological data, information and knowledge they need to make water management decisionsClient satisfaction index, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent)Performance Measurement Framework target will be set once a baseline value is measured (in 2015)To be determined
Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3:  Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystemsClient satisfaction index, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent)FSDS Target 3.12: Water Resource Management – Facilitate sustainable water resource management through the collection of data and the development and dissemination of knowledge from 2013-16.2016

Icon for Theme II (w)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through its Hydrological Service and Water Survey Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Increase, in real time, data product availability and accessibility through the development of a Water Survey of Canada Datamart. Currently, both real-time data and historical data are available through the Department’s Water Office website.
  • Develop risk-based tools to optimize network planning and design activities which could lead to identifying new station locations and priorities for resource allocations. These tools will be developed though a three-year Natural Science and Engineering Research Council research project (2012–15) led by McMaster University and private sector consulting services.
  • Provide expertise to provincial and territorial partners, including Emergency Management Organizations, in support of their flood prediction and emergency response programs.
  • Work bilaterally with the United States (U.S. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) on hydrometric training and technology developments, such as hydro acoustics and ancillary tools.
  • Examine new approaches for water management using remotely-sensed data through the Water From Space initiative
  • Work through the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Hydrology on basic systems in hydrology, flood frequency analysis and capacity building.
  • Work through the WMO Arctic-HYCOS (Hydrological Cycle Observing System) program to improve hydrometric monitoring, accuracy and data availability in the Arctic Drainage Basin.

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Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Program Description

This program aims to sustain Canada’s ecosystems over the long term by providing Canadians, their governments and the private sector with the environmental information and tools required to incorporate social, economic and environmental considerations into decision-making and action. Environmental assessments are a large part of this program. The ecosystem approach to environmental management focuses on maintaining the capacity of a whole system to produce ecological goods and services, such as water resources, air and water quality, and genetic resources to support our economy, security, health and well-being. This program focuses on the development and implementation of Environment Canada’s sustainability policies and strategies, information to support integrated, ecosystem-scale planning, community engagement in remediation of sites, youth engagement, and research and reporting on environmental status and trends. The program facilitates inter-disciplinary and cross-sectoral planning, and information sharing among partners. Contributions in support of Sustainable Ecosystems are used as a component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
92,013,64292,013,64282,871,75562,603,076
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
350335307

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Canadians manage ecosystem resources in a manner consistent with ecosystem sustainabilityAggregated score of selected ecosystem indicators across ecosystem initiativesTarget to be determinedTo be determined

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Sustainable Ecosystems Program, the Department will:

  • Implement the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), including actions to maximize its potential as an information tool and to improve its efficiency.
  • Update and expand the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) to broaden coverage of environmental issues.
  • Participate in federal environmental assessments as a federal authority, providing specialist or expert information or knowledge to responsible authorities and panels on environmental matters.
  • Continue to participate in the federal government’s Major Projects Management Office coordinating committee to enable the Department to influence the sustainability of resource development projects most critical to Canada’s economy.
  • Continue to provide coordinated activities within priority ecosystems, working within an established framework and with partners across Canada.

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Sub-Program 1.3.1: Sustainability Reporting and Indicators

Sub-program Description

The program works with other government departments, through the Sustainable Development Office to implement the Federal Sustainable Development Act, which mandates Environment Canada to lead the implementation, tracking and reporting of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS). The Act requires the Minister of the Environment to develop and implement a federal sustainable development strategy that will make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament. In accordance with the Act, every three years the strategy is tabled in Parliament setting out the federal sustainable development goals, targets and implementation strategies. In addition, the Sustainable Development Office provides, at least once every three years, a report on the federal government’s progress in implementing the FSDS. Finally, this program supports the responsible federal departments and agencies in developing and tabling their individual strategies to reflect how their program activities will support the FSDS within one year of the tabling of the FSDS in the House of Commons. These strategies support and foster greater transparency and accountability both to the public and Parliament. This program also works with other government departments, through the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators initiative, to report on environmental indicators that track the progress of the FSDSand issues of concern to Canadians including air quality and climate, water quality and availability, and protecting nature.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
7,844,1857,827,6687,827,668
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
585857

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Sustainability Reporting and Indicators
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Increased use of Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators in sustainable development policy and reportingAnnual number of external research, policy or media-related publications that adopt as measures or analyses the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators70 publicationsDecember 2014
Policies and plans of federal government departments reflect the goals and targets in the Federal Sustainable Development StrategyPercentage of goals, targets and implementation strategies from the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy integrated into annual departmental reporting (e.g., Reports on Plans and Priorities, Departmental Performance Reports)100%March 2015

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Sustainability Reporting and Indicators Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Maximize the utility of the FSDS by enhancing both how information is presented and accessed by users and the linkages between the FSDS and the core federal planning and reporting, as well as exploring timely updates to sustainability indicators.
  • Begin the process of preparing the next FSDS (2016–19) to reflect stakeholder feedback, such as by including participation of more departments not subject to the Federal Sustainable Development Act.
  • Develop opportunities for FSDS departments and agencies to streamline and increase the effectiveness of their progress reporting, in preparation for a whole-of-government progress report in 2015–16.
  • Continue to develop, update and expand the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI), working toward full indicator coverage of the FSDS. The Department will also explore the development of additional information products to expand the type and nature of environmental indicators available to Canadians.

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Sub-Program 1.3.2: Ecosystem Assessment and Approaches

Sub-program Description

This program contributes to a consolidated activity that ensures the assessment, evaluation and management of Canada’s ecosystems in a sustainable manner. These diverse components provide scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision-makers across different levels of government, environmental and non-governmental organizations, industry, the research community and the general public. The goal is to ensure that ecosystem information and environmental effects of development proposals can be factored into their decisions. The program conducts research, monitoring, assessment and reporting on the health of ecosystems and biodiversity. It also monitors biodiversity and contaminants as part of the Joint Canada–Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring in order to provide an improved understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of oil sands development. Environment Canada participates in federal environmental assessments, including those in the North, and also contributes scientific expertise in territorial and provincial environmental assessments. EC contributes to the health of Canada’s ecosystems through its involvement in these strategic assessments.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
20,906,91020,375,76219,129,302
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
184174163

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Ecosystem Assessment and Approaches
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Potential significant adverse environmental effects of projects, plans, programs or policies subject to federal environmental assessment legislation and Cabinet Directives are avoided or mitigatedProportion of Environment Canada recommendations that are incorporated into final environmental assessment decisions60%March 2015
Potential significant adverse environmental effects of projects, plans, programs or policies subject to federal environmental assessment legislation and Cabinet Directives are avoided or mitigatedProportion of environmental assessment follow-up requests made by Environment Canada which perform as anticipated100%Fiscal year 2016–17

Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Ecosystem Assessment and Approaches Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to participate in federal environmental assessments as a federal authority and in strategic regional and project assessments to contribute to the health of ecosystems in Canada.
  • Track departmental involvement in processes related to environmental assessments and to reviews of projects on federal lands to ensure reliable access to up-to-date information on the Department’s engagement in projects (approximately 100 each year).

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Sub-Program 1.3.3: Community Engagement

Sub-program Description

This program engages Canadians and communities in protecting and restoring the environment through behavioural change, capacity building, community-based funding programs and engagement activities.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
9,803,4009,800,1599,800,159
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
272726

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Community Engagement
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Increased engagement of Canadians in individual and collective activities to protect, conserve or restore the natural environmentNumber of Canadians engaged in individual and collective actions to protect, conserve or restore the natural environment400,000March 2015

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Community Engagement Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Fund international internships under the International Environmental Youth Corps Program, aimed at fostering and advancing the employability of young adults in the environmental private sector.
  • Fund internships under the Science Horizons Youth Internship Program to increase employment opportunities for post-secondary graduates in environmental science disciplines.
  • Engage Canadians in projects and activities that benefit the natural environment by re-investing funds collected through the Environmental Damages Fund.

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Sub-Program 1.3.4: Ecosystems Initiatives

Sub-program Description

This program advances implementation of an ecosystem approach by providing coordination and oversight for ecosystem initiatives. It responds to growing interest in achieving measurable environmental progress by developing non-regulatory tools and moving beyond jurisdictional concerns. The program seeks to establish and support shared governance mechanisms, as well as to implement grants and contributions programs for clean-up and community projects. It also seeks to manage administrative or other types of funding arrangements as well as partnerships with provinces, the U.S. government, Aboriginal groups or regional stakeholders.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
53,459,14744,868,16625,845,947

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014–152015–162016–17
817761

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Ecosystems Initiatives
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Environment Canada and partners achieve near-term objectives for environmental improvements in ecosystems of national significanceEstimated progress achieved against near-term goals identified in federal-provincial agreements respecting ecosystem initiatives

Great Lakes: 100%

St. Lawrence: 100%

March 2018

March 2016

Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystemsFSDS indicator: Restoring the Great Lakes Areas of ConcernFSDS Target 3.3: Great Lakes Canadian Areas of Concern – Take federal actions to restore beneficial uses for delisting five Canadian Areas of Concern and to reduce the number of impaired beneficial uses in the remaining Areas of Concern by 25% by 2018.2018
Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystemsFSDS indicator: Phosphorus levels in the Great LakesFSDS Target 3.4: Great Lakes – Contribute to the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes by developing and gaining bi-national acceptance of objectives for the management of nutrients in Lake Erie by 2016 and for the other Great Lakes as required.2016
Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystemsFSDS indicator: Phosphorus levels in the St. Lawrence RiverFSDS Target 3.5: St. Lawrence River – Take federal actions to reduce pollutants in order to improve water quality, conserve biodiversity and ensure beneficial uses in the St. Lawrence River by 2016.2016
Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystemsFSDS indicator: Reducing phosphorus loads to Lake SimcoeFSDS Target 3.6: Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay – Reduce an estimated 2000 kg of phosphorus loadings to Lake Simcoe by 2017, which will support the Province of Ontario’s target to reduce phosphorus inputs into Lake Simcoe to 44,000 kg/year by 2045.2017
Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystemsFSDS indicator: Reducing phosphorus loads to Lake SimcoeReduce an estimated 2000 kg of phosphorus loadings to south-eastern Georgian Bay watersheds by 2017.2017
Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems

FSDSindicators:

Nitrogen and phosphorus levels in Lake Winnipeg

Reducing phosphorus loads to Lake Winnipeg

FSDS Target 3.7: Lake Winnipeg Basin – By 2017, reduce phosphorus inputs to water bodies in the Lake Winnipeg Basin, in support of the Province of Manitoba’s overall plan to reduce phosphorus in Lake Winnipeg by 50% to pre-1990 levels.2017

Icon for Theme II (w)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Ecosystems Initiatives Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to implement the Canada-Quebec Agreement on the St. Lawrence 2011–26. In collaboration with 17 departments and agencies from both levels of government, the Department will continue to address the three priority issues in the St. Lawrence: biodiversity conservation; sustainable uses; and water quality.
  • Deliver the Atlantic Ecosystems Initiatives, including continued use of strategic partnerships, research, science, and funding programs to support ecosystem projects and partnerships that advance efforts to conserve and restore important biodiversity and habitat, improve water quality, and better address the impacts of climate change.
  • Continue negotiations under the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative toward a 2014–19 Canada-Ontario Agreement to help deliver Canada’s obligations in the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (2012) (GLWQA). A new Canada-Ontario Agreement will coordinate domestic actions over five years in support of the delivery of Canada’s obligations in the GLWQA. Activities planned for 2014–15 include:
    • Developing (for consultation) draft phosphorus targets for the nearshore and open waters of Lake Erie to achieve toxic and nuisance algae levels in keeping with lake ecosystem objectives.
    • With Public Works and Government Services Canada as the project manager, initiating construction of the Randle Reef Contaminated Sediment Remediation Project in the Hamilton Harbour Area of Concern. To be completed in 2022, the project involves the construction of an engineered containment facility in the harbour, dredging contaminated sediment, and installing an impermeable cap. The facility will then be operated as a port facility by the Hamilton Port Authority.
    • Releasing a report on groundwater science that will identify the impacts of groundwater to the Great Lakes, provide an analysis of contaminants, and assess the need for further scientific analysis (including the potential impact of climate change on groundwater).

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Program 1.4: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife

Program Description

This program works to conserve and protect the natural environment through compliance promotion and enforcement of the Species at Risk Act, the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act, and the Canada Wildlife Act. The program promotes compliance through the communication of information, education and consultation with parties affected by the statutes. It maintains a contingent of enforcement officers, whose activities include verifying conformity and bringing back conformity with laws, regulations and permits pertaining to wildlife and Environment Canada Protected Areas, as well as gathering intelligence, conducting inspections and pursuing investigations regarding alleged offenders. The program also works with the United States and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to strengthen wildlife enforcement. These actions work to reduce damages and threats to biodiversity for the benefit of Canadians and the international community.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
15,821,92615,821,92615,321,59315,356,059
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
122119118

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Program Activity 1.4: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Compliance with wildlife laws and regulations administered by Environment CanadaPercentage of the inspected regulated community that is compliant with regulatory requirements under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 199490%March 2015

Icon for Theme III (n) Planning Highlights
(See also Program 3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution.)

In 2014–15, through the Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife Program, the Department will:

  • Make ongoing improvements to the Department’s Web presence to better promote compliance with regulatory requirements, to create clearfix, consistent and easily searchable information about environmental requirements.
  • Continue to partner and collaborate on policy development with other federal departments to enhance enforcement capabilities in the North.
  • Deploy the first phase of a new enforcement information system and the centralization of data to support the Department’s compliance promotion and enforcement activities.
  • Identify enforcement priority areas in consultation with experts and partners, as well as through consideration of data collected through inspections, investigations and intelligence. The Department will also address operational issues requiring attention to ensure fair and predictable law enforcement across the country.
  • Continue to develop an administrative monetary penalties system provided for under the Environmental Violations Administrative Monetary Penalties Act through which the federal government delivers on its commitment to bolster protection of water, air, land, and wildlife through more effective enforcement.

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Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

Performance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Weather Warning Index (a weighted index of weather warning timeliness and accuracy)7.6 out of 10July 2015

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Program 2.1: Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Program Description

This program provides reliable, accurate and timely forecasts and warnings, as well as weather and environmental intelligence, to anticipate, manage and adapt to the risks and opportunities of changing weather, water, air quality and climate conditions. It involves monitoring, research, prediction and service delivery, based on sound science, to help Canadians make informed decisions to protect their health, safety, security and economic prosperity. Because a global effort is needed to monitor, understand and predict constantly changing weather, water, air quality, sea, ice and climate conditions, the program works with various collaborators in Canada and around the world. Key partners include the World Meteorological Organization of the United Nations and its Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, as well as the news media, academia and all levels of government in Canada. The program meets the Department’s responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, the Weather Modification Information Act, the Emergency Management Act (2007), the Convention of the World Meteorological Organization, and memoranda of agreement with national meteorological and space agencies. It provides forecasts and information in case of environmental emergencies associated with the release of toxic and radioactive material in the atmosphere. Grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians are used as components of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
165,962,548165,962,548170,289,173143,157,785

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
1,0771,053953

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Program 2.1: Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Canadians use Environment Canada's weather and environmental servicesPercentage of the population of a warned area who report having seen or heard a recent weather warning and who took actions in response30%July 2016
Canadians understand information on the changing weather, water and climate conditions and the associated health and safety risksPercentage of the population who understand wind chill informationTarget to be determinedTo be determined
Canadians understand information on the changing weather, water and climate conditions and the associated health and safety risksPercentage of targeted sensitive populations within selected regions receiving information on the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) who a) identify potential behaviour changes in response to current and/or forecast AQHI levels that are consistent with health messaging and/or b) identify actual behaviour changes in response to current and/or forecast AQHI levels that are consistent with health messaging10% to 20% of sensitive population (range is due to regional variation)March 2016

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians Program, Environment Canada will:

  • Continue to support the federal government’s policy agenda, including emergency management, the North, and climate and water services. 
  • Progress with improvements and upgrades to the weather monitoring infrastructure and modernizing equipment in all key networks to support timely, accurate and accessible weather information to Canadians.
  • Continue to implement projects that contribute to internal transformation to support better availability of monitoring data and weather prediction.
  • Expand and improve the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) service, to support better air quality forecasts in support of Canadians’ health.
  • Make available a range of climate data and models, focusing products and services offered to specialized and international users.
  • Maintain capacity for supercomputing and mission-critical information technology services through ongoing collaboration with Shared Services Canada.
  • Enhance and maintain international partnerships and collaboration, and contribute to international initiatives through monitoring, and provision of data and expert advice.

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Sub-Program 2.1.1: Weather, Observations, Forecasts and Warnings

Sub-program Description

This program provides all-day, every-day weather warnings, forecasts and information with lead times of minutes to weeks. Its purpose is to help Canadians anticipate dangerous meteorological events so they have enough time to protect themselves and their property. Program activities combine research in science and modelling with regional monitoring, prediction and service delivery. These activities depend on the supercomputing capacity managed by Shared Services Canada. The program is delivered through collaborations involving data, science and information distribution in Canada and internationally. Key partners are the news media, all levels of government and academia in Canada, other national meteorological services, research and space agencies, and the United Nations World Meteorological Organization (WMO), to which this program contributes about $2 million annually in support of Canada’s international commitments in meteorology and hydrology. It meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act and Weather Modification Information Act and supports other departments acting under the Emergency Management Act (2007). Program delivery includes assessed contribution to the WMO and may include Grants and Contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
134,203,251138,638,182118,675,684

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–152015–162016–17
811791745

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Canadians have the information they need on current and changing weather conditionsPercentage of the population who report that they are somewhat or very likely to access weather information during a typical day90%July 2016
Canadians have the information they need on current and changing weather conditionsPercentage of the population who indicate that weather forecasts are "always" or "usually" useful85%March 2015

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Build on work underway to improve and update monitoring infrastructure through lifecycle management and modernizing equipment in the radar, surface, marine, upper air and lightning networks. Efforts will support improved capacity to observe, diagnose and predict severe weather, and address emerging infrastructure challenges (e.g., replacing helium-based monitoring systems with hydrogen-based systems).
  • Continue key internal transformative projects, including: implementing a network of networks approach among stakeholders to increase availability of monitoring data; advancing the Next Generation Weather Prediction System; and modernizing the weather warning and forecast system.
  • Prepare to support the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games (Toronto), with up-to-date and high quality information on severe weather and environmental events.
  • Continue to conduct meteorological research and development to improve weather and environmental prediction, and publish results of this research in the scientific literature.  
  • Engage with multilateral partners, such as the World Meteorological Organization, the Group on Earth Observations and major national meteorological and hydrological organizations, enabling Canada to benefit from science information and technologies developed abroad.

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Sub-Program 2.1.2: Health-related Meteorological Information

Sub-program Description

This program provides forecasts, tools and information on atmospheric conditions that affect health, such as air quality, extreme temperatures and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It supports the mandates of Environment Canada, Health Canada and many public and non-governmental health agencies. The program includes work on the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) and other projects that assist Canadians in making informed decisions to protect their health and reduce pollution, and enable health agencies to help vulnerable populations to respond to changing atmospheric conditions. It is delivered across Canada through collaborations promoting data and information dissemination. Collaborators include the media, public health agencies at all levels of government, provincial environment agencies and non-governmental agencies. This program also includes conducting systematic observations and monitoring of background air pollutant monitoring (CAPMon Network) and ozone in the atmosphere and hosting the World Ozone and UV Data Centre, operated on behalf of the World Meteorological Organization and used by over 75 government agencies around the world. Program delivery may include grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
11,462,67711,478,5734,744,951

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
868536

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.1.2:Health-related Meteorological Information
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Canadians have the information they need to protect their health against risks related to air quality and other atmospheric conditionsPercentage of targeted sensitive populations within selected regions receiving information on the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) who report that they recall seeing or hearing AQHI information15 to 25% of sensitive population (range is due to regional variation)March 2016
Canadians have the information they need to protect their health against risks related to air quality and other atmospheric conditionsPercentage of the general population within selected regions receiving Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) who report that they recall seeing or hearing AQHI information15 to 20% of general population (range is due to regional variation)March 2016

Icon for Theme I (a)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Health-related Meteorological Information Sub-Program, the Department will: 

  • Continue the expansion of the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) service, with a focus on northern communities, including implementing the AQHI in Iqaluit, NU and Inuvik, NT.
  • Continue to refine techniques to combine observational data and model predictive values to produce scientifically rigorous maps of fine particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide and AQHI values, to better protect the health of Canadians.
  • Pilot Firework, an initiative for capturing wildfire emissions in the operational air quality forecast model.
  • Enhance Air Quality Health Index forecasts for the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games, through improvements to both the spatial resolution and chemical processes in the air quality model.
  • Track changes in the stratospheric ozone layer, continue to maintain the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre and the World Brewer Calibration Centre for the global scientific community, and provide knowledge and data to the 2014 World Meteorological Organization/United Nations Environment Programme Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion.

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Sub-Program 2.1.3: Climate Information, Predictions and Tools

Sub-program Description

This program generates new knowledge and information about past, present and future states of the climate system and how it functions, as well as the changing composition of the atmosphere and its impacts. Its work includes developing global and regional climate models and scenarios; detecting human influence on climate change in Canada, including extremes; understanding the North and Canadian cryosphere; and tracking atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases and aerosols across Canada, including in remote locations. These activities increase understanding of the impacts of climate change on economic sectors and ecosystems. Results from the program’s analysis and research activities provide the scientific basis for policy development, mitigation, adaptation planning and decision-making to programs such as the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework, as well as products, services and tools to Canadians. In particular, climate services inform and assist users in adapting to both present climate variability and medium- to long-term changes in climate. The program shares data, science and information with all levels of government in Canada, academia, industry, consortia, standards councils, and the national and international scientific community, including organizations such as the World Meteorological Organization, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society. The program meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, Canadian Environmental Protection Act (1999), Emergency Management Act (2007) and the National Research Council Act (Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes), and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (Articles 4 and 5: monitoring and research). Program delivery may include grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
20,296,62020,172,41819,737,150
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
180177172

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.1.3: Climate Information, Predictions and Tools
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Clients and users have the information they require on climate projections, scenarios and climate data sets on various time and spatial scalesAnnual number of downloads of climate datasets25,000March 2015
Icon for Theme I (a)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 1: Climate Change – Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate changeFSDS indicator: Measuring adaptation is complex given the broad nature and scope of potential impacts. In the short term, measurement for the FSDSwill focus on measures of the performance of specific government actions which are expected to be available for inclusion in the next FSDS Progress Report. These may be complemented in the future by additional indicators that measure adaptation outcomes for Canada more broadlyFSDS Target 1.2: Climate Change Adaptation – Facilitate reduced vulnerability of individuals, communities, regions and economic sectors to the impacts of climate change through the development and provision of information and tools.March 2015

Icon for Theme I (a)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Climate Information, Predictions and Tools Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to provide high quality climate data and services to the public and key clients, including through key websites: Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Canadian Climate Change Scenarios Network, Adjusted and Homogenized Canadian Climate Data, and Climate.weather.gc.ca.
  • Provide ongoing support to the application of building codes in Canada and internationally, including providing information on wind and snow loads, and temperature and precipitation extremes to support application of the National Building Code of Canada.  
  • Enhance the information accessible through the Canadian Climate Change Scenarios Network, and improve regional climate models to deliver climate projections at higher spatial resolution for North American and the Arctic.
  • Develop a climate services strategy to explore potential for developing additional products and services.
  • Contribute to the implementation of the Global Framework for Climate Services at the international, national and regional levels, including to enhanced delivery of climate services in support of climate adaptation in Canada.
  • Participate, together with university partners, in the field research campaigns funded through the first full year of engagement in the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council’s Climate Change and Atmospheric Research (CCAR) networks.
  • Publish in scientific literature new knowledge on a number of issues of relevance to the Department: global and regional climate modelling experiments; detection of human influence on climate change; analysis of trends and variability in the climate system; understanding climate trends in the North and Canadian cryosphere (snow and ice); and the role of greenhouse gases and aerosols in the climate system.
  • Contribute to international climate assessments.

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Program 2.2: Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users

Program Description

This program provides reliable, accurate and timely forecasts and warnings, as well as weather and environmental intelligence, to anticipate, manage and adapt to the risks and opportunities of changing weather, water, air quality and climate conditions. It involves monitoring, research, prediction and service delivery, based on sound science, to help Canadians make informed decisions to protect their health, safety, security and economic prosperity. Because a global effort is needed to monitor, understand and predict constantly changing weather, water, air quality, sea ice and climate conditions, the program works with various collaborators in Canada and around the world. Key partners include the World Meteorological Organization of the United Nations and its Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, as well as the news media, academia and all levels of government in Canada. The program meets the Department’s responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, the Weather Modification Information Act, the Emergency Management Act (2007),the Convention of the World Meteorological Organization,and memoranda of agreement with national meteorological and space agencies. It provides forecasts and information in case of environmental emergencies associated with the release of toxic and radioactive material in the atmosphere. Grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians are used as components of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
25,266,28025,266,28020,608,91218,816,401

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
464426415

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Program 2.2: Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Targeted sectors have the meteorological and environmental information and services they need to operate efficiently and safelyCombined level of satisfaction of the main clients of the Meteorological Service of Canada (MSC) based on the statement "The services provided by the MSC meet our needs"7.5 out of 10March 2015

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to deliver tailored services to targeted users, including NAV CANADA, Transport Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, the National Defence and a variety of economic and commercial sectors. 
  • Provide enhanced weather and ice information in Canada’s North in collaboration with the Canadian Coast Guard, National Defence and others, and continue with research to support these efforts.
  • Continue to leverage investments in Program 2.1 (Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians) by ensuring that signature and other transformative products, such as the Next Generation Forecast System, are designed and implemented as an integrated system. This will support the efficient retirement of obsolete tools, such as legacy software, and enable new forecasting techniques and concepts to be applied fully to meet targeted user requirements.

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Sub-Program 2.2.1: Meteorological Services in Support of Air Navigation

Sub-program Description

This program provides the aviation industry and its regulatory agency with meteorological services (observations, forecasts and warnings) all day and every day of the year. It supports the goals and missions of NAV CANADA and Transport Canada, and supports the domestic and international airlines operating in Canadian territory to make tactical decisions to maximize their efficiency, effectiveness and safety. The program also includes the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), one of nine such centres around the world operating under the authority of the International Civil Aviation Organization. The VAAC forecasts the transport of airborne volcanic ash to reduce the risk of aircraft disasters, and provides operational support and backup to other VAACs worldwide. The program is delivered under a contract between Environment Canada and NAV CANADA.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
4,695,2434,695,2434,695,244
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
163160158

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Meteorological services in support of air navigation
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
NAV CANADA and the aviation industry have the meteorological information and services they need to maximize their efficiency and aviation safetyOverall client satisfaction index, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent)7.5 out of 10March 2015

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Meteorological Services in Support of Air Navigation Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to provide high-quality, relevant and timely aviation weather forecasts and services to NAV CANADA.
  • Update program production tools and techniques to capitalize on advancements in production methods, such as promoting the automation of forecasting tools, and improved data transfer technology.  

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Sub-Program 2.2.2: Meteorological and Ice Services in Support of Marine Navigation

Sub-program Description

This program provides marine industries and regulatory agencies with forecasts of the sea state, ice conditions and weather all day and every day of the year. It supports the International Maritime Organization by providing meteorological information for Canadian and international Arctic waters. It also supports the goals and mandates of the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The program also helps marine industries and other interests operating in Canadian waters, including organizations involved in shipping, fisheries and resource extraction, to make tactical decisions, such as ship routing, to maximize their safety and efficiency. As a key collaborator, the CCG broadcasts information related to this program to marine interests, as well as providing in-situ weather, sea-state and ice information to Environment Canada. This program is operated in part through a memorandum of understanding with Fisheries and Oceans for services related to current and forecast ice conditions over Canadian navigable waters. The program meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, the Oceans Act and the Fisheries Act. It also supports commitments to the International Convention on Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System, and the North American Ice Service.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
12,309,7157,773,7857,773,785

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
157123122

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Meteorological and Ice services in support of marine navigation
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Marine communities have the weather, wave and ice information they need to operate safely and efficiently in Canadian watersPercentage of mariners who indicate satisfaction with the available products, including ability to access this informationTarget to be determined once a baseline value is measured (in 2014)To be determined
Marine communities have the weather, wave and ice information they need to operate safely and efficiently in Canadian watersPercentage of clients and organizations within the targeted sector who report that they have factored ice information into their decisionsTarget to be determined once a baseline value is measured (in 2014)To be determined

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Meteorological and Ice Services in Support of Marine Navigation Sub-Program, the Department will:  

  • Continue to collaborate with domestic and international partners to develop seamless products and enhance services – including those compatible with electronic marine navigation systems.
  • Renew collaborative arrangements with the Canadian Coast Guard for continued provision of marine weather and ice information to support safe marine transportation for its activities, particularly in the North.
  • Complete implementation of an integrated marine weather and ice service for international waters in the Arctic.
  • Pursue research and development to improve current models for weather and ice monitoring and toward development of a new model – the first high resolution atmosphere-ocean-ice coupled model for the Arctic and the North Atlantic. The new model will better predict sea ice concentration, sea ice velocity, internal ice pressure and ocean currents.

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Sub-Program 2.2.3: Meteorological Services in Support of Military Operations

Sub-program Description

This program provides the Department of National Defence (DND) with meteorological and oceanographic information, predictions and tools needed for operations of the Canadian Forces (CF) in Canada and abroad. It is a collaborative program, operating under a formal memorandum of understanding with DND, responding to CF-specific needs and recovering its incremental costs from DND. This program is critical to CF operations, contributing to the effectiveness and safety of tactical, operational and strategic manoeuvres within Canada and in various active military areas globally. It also supports DND’s legal and statutory responsibilities under the Aeronautics Act, which is the legal foundation for military aviation safety.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2,935,2002,935,2002,935,200
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
105104102

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Meteorological services in support of Military operations
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
The Department of National Defence has the meteorological and oceanographic information and knowledge it needs to optimize its operations in Canada and abroadClient satisfaction index, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent), that combines input from survey data and DND management feedback7.0 out of 10March 2015

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Meteorological Services in Support of Military Operations Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Provide weather services to DND in Canada and around the world.
  • Work to achieve full operational capability of the new Joint Meteorological Centre at Canadian Forces Base Gagetown (New Brunswick).
  • Collaborate domestically and internationally with DND stakeholders and with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) to develop targeted products and services for efficient military operations.
  • Enhance Canadian collaboration with DND and other federal departments in Arctic areas to: support (where possible) cost effective solutions for the deployment of equipment; support important emergency management planning and exercises; and determine emerging areas for enhanced services. 

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Sub-Program 2.2.4: Meteorological Services for Economic and Commercial Sectors

Sub-program Description

This program provides a variety of economic and commercial sectors (such as news media, natural resources sectors and specialized users) with climate and meteorological services, including data from the Canadian Lightning Detection Network. The information and tools are used to make tactical and strategic decisions that maximize economic and commercial efficiency, competitiveness, environmental performance and safety in the short and longer term. In doing so, the program supports the mandates of Natural Resources Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and others (such as provincial agencies). Many economic sectors are sensitive to changing weather and climate with respect to the safety and cost-effectiveness of their operations (e.g., just-in-time delivery, pest management), the demand for their services (e.g., hydro-electrical generation) and the future of their industry. Specialized data services allow users to obtain pertinent information through such mechanisms as specialized data links or one-on-one consultations. This program is delivered across Canada through collaborations involving data and science, often on a cost-shared or cost-recovered basis.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
5,326,1225,204,6843,412,172

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
393933

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 2.2.4: Meteorological services for economic and commercial sectors
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Targeted Canadian economic sectors have the meteorological information they need for their decision makingSatisfaction level of the media with respect to the services provided by Environment Canada, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent)7.5 out of 10March 2015

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Meteorological Services for Economic and Commercial Sectors Sub-Program, the Department will:  

  • Explore opportunities with the electricity sector to expand the use of lightning information from the Environment Canada National Lightning Detection Network
  • Continue to expand available datasets to meet the growing needs of specialized users, notably through the Meteorological Service of Canada’s Datamart.

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Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Performance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Canadian emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide equivalents) in megatonnesPerformance Measurement Framework  target: Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 17% by 20202020

Icon for Theme I (a)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 1: Climate Change – Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change

FSDS indicator: Expected impact of actions to meet the reduction target

FSDS Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation – Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 17% by 2020.2020

Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations

  1. 24-hour average
  2. Annual average

2015 Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for fine particulate matter (PM2.5):

  1. 28 µg/m3
  2. 10 µg/m3
December 2015
Ambient ground-level ozone concentrations (8-hour average)2015 Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard for ground-level ozone of 63 ppbDecember 2015

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Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

Program Description

Activities in this program reduce threats to health and the environment posed by pollution and waste from human activities. The program assesses risks to the environment from substances that are already in commercial use (existing substances) and substances proposed for use in Canada (new substances). It also develops and implements measures to prevent or manage the risks from these substances and waste. Contributions in support of Substances and Waste Management are used as a component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
75,747,78975,747,78973,834,43244,042,633

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
628615430

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTargetsDate to be achieved
Threats to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by harmful substances and waste are reducedPercentage of drainage regions where Canadian or Federal Environmental Quality Guidelines are not exceeded for selected substances in sediment, water and/or biota

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs):

80% in all sampled media

Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS):

80% in all sampled media

September 2013 (to be reported in the 2014-15 DPR)

September 2014 (To be reported in the 2015-16 DPR)

Icon for Theme III (n)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to comePercentage of drainage regions where Canadian or Federal Environmental Quality Guidelines are not exceeded for selected substances in sediment, water and/or biotaFSDS Target 4.8:  Chemicals Management – Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substances.Footnote 3

September 2013 (to be reported in the 2014-15 DPR)

September 2014 (To be reported in the 2015-16 DPR)

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Substances and Waste Management Program, Environment Canada will: 

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Sub-Program 3.1.1: Substances Management

Sub-program Description

This program is jointly implemented by Health Canada and Environment Canada. It is responsible for assessing all targeted existing commercial substances identified under the Chemicals Management Plan, as well as new substances, upon notification by industry of their import or manufacture, for risks to the environment. The program uses science-based risk assessment, priority-setting and timely regulatory actions (or other measures where appropriate) to manage these substances. It works to improve substance management through research and monitoring, and tracking of pollutant releases through reporting to the National Pollutant Release Inventory and ensures appropriate risk measures are in place, as well as engaging in national and international collaborations. The program maintains transparency with stakeholders through consultation processes. International obligations include the Basel, Rotterdam Convention and Stockholm Conventions, the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution and the Minamata Convention. Program delivery includes the assessed contribution to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. This program also uses regulations and other control measures to address the risks posed by end-of-life substances of concern, international and interprovincial movement of waste and hazardous recyclable material.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
49,328,82349,398,85927,338,252

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
410404270

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Substances Management
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Reduced releases to the environment of toxic and other substances of concernCanadian releases of selected controlled substancesIsoprene:  80% reduction relative to the 2009 baselineMarch 2016
Icon for Theme III (n)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to comeFSDS indicator:  Reduce releases of harmful substances (mercury, cadmium, lead and isoprene) to the environmentFSDS Target 4.8:  Chemicals Management – Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substancesFootnote 4.March 2016

Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Substances Management Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Conduct targeted research on priority substances and issues under the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) and the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) and publish draft and/or final assessments of existing substances flagged for future consideration on the CMP website.
  • Assess the 450 notified new chemicals, nanomaterials and products of biotechnology prior to their introduction into Canada and intervene as early as possible when the assessment identifies a risk to human health or the environment.
  • Carry out integrated environmental monitoring and surveillance of priority chemicals in air, water, sediment, fish, birds and wastewater to detect and characterize environmental change.
  • Continue to develop, implement and administer risk management control instruments (such as regulations and codes of practice) to manage risk from harmful substances.
  • Track and report through the National Pollutant Release Inventory information on releases, disposals and recycling of over 300 substances of concern.
  • Participate in a range of international initiatives that support domestic efforts in the sound management of chemicals.
  • Identify and implement best waste management practices to reduce releases of toxic substances, in collaboration with the provinces and territories, and others.
  • Continue to develop modern information technology and information management solutions for program delivery, including an electronic reporting system for hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable materials.

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Sub-Program 3.1.2: Effluent Management

Sub-program Description

This program manages the risks to the environment and human health from the discharge and deposit of waste residues (e.g., effluent). It does this by developing, implementing and administering strategies and programs, such as pollution prevention plans, regulations, codes of practice, guidelines and environmental performance agreements. It works under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, and the Fisheries Act to address waste discharges and substances of concern from industrial and public sectors, including but not limited to the mining and processing, forestry, waste water and other sectors. Key activities include conducting research and risk analysis; developing and implementing regulations and other control instruments; assessing the results of environmental effects monitoring of regulated facilities; providing technical advice to environmental assessments; and acting as the focal point for the Department for the Fisheries Act Pollution Prevention Provisions (FA-PPP). Specifically, the program administers the FA-PPP, including the development of risk management instruments; administers the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations to reduce the threats to fish, fish habitat and human health from fish consumption; works with the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Quebec, and Newfoundland and Labrador on minimum effluent quality standards for wastewater effluent for the Far North; works to amend the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations to include the Far North, and administers the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations and the Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations under the Fisheries Act to control or manage the deposit of deleterious substances into water to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
7,179,2946,893,0026,893,002
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
777473

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Effluent Management
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Prevention of effluent pollution from sectors regulated under the Fisheries ActPercentage of facilities whose releases are within regulated limits and meet effluent non-lethality requirement95%March 2015
Prevention of effluent pollution from sectors regulated under the Fisheries ActLoading (in tonnes) of biological oxygen demand (BOD) matter and total suspended solids from wastewater treatment facilities subject to federal regulationsPerformance Measurement Framework target to be determined (in 2015)To be determined
Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems

FSDSindicators:

Metal mining effluent quality – percentage of facilities whose releases achieve regulatory limits

Pulp and paper effluent quality – percentage of facilities whose releases achieve regulatory limits

FSDS Target 3.11:  Wastewater and Industrial Effluent – Reduce risks associated with effluent from wastewater (sewage) and industrial sectors by 2020.2020
Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems

FSDSindicators:

Wastewater effluent quality – percentage of wastewater systems whose releases achieve regulatory limits

Wastewater effluent loading – loading of biological oxygen demand matter and suspended solids

FSDS Target 3.11:  Wastewater and Industrial Effluent – Reduce risks associated with effluent from wastewater (sewage) and industrial sectors by 2020.2020

Icon for Theme II (w)Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Effluent Management Sub-Program, the Department will: 

  • Continue work to expand the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations to include diamond and coal mines through multi-stakeholder consultations to seek input on proposed changes to the regulations.
  • Continue to implement the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations and work with provinces and territories to streamline their administration and avoid duplication wherever possible through bilateral agreements.
  • Work with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to enable a more efficient and streamlined administration of the Fisheries Act.

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Sub-Program 3.1.3: Marine Pollution

Sub-program Description

This program assesses, controls and monitors the disposal of wastes and other matter at sea and advises on marine pollution from ships. Since 2010, the program also has responsibility for assessing and controlling the risk of impacts to the marine environment resulting from Canadians or Canadian maritime traffic in the Antarctic. The program uses a mix of regulatory and non-regulatory instruments to prevent marine pollution. It addresses impacts on sediments and other wastes; administers prohibitions and controls, assesses and issues permits for disposal at sea and Antarctic expeditions; and researches and develops decision‑making and monitoring tools, and standards. The program contributes to federal coordination of marine pollution prevention (ship-sourced); It works under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, including Part 7, Division 3 (Disposal at Sea), and the Antarctic Environmental Protection Act, 2003. The program also meets international obligations, including the London Convention and Protocol, the Antarctic Treaty and Madrid Protocol, and works to advance Canadian positions to influence global rules toward reducing and managing global marine pollution from all sources. Two cost recovery fees are applicable to disposal at sea permits: an application fee assessed on all permits, and a permit fee assessed on dredged and inert inorganic material.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
1,191,3701,191,3701,191,370
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
202020

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Marine Pollution
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorTargetsDate to be achieved
Reduced marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at seaPercentage of disposal site monitoring events that do not require site management actionPerformance Measurement Framework target: 85%March 2015
Icon for Theme II (w)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity – Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystemsPercentage of disposal site monitoring events that do not require site management actionFSDS Target 3.9: Marine Pollution – Disposal at Sea – Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable, such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure) from 2013-16.2016

Icon for Theme II (w)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Marine Pollution Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Continue to make improvements in the delivery of and guidance for the Disposal at Seaprogram.
  • Commence implementation in Canada of the London Protocol amendment to regulate placement at sea of objects for the purposes of marine geoengineering, including ocean fertilization.
  • Continue to improve the processes and guidance that support permit applications, processes and assessments.   

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Sub-Program 3.1.4: Environmental Emergencies

Sub-program Description

This program aims to reduce the frequency and consequences of spills and related environmental emergencies involving toxic and other hazardous substances. The program conducts five major activities: prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and research and development. Prevention involves regulating chemical facilities to develop and implement environmental emergency plans. Preparedness includes coordinating and planning international, national and regional environmental emergency preparedness capabilities, as well as sensitivity mapping. Response includes monitoring the actions of responsible parties, providing scientific and technical advice on weather and sea state, and on behaviour and effects of chemicals; providing sensitivity mapping and trajectory modelling; attending significant incidents; and operating the 24/7 National Environmental Emergencies Centre in Montréal. Recovery activities include assessing the damage and providing advice to polluters on repairing an environment damaged by an environmental emergency. Other activities include development of spill models, analysis methods, fate and behaviour algorithms, measurement and remote‑sensing capabilities, decontamination protocols and counter-measures used during incidents.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
10,223,3589,439,2906,746,690
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
797766

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.4: Environmental Emergencies
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Regulatees comply with the requirements and obligations of the Environmental Emergency RegulationsPercentage of facilities requiring environmental emergency plans that have them in place as required by the Environmental Emergency Regulations100%March 2015
Stable or reduced frequency of environmental emergencies in facilities subject to the Environmental Emergency RegulationsPercentage of regulated facilities subject to the Environmental Emergency regulations and that have an E2 plan that have environmental emergenciesLess than 1%March 2015
Icon for Theme III (n)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat and Protecting Canadians – Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to comeFSDS indicator: Number of environmental emergencies at facilities subject to environmental emergency regulationsFSDS Target 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies – Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies are prevented or their impacts mitigated.Footnote 5March 2015

Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Environmental Emergencies Sub-Program, the Department will:     

  • Implement the Environmental Emergency Regulations, the Notifications Regulations (under Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and the Fisheries Act) and the associated notification agreements that enable the timely transfer of pollution incident information to the Department.
  • Develop proposals to amend the Environmental Emergency Regulations (to add substances and improve industry requirements for the prevention of, preparation for, response to, and recovery from environmental emergencies).
  • Commence renegotiation and amendments to formal agreements with provinces and territories with respect to the forwarding to Environment Canada of notifications of spills and releases of substances.

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Sub-Program 3.1.5: Contaminated Sites

Sub-program Description

This program is primarily directed to Environment Canada’s responsibilities in supporting the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP). The FCSAPis a 15-year Government of Canada horizontal program with the aim of reducing environmental and human health risks from known federal contaminated sites and associated federal financial liabilities. Sixteen federal departments, agencies and consolidated Crown corporations responsible for contaminated sites, including Environment Canada, are currently involved in the FCSAP program as custodians of sites. The Contaminated Sites Program responsibilities include hosting the FCSAP Secretariat, developing guidance and program policies, and providing expert support to federal custodians for the assessment and remediation/risk management activities at their sites. In addition, the FCSAP Secretariat coordinates the implementation of the Shared Sites Policy Framework. Under the Contaminated Sites Program, Environment Canada also provides technical and scientific advice to the custodial department responsible for the Sydney Tar Ponds project.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
7,824,9446,911,9111,873,319

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
42402

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.1.5: Contaminated Sites
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Reduced liability at higher-risk federal contaminated sitesReduction in liability at all Class 1 and Class 2 Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) funded sites during Phase II of FCSAP$1.17 billionMarch 2016
Reduced risk to the environment and human health from federal contaminated sitesNumber of Class 1 and Class 2 Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) funded sites where risk reduction activities have been completed368 sitesMarch 2016

Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Contaminated Sites Sub-Program, the Department will: 

  • Provide program oversight for the ongoing delivery of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) in partnership with other federal departments and agencies and consolidated Crown corporations.
  • Analyze funding needs to ensure that funding is allocated to the highest priority sites and develop a proposal for the renewal of FCSAP (Phase III, 2016–17 to 2019–20).
  • Track and communicate program performance to the public, and recommend policies and procedures for consideration by FCSAP governance committees.
  • Provide expert advice to help federal custodians assess and remediate their contaminated sites to ensure that the highest priority sites are remediated under FCSAP and to reduce the ecological risks posed by their contaminated sites.   
  • Provide site-specific guidance to improve risk reduction and provide guidance and training to custodians.
  • Continue to assess and remediate sites for which Environment Canada is responsible. 

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Program 3.2: Climate Change and Clean Air

Program Description

This program aims to protect the health of Canadians, the state of the environment and Canada’s economy from the harmful effects of air pollutants and the impacts of GHG emissions through the development and implementation of regulations and other control measures. Actions are based on sound scientific and economic analysis, and emissions monitoring and reporting. Work under this program involves continued collaboration with other governments and stakeholders; expert environmental science and technology advice, assessment, and program management in support of technology investment decisions, policy-making and regulations; and cooperation with the U.S. to align GHG regulations as appropriate, reduce transboundary air pollution and advance the development of clean technologies. It also involves participation, negotiations and contributions to international fora to address climate change and transboundary air pollution, and bilateral and multilateral processes in order to support Canada’s positions and objectives. This program includes contributions in support of climate change and clean air, and grants for the implementation of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
154,813,450234,152,193117,621,92554,823,824

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
699688338

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Program 3.2: Climate Change and Clean Air
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Threats to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are minimizedAggregate emissions of greenhouse gases from targeted and/or regulated sourcesCanada’s national target is a 17% reduction from 2005 levels2020
Threats to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are minimizedCanadian emissions of air pollutants from targeted sourcesPerformance Measurement Framework target: Decline in the 3-year moving average for all tracked substancesMarch 2015
Icon for Theme I (a)Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 2: Air Pollution – Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystemsFSDS indicator: Air emissions indicators of sulphur oxides, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and ammoniaFSDS Target 2.1: Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020 and thus reducing emissions of air pollutants in support of AQMS objectives.2020

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Climate Change and Clean Air Program, the Department will:

  • Engage in international fora to measure, monitor and address short-lived climate pollutants, including under the Arctic Council and the Climate and Clean Air Coalition.
  • Continue to develop regulations in support of the sector-by-sector approach to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This work will build on achievements to date towards Canada’s commitment to reduce GHG emissions.
  • Continue to work with the provinces and territories on the implementation of the Air Quality Management System (AQMS).
  • Continue to develop regulatory and non-regulatory measures to reduce the emissions of air pollutants from the major industrial sectors.
  • Support alignment of standards for emissions with more stringent standards of the United States for vehicles and engines.
  • Further the development of a single, harmonized on-line system for reporting on greenhouse gases and air pollutant emissions, and continue to meet Canada’s international obligations for reporting on greenhouse gas emissions from industrial facilities. 
  • Maintain: the National Pollutant Release Inventory, including meeting requirements for reporting on air pollutant releases, and the publication of Canada’s Air Pollutant Emissions Inventory; the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (including meeting the requirements for publishing GHGemissions from industrial facilities); and the annual National GHG Inventory and trends report, to meet domestic and international reporting requirements. 

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Sub-Program 3.2.1: Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program

Sub-program Description

This program develops domestic approaches to climate change and air pollution by controlling emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air pollutants, and promotes science-based approaches to develop new standards and regulations. Core program activities focus on developing and implementing regulations to achieve the reduction of emissions from the industrial, transportation, and consumer and commercial products sectors while maintaining economic competitiveness. The program also involves analysis related to cross-cutting issues, compliance flexibilities, and equivalency agreements with provinces, as well as consultations with industry, provincial and territorial governments, and other stakeholders. The program works with provinces and territories through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment and is implementing the new Air Quality Management System, which includes establishing new outdoor air quality standards, implementing the industrial emission requirements. The program also works with other jurisdictions, including the U.S., to undertake regional and international efforts to manage transboundary air pollution. The program’s core activities are supported by legal and economic analysis, as well as scientific research, monitoring and modelling on the impacts of air pollution, which provide a basis to develop, implement and evaluate standards and regulations. The program involves data collection, emissions estimation and reporting to support domestic programs and meet international requirements. This includes: the design and implementation of the Single Window Reporting Initiative to provide a single harmonized system to report on GHG and air pollutant emissions; the maintenance of the GHGEmissions Reporting Program to track progress in GHG emission reduction; the estimation of emissions and removals for GHGs and the development, submission, and publication of the annual National GHG Inventory Report and Canada’s Air Pollutant Emissions Inventory; and, the submission of emission data to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe and to the United States to meet commitments under the Ozone Annex and assess general performance reducing air pollutant emissions.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
95,534,50192,896,63735,877,758

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
609599284

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Reduced emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases from regulated and/or targeted sectorsCanadian industrial emissions of: total particulate matter (TPM); sulphur dioxide (SO2); nitrogen oxides (NOx); volatile organic compounds (VOC), mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3)To be determined with the finalization of the regulationsTo be determined
Reduced emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases from regulated and/or targeted sectorsCanadian transportation emissions of: particulate matter (PM10); nitrogen oxides (NOx); and volatile organic compounds (VOC)Decline of total emissionsMarch 2015
Reduced emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases from regulated and/or targeted sectorsCanadian emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide equivalents) in megatonnes (MT) from industrial and mobile sourcesTo be determined by sector-specific approach to addressing climate changeTo be determined

Icon for Theme I (a)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Sub-Program, the Department will:   

  • Finalize Regulations Amending the Passenger Automobile and Light Truck Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations, and continue to develop draft regulations for other sectors.
  • Maintain GHG and air pollutant inventories to meet both international and domestic reporting requirements, and improve the regional perspective of GHG sources and sinks in Canada.
  • Continue work with interested provinces to develop equivalency agreements for GHG and air pollutant regulations, and manage and expand the Department’s Single Window Reporting System for regulatory reporting of air emissions–including GHGs, air pollutants and chemical substances.
  • Continue to develop the draft Multi-Sectoral Air Pollutants Regulations (MSAPR) to implement the Base-Level Industrial Emission Requirements (BLIERs) of the AQMS.
  • Establish more stringent air pollution standards for new cars, trucks and some heavy-duty vehicles and continue work to amend the reduce the sulphur content in gasoline.
  • Continue assessments of the environmental impacts of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) emissions in Canada and consult with stakeholders to update the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for these pollutants.  
  • Continue to provide high quality monitoring data and expertise in support of the Air Quality Management System (AQMS) (and its current and planned Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards and related assessments), the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement and other international obligations.
  • Publish in scientific literature new knowledge on air quality research on: air pollutants; multi-scale air quality forecast models; climate research; and the first comprehensive Canadian Mercury Science Assessment.
  • Continue to cooperate with the Government of Alberta and local stakeholders to implement the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring.

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Sub-Program 3.2.2: International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships

Sub-program Description

This program leads the development and implementation of bilateral and international agreements to address air pollutants and global greenhouse gas emissions, and coordinates Canada’s policy, negotiating positions and participation in relevant international fora. The program represents Canada at the North American Leaders’ Summit; leads and participates in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process and complementary international processes to negotiate a comprehensive, binding international climate change agreement; and advances Canada’s negotiating positions and objectives in international fora, such as: the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to reduce Short Lived Climate Pollutants, the Arctic Council, Global Methane Initiative and Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves. The program meets international obligations by contributing to organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Inter American Institute for Global Change. The program also works with the U.S. under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement (AQA), to undertake regional and international efforts to manage transboundary air pollution. The program also works to implement the U.S.–Canada Clean Energy Dialogue, to support bilateral collaboration on clean energy priorities, as well as with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to address common issues related to climate change and air quality. It also participates in the ongoing negotiations and implementation of the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. Using the National Pollutant Release Inventory, the program prepares and submits the Air Pollutant Emission Inventory to meet domestic needs and international reporting requirements. As well, it coordinates Canada’s participation under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer and its Multilateral Fund, with a view to ensuring the gradual elimination of ozone-depleting substances at a global level. Participation under the Montreal Protocol includes promoting a North American proposal to phase-down consumption and production of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), in a manner complementary to provisions on HFCs under the UNFCCC. Participation in the Multilateral Fund includes ensuring payment of Canada’s assessed contribution to the Fund and of the costs of hosting its Secretariat in Montréal (paid through the grants for implementation of the Montreal Protocol). The program supports, in cooperation with other departments and in alignment with international programs, domestic priorities regarding climate change.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
16,817,48916,801,19210,987,504

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
42418

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.2.2: International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
International negotiations and agreements on air pollutants and greenhouse gases are proceeding in a direction consistent with Canadian priorities and interestsPercentage of stated objectives to be achieved in international negotiations and/or agreements which were met or mostly met70% for each category (negotiations and agreements)March 2015

Icon for Theme I (a)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Lead Canada’s efforts under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, including negotiations toward a global climate change agreement, and fulfilling Canada’s obligations under the Convention.
  • Work with international partners to reduce short-lived climate pollutants under the Arctic Council, the Gothenburg Protocol to the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP), the Global Methane Initiative, the Montreal Protocol, the International Maritime Organization and the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC).
  • As a founding member of the CCAC, Canada will continue to collaborate with its partners to address climate change, air quality and health issues by targeting SLCP’s through initiatives, including those on diesel engines, solid waste, and oil and gas operations.
  • Continue collaboration in multilateral fora and international organizations, such as the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, the United Nations Environment Programme, as well as supporting Canadian contributions on climate change to the G-8, the G-20 and the World Meteorological Organization.
  • Continue to engage in bilateral partnerships on climate change and clean air with key partners, including China and Mexico, and the United States (United-States–Canada Clean Energy Dialogue).
  • Continue to collaborate with the United States to reduce transboundary air pollution through the 1991 Canada–United-States Air Quality Agreement, and complete the update to the 2004 Canada–U.S. Transboundary Particulate Matter Science Assessment.
  • Continue to collaborate with international partners under the LRTAP convention to address transboundary air pollution on a regional basis, in Europe, Canada and the United States.
  • Prepare for the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory (April 2015) by ensuring that key information is included.

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Sub-Program 3.2.3: Environmental Technology

Sub-program Description

This program delivers expert environmental science and technology analysis and assessment, and program management to support the Government of Canada’s clean air and greenhouse gas (GHG) technology investment decisions, policy-making and regulations.It oversees the operations of Sustainable Development Technology Canada with Natural Resources Canada and a range of other science and technology programs related to clean technology. It provides expert analysis and assessment to advance clean technologies to help ensure that government priorities regarding clean air, climate change mitigation and green infrastructure are addressed.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
121,800,2037,924,0967,958,562

Note: the decrease in planned spending for 2014-15 as compared to planned spending for 2015-16 is primarily attributable to reductions in funding for the SDTC foundation.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
484746

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Environmental Technology
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be achieved
Reduced emissions from the implementation of new environmental technologiesAnnual reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide equivalents) resulting from environmental technologies supported7.1 MT2015
Reduced emissions from the implementation of new environmental technologiesAnnual reduction of emissions of air pollutants (criteria air contaminants) resulting from environmental technologies supported0.0221 MT2025

Icon for Theme I (a)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, through the Environmental Technology Sub-Program, the Department will:

  • Participate in key federal technology programs (Sustainable Development Technology Canada, and Green Municipal Fund) to maximize environmental benefits and align intended outcomes with departmental priorities (see Science and Technology).
  • Lead the process to develop an international standard (under the International Organization for Standardization) for the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. This standard will harmonize the technical specifications of the ETV process around the world, and promote global acceptance and international trade of verified technologies.
  • Analyze and assess the environmental impacts of new and emerging technologies (e.g., shale gas reservoir stimulation, bioenergy, geoengineering, and pipelines). 

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Program 3.3: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution

Program Description

This program contributes to minimizing damage and threats to the natural environment and biodiversity through the promotion and enforcement of legislation administered by Environment Canada. Activities focus on pollution including toxic substances, their release to air, water or land, and the import and export of hazardous waste that presents a risk to the environment and/or human health. The program maintains a contingent of compliance promotion and enforcement officers. Compliance promotion officers deliver activities to increase regulatees’ awareness, understanding and compliance with regulations and other risk management instruments under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, and the Fisheries Act. The goal is to increase the effectiveness in achieving desired environmental results. The officers also provide information on risk management instrument requirements, the benefits of compliance and the potential penalties of non-compliance, when applicable. Enforcement officers gather intelligence, conduct inspections to verify compliance with laws and regulations, and pursue investigations to take appropriate enforcement measures against offenders. The program works with the U.S. and Mexico through the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation to strengthen transboundary environmental enforcement. The program also includes officer training, information management systems for new regulations and administration, and is informed by scientific analyses and expertise, including science advice to support compliance promotion and enforcement actions.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
38,324,64238,324,64237,797,19429,424,579

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
296292234

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Performance Measurement

Program 3.3: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetDate to be achieved
Compliance with pollution laws and regulations administered by Environment CanadaCompliance with regulatory requirements for selected regulations10% increase in compliance relative to the baseline

Dry Cleaning Regulations:
2015–16 (baseline year 2012–13)

Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations:
2016–17 (baseline year 2013–14)

Metal Mining Effluent Regulations
2017–18 (baseline year 2014–15)

Icon for Theme I (a)Icon for Theme III (n)Planning Highlights
(See also Program 1.4 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife.)

In 2014–15, through the Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution Program, the Department will: 

  • Continue to conduct and report on compliance promotion activities on regulatory requirements pertaining to Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and environmental provisions of the Fisheries Act, with an emphasis on small and medium-sized enterprises and First Nations.  
  • Continue to establish baseline compliance rates to help inform compliance promotion and enforcement activities and enable the Department to tailor strategies to address known compliance issues and trends and inform the public.
  • Make ongoing improvements to the Department’s Web presence to better promote compliance of regulatory requirements, to create clearfix, consistent and easily searchable information about environmental requirements.
  • Continue to partner and collaborate on policy development with other federal departments to enhance enforcement capabilities in the North.
  • Deploy the first phase of a new enforcement information system and the centralization of data to support the Department’s compliance promotion and enforcement activities.
  • Identify enforcement priority areas in consultation with experts and partners, as well as through consideration of data collected through inspections, investigations and intelligence. The Department will also address operational issues requiring attention to ensure fair and predictable law enforcement across the country.
  • Continue to develop an administrative monetary penalties system provided for under the Environmental Violations Administrative Monetary Penalties Act, through which the federal government delivers on its commitment to bolster protection of water, air, land, and wildlife through more effective enforcement.

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Internal Services

Internal Services Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources ($ Dollars)
2014−15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
181,427,802181,427,802177,365,530165,332,951

Note: Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (FTE)*

2014–152015–162016–17
1,4721,4331,342

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Icon for Theme IV (g)Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, Environment Canada’s internal services will undertake initiatives that will enable the Department to contribute to and align with government-wide goals to accelerate systems and processes that support increased efficiency. Specifically, the Department will:

  1. Continue to re-engineer Departmental systems and operations to increase efficiency.
    • Update the Department’s financial system to new software technology (SAP) in keeping with the Government of Canada direction.
    • Advance the Department’s Data Management Program in support of government-wide initiatives for data management, open government and recordkeeping directives.
    • Transform the Department’s email systems and Web infrastructure to align with Government of Canada initiatives.
    • Rationalize the Department’s software applications inventory to reduce redundant or obsolete software.
  2. Improve business processes and common services to maintain or improve levels of service and client satisfaction.
    • Conduct a business transformation exercise related to SAP implementation to continue to standardize, streamline and integrate financial, materiel and asset business processes in support of reducing the cost of government operations.
    • Promote more efficient use of available tools–including improvements to the Department’s online and social media presence–to share information more effectively with Canadians about the Department’s services and accomplishments.
  3. Implement the Departmental People Management Strategy and initiatives to create an adaptive and mobile workforce, and a modern workplace.
    • Implement a change management strategy to support staff through the transition of a number of Central Agency and departmental changes that affect people and business processes, including supporting the Clerk of the Privy Council's Blueprint 2020 vision. 
    • Implement new approaches to performance management and disability management.
    • Progress towards common human resources business processes and a new Human Resources Information Management System (PeopleSoft 9.1).

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Greening Government Operations

Environment Canada is a participant in the 2013–16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and contributes to Theme IV (Greening Government Operations) targets through the Internal Services Program. The Department plans to:

  • Reduce the departmental greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleet by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.
  • Achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.
  • Take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.
  • Develop an approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.
  • Establish SMART targets to reduce the environmental impact of its services to clients.
  • Take further action to improve water management within its real property portfolio.

Additional details on Environment Canada’s activities are available in the Greening Government Operations Supplementary Information Table.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

A “protected” area is a clearfixly defined geographical space, recognized, dedicated and managed, through legal or other effective means, to achieve the long-term conservation of nature with associated ecosystem services and cultural values.

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Footnote 2

The Department’s Protected Area Operational Review was conducted in 2008 and updated in 2011.

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Footnote 3

Environment Canada shares responsibility for this target with Health Canada.

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Footnote 4

Environment Canada shares responsibility for this target with Health Canada.

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Footnote 5

Environment Canada shares responsibility for this target with Public Safety Canada.

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