Skip booklet index and go to page content

2014–2015 Report on Plans and Priorities

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview


Organizational Profile

Minister:

The Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, P.C., M.P

Deputy Head:

Bob Hamilton

Ministerial Portfolio:

Environment Canada

Year established:

1971

Main legislative authorities:

Other:

Environment Canada has a long history. The Department was created in 1971, but some of its component organizations are much older, such as the Canadian Wildlife Service founded in 1947, the Water Survey of Canada in 1908, and the Meteorological Service of Canada in 1871.

Environment Canada has a national workforce. About 60% of the Department’s workforce is located outside the National Capital Region. Department employees are located across Canada, from Iqaluit to Burlington and Vancouver to St. John’s, working in field offices, laboratories, National Wildlife Areas and weather stations.

Environment Canada is a science-based department. Science is central to Environment Canada’s capacity to achieve its mandate and meet its legislative obligations. The Department conducts a wide range of environmental monitoring, research and other scientific activities in fields such as atmospheric sciences, meteorology, physics, biology, chemistry, toxicology, hydrology, ecology, engineering, and informatics. The information and knowledge is used to inform departmental programs, policies and services, and includes the collection and dissemination of knowledge to support sound environmental decision-making and encouragement of innovation. In 2014–15, Environment Canada will launch a new Science Strategy that will tell the Department’s science story and provide the direction and guidance needed to help ensure its science continues to be directed toward national environmental priorities over the coming years.

Environment Canada works collaboratively with many partners. Environmental issues have wide‑ranging implications for social and economic decisions. Environment Canada works in collaboration with many partners, including other federal government departments, provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal governments and organizations, the governments of other nations, academic institutions, environmental non-governmental organizations, andinternational organizations. This collaboration enhances the efforts of all partners in working for a clean, safe and sustainable environment and to achieve planned environmental results.

Environment Canada is committed to operating as a world-class regulator. As an important federal regulator, Environment Canada works within the broader federal performance-based regulatory system developing, promoting compliance with, and enforcing a wide array of regulations to protect Canadians and their environment. The Department is committed to having a regulatory system that is evidence‑based, effective, efficient, transparent and adaptable.

Top of Section


Organizational Context

Raison d’être

Environment Canada is the lead federal department for a wide range of environmental issues affecting Canadians. The Department also plays a stewardship role in achieving and maintaining a clean, safe and sustainable environment. Environment Canada addresses issues through monitoring, research, policy development, service delivery to Canadians, regulations, enforcement of environmental laws, advancement of clean technologies and strategic partnerships. The Department’s programs focus on a clean environment by minimizing threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution; a safe environment by equipping Canadians to make informed decisions on weather, water and climate conditions; and a sustainable environment by conserving and restoring Canada’s natural environment. The Department’s program focus reflects the increasingly evident interdependence between environmental sustainability and economic well-being.

Top of Section


Responsibilities

A number of acts and regulations provide the Department with its mandate and allow it to carry out its programs. Under the Department of the Environment Act, the powers, duties and functions of the Minister of the Environment extend to matters such as:

  • the preservation and enhancement of the quality of the natural environment, including water, air and soil quality, and the coordination of the relevant policies and programs of the Government of Canada;
  • renewable resources, including migratory birds and other non-domestic flora and fauna;
  • meteorology; and
  • the enforcement of rules and regulations.

Beyond those authorities conferred under the Department of the Environment Act, the Minister of the Environment exercises additional authorities provided under other acts and regulations including (but not limited to) the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Federal Sustainable Development Act, and several pieces of legislation relating to the protection of biodiversity and water and the enforcement of environmental laws and regulations (e.g., the Species at Risk Act).

The Department is a key partner to other federal departments (including the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and Parks Canada, which are its ministerial portfolio partners) where statutes provide Environment Canada with secondary or shared responsibility for the successful execution of other federal departments’ mandates. For example, under CEPA 1999, Environment Canada provides information and analysis to others (as a federal authority) to support robust environmental assessments. Other statutes include the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act (Transport Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Natural Resources Canada), the Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology Act (Natural Resources Canada), and the Fisheries Act (Fisheries and Oceans Canada).

Top of Section


Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

Environment Canada fulfills its mandate by promoting three Strategic Outcomes, each contributing to the Government of Canada Outcome of a clean, safe and sustainable environment. There are 9 Programs and 26 Sub-programs that are aligned to support the achievement of the Department’s three Strategic Outcomes. Together, the Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Sub-programs support progress against the Department’s stewardship mandate of providing a clean, safe and sustainable environment. The Department’s Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Sub-programs as well as its Internal Services for 2014–15 are shown below.

  • 1. Strategic Outcome: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations
    • 1.1 Program: Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat
      • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: Biodiversity Policy and Priorities
      • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Species at Risk
        • 1.1.2.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Species at Risk Operations
        • 1.1.2.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk
        • 1.1.2.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Habitat Stewardship Program
      • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: Migratory Birds
      • 1.1.4 Sub-Program: Wildlife Habitat Conservation
        • 1.1.4.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Habitat Conservation Partnerships
        • 1.1.4.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Protected Areas
    • 1.2 Program: Water Resources
      • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health
      • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Water Resource Management and Use
      • 1.2.3 Sub-Program: Hydrological Service and Water Survey
    • 1.3 Program: Sustainable Ecosystems
      • 1.3.1 Sub-Program: Sustainability Reporting and Indicators
      • 1.3.2 Sub-Program: Ecosystem Assessment and Approaches
      • 1.3.3 Sub-Program: Community Engagement
        • 1.3.3.1 Sub-Sub-Program: EcoAction Community Funding
        • 1.3.3.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Environmental Damages Fund
        • 1.3.3.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Environmental Youth Employment
      • 1.3.4 Sub-Program: Ecosystems Initiatives
        • 1.3.4.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Great Lakes
        • 1.3.4.2 Sub-Sub-Program: St. Lawrence
        • 1.3.4.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Lake Simcoe/South-Eastern Georgian Bay
        • 1.3.4.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Lake Winnipeg
        • 1.3.4.5 Sub-Sub-Program: Community Engagement Partnerships
    • 1.4 Program: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife
  • 2. Strategic Outcome: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions
    • 2.1 Program: Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians
      • 2.1.1 Sub-Program: Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings
      • 2.1.2 Sub-Program: Health-related Meteorological Information
      • 2.1.3 Sub-Program: Climate Information, Predictions and Tools
    • 2.2 Program: Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users
      • 2.2.1 Sub-Program: Meteorological Services in Support of Air Navigation
      • 2.2.2 Sub-Program: Meteorological and Ice Services in Support of Marine Navigation
      • 2.2.3 Sub-Program: Meteorological Services in Support of Military Operations
      • 2.2.4 Sub-Program: Meteorological Services for Economic and Commercial Sectors
  • 3. Strategic Outcome: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.
    • 3.1 Program: Substances and Waste Management
      • 3.1.1 Sub-Program: Substances Management
      • 3.1.2 Sub-Program: Effluent Management
      • 3.1.3 Sub-Program: Marine Pollution
      • 3.1.4 Sub-Program: Environmental Emergencies
      • 3.1.5 Sub-Program: Contaminated Sites
    • 3.2 Program: Climate Change and Clean Air
      • 3.2.1 Sub-Program:  Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program
        • 3.2.1.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Industrial Sector Emissions
        • 3.2.1.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Transportation Sector Emissions
        • 3.2.1.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Consumer and Commercial Products Sector
      • 3.2.2 Sub-Program: International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships
      • 3.2.3 Sub-Program: Environmental Technology
        • 3.2.3.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Sustainable Development Technologies
        • 3.2.3.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Environmental Technology Innovation
    • 3.3 Program: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution
  • Internal Services

Top of Section


Organizational Priorities

Environment Canada maintains four priorities for 2014–15. These priorities reflect the Department’s stewardship mandate that, in turn, directly supports the Government of Canada’s outcome of a clean and healthy environment. The Department will pursue a number of plans to deliver these priorities, as set out in the following tables.

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)

Priority 1: A Clean Environment

Manage substances and waste, and reduce pollution that directly or indirectly harms human health or the environment.

Ongoing

Links to:

Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Programs: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3

Description

Why this is a priority:

Harmful substances released into the environment and products that contain toxic substances threaten the health of Canadians and their environment. The application of sound science and clean technologies, as well as a strong regulatory framework, are vital to addressing these threats effectively. Domestic and international activities that affect the environment in Canada call for focused collaboration to make meaningful and lasting progress on achieving a clean environment.

Plans for meeting the “Clean Environment” priority:

  • Deliver on the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP);
  • Deliver on the Government’s sector-by-sector regulatory approach to reducing Canada’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions;
  • Deliver on federal components of the national Air Quality Management System;
  • Advance Canada’s environmental goals related to climate change and clean air through participation in international fora; and,
  • Promote compliance with and enforce pollution regulations.

 

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)

Priority 2: A Safe Environment

Provide Canadians with high-quality information on immediate and long-term environmental conditions.

Ongoing

Links to:

Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

Programs: 2.1, 2.2

Description

Why this is a priority:

Canadians rely on Environment Canada’s weather and environmental services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. This information, including current weather forecasts and warnings and air quality information, helps Canadians make safe decisions in response to changing weather, water and climate conditions. Targeted users (for example, energy and resource development sectors) rely on information specific to their safety and/or economic needs in order to reduce their vulnerability to climate change and variability. Current and reliable science-based information supports users in taking precautions and/or avoiding hazardous areas in order to prevent or limit danger and damage. Ongoing research and development enable Environment Canada to increase the timeliness and accuracy of its weather and environmental prediction.

Plans for meeting the “Safe Environment” priority:

  • Deliver high-quality weather and environmental services to Canadians through an improved ability to detect severe weather and the modernization of the monitoring infrastructure; and,
  • Leverage the foundational weather and environmental services as well as collaborative partnerships to deliver services to targeted users which support their decision-making around their business operations.

 

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)

Priority 3: A Sustainable Environment

Work to sustain land, water and biodiversity.

Ongoing

Links to:

Strategic Outcome 1:   Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

Programs: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4

Description

Why this is a priority:

Canada’s natural environment provides significant benefits to Canadians. Sustaining these benefits depends on maintaining the diversity of species and sustainable ecosystems. Environment Canada’s monitoring plays an important role in helping to sustain these resources; this work is dependent on the Department’s robust science base, as well as on its promotion of compliance and enforcement through a strong regulatory foundation.

Plans for meeting the “Sustainable Environment” priority:

  • Improve and advance implementation of the Species at Risk program including by reducing the number of overdue recovery documents;
  • Pursue a collaborative approach to protect and conserve biodiversity at home and abroad, including by supporting the development of a National Conservation Plan and the maintenance and expansion of a network of protected areas;
  • Contribute to responsible resource development through the provision of science-based expert advice during environmental assessments;
  • Advance work through the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring;
  • Implement a comprehensive approach to protecting water and to ecosystem management;
  • Continue collaborative work with the provinces and territories on water quantity monitoring through the National Hydrometric Program; and,
  • Promote compliance with and enforce wildlife acts and regulations.

 

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)

Priority 4: Management Priority

Transform the Department’s internal services operations to enhance service delivery.

OngoingLinks to all Strategic Outcomes and Programs
Description

Why this is a priority:

The Department has been working to ensure that internal services such as human and financial resources, information management and information technology, and communications, are aligned to provide the best support services and to enable achievement of results. The Department is also continuing to support government-wide initiatives.

Plans for meeting the Management priority:

  • Continue to re-engineer departmental systems and operations to increase efficiency;
  • Improve business processes and common services to maintain or improve levels of service and client satisfaction; and,
  • Implement the Departmental People Management Strategy and initiatives to create an adaptive and mobile workforce and a modern workplace.

Top of Section


Risk Analysis

Environment Canada proactively manages potential risks that it may face. Through ongoing monitoring, decisions and adjustments are made to departmental strategies, resources or program objectives to support mitigation measures, should these risks materialize. Within the current operating environment, the Department has identified the following key risks for 2014–15:

Key Risks
RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program Alignment Architecture

Delivering Environment Canada Services

There is a risk that the Department’s provision of key services and other information for Canadians, partners and others, may be impeded as a consequence of the Department’s reliance on the performance of essential infrastructure and systems.

The Department will utilize established channels, protocols, and agreements within the Department and with its key stakeholders to ensure that risks of not being able to deliver its services are managed; the viability and readiness of business continuity plans will continue to be tested, both nationally and regionally; training will be provided for stakeholders and staff responsible for responding to emergencies.Strategic Outcomes
2 and 3

Working with Partners/Stakeholders

There is a risk that differing priorities or capacity limitations of partners and stakeholders may impact the Department’s ability to efficiently deliver programs and services, or advance key environmental initiatives.

In line with the Department’s Blueprint 2020 engagement strategy, short term and longer term actions to be considered include building and strengthening relations with citizens, stakeholders and partners. For instance, through collaborative planning networks/ processes to facilitate better sharing of information, understanding of strategic priorities and potential changes, clarity of roles and responsibilities, and more timely mitigating actions as required.  Strategic Outcomes
1, 2, and 3

Workforce Readiness

As the federal public service evolves and competition for specialized/ science expertise within private sectors and industry increases, there is a risk that it may become increasingly difficult for the Department to attract, develop, retain and motivate a high-performing and innovative workforce in certain areas.

In line with the Department’s Blueprint 2020 engagement strategy, short term and longer term actions to be considered include building a capable workforce. Key factors for consideration include employee well-being, employee training, ensuring managers are properly equipped to perform their managerial role, and promoting a culture of performance management. The Department will also examine with other Science-based departments, options for updating resourcing models for scientists (classifying, recruiting, deploying, compensating).Strategic Outcomes
1, 2 and 3

Managing Information

As government drives towards whole of government information management including greater efficiencies and protection of government information, there is a risk that the Department may be challenged to protect and preserve information given the potential of cyber threats and the ever increasing pace of change related to the collection and storage of information.

The implementation of protocols and procedures, ongoing communication and provision of relevant training relating to information management, security, file management, privacy, quality assurance and compliance testing, are among the mitigation activities that the Department will continue to undertake or advance.Strategic Outcomes
1, 2 and 3  plus Internal Services

Regulatory/Legislation

There is a risk that the Department may be perceived as not generating timely regulations or legislation to respond to emerging priorities for environmental action.

To mitigate this risk the Department is making concerted efforts to maintain and strengthen its relationships with key partners and stakeholders domestically, internationally and continentally through participating in key partnerships and fora and engaging in ongoing communication and strategic dialogues with partners and stakeholders to share, and understand regulatory and/or legislative expectations.Strategic Outcomes
1 and 3
Risk Narrative

With the mandate to support a clean, safe and sustainable environment for Canadians, Environment Canada works in partnership with others to achieve its mandate through a variety of activities. Environment Canada fulfills its mandate through key operational activities including monitoring, research, policy development, service delivery to Canadians, development of regulations, enforcement of environmental laws and strategic partnerships.

As is the case for all organizations, Environment Canada faces uncertainties in meeting its objectives. These uncertainties create opportunities and risks with potential to positively or negatively affect program results and outcomes. Uncertainties include those driven by external environmental factors, such as dependencies on partners and stakeholders, changing regulatory and legislative requirements, increasing Canadian and international expectations concerning the management of the environment and the continuously increasing pace of advances in science and technology.

Risk management practices are integrated at the corporate, operational, and program/project levels within the Department. To support effective opportunity and risk management, Environment Canada has developed the Integrated Risk Management Framework and tools that formalize risk management roles and responsibilities, assign accountabilities and allow for consistent monitoring and continuous improvement. The Department’s Corporate Risk Profile provides a corporate view of key risks with a focus on external risks, their likelihood and their potential impacts.

Top of Section


Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending – $ Dollars)*
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
932,167,3301,011,506,073861,462,657698,817,787

*All figures are net of respendable revenues.

The Department’s planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the departmental Strategic Outcomes and Programs. The variance in planned spending for 2014–15 as compared to the Main Estimates 2014–15 is due to the inclusion of a planned statutory payment to the Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) Foundation. The 2015–16 decrease is explained by the reduction in funding for the SDTC Foundation and the sunsetting of temporary funds. In 2016–17, the decrease in funding is explained by the sunsetting of funding for temporary initiatives. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents–FTEs)*
2014–152015–162016–17
6,4006,1915,348

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures. The FTE numbers include students throughout the document.

One FTE equals one person working full-time on a 37.5-hour work week for the year, or any number of part-time employees whose combined hours of work equal one FTE. The number of FTEs for a year is calculated using the total planned spending for salaries in the 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17 fiscal years divided by the departmental average salary. As a result, Environment Canada plans to use 6,400 FTEs in 2014–15, with planned decreases of FTE utilization in 2015–16 and 2016–17.

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome 1 and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations
Strategic Outcome and Programs2011-12 Expenditures2012-13 Expenditures2013-14 Forecast Spending2014-15 Main Estimates2014-15 Planned Spending2015-16 Planned Spending2016-17 Planned Spending
Program 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat138,780,378124,279,701119,500,86891,592,39491,592,39477,524,13077,247,467
Program 1.2 Water Resources107,643,683108,552,18196,564,82791,196,85791,196,85788,228,01388,013,012
Program 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems66,180,59467,500,28268,134,63192,013,64292,013,64282,871,75562,603,076
Program 1.4 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement17,467,43016,695,29216,725,03515,821,92615,821,92615,321,59315,356,059
Strategic Outcome 1 Subtotal330,072,085317,027,456300,925,361290,624,819290,624,818263,945,491243,219,614

The variance between forecast spending for 2013–14 and planned spending for 2014–15 is mainly due to the increase in funding for the Action Plan on Clean Water initiative ($10.7M) offset by the grant payment in 2013–14 to the Nature Conservancy of Canada ($20.0M). With regard to the decrease from 2014–15 to 2015–16, the variance is primarily due to the sunsetting of additional funds that were provided in Budget 2012. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents. The decrease between planned spending for 2015–16 and 2016–17 is mainly attributable to reduced funding for the Action Plan on Clean Water initiative.

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome 2 and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions
Strategic Outcome and Programs2011-12 Expenditures2012-13 Expenditures2013-14 Forecast Spending2014-15 Main Estimates2014-15 Planned Spending2015-16 Planned Spending2016-17 Planned Spending
Program 2.1 Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians172,435,665167,695,081153,040,477165,962,548165,962,548170,289,173143,157,785
Program 2.2 Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users24,057,56123,048,76026,528,58125,266,28025,266,28020,608,91218,816,401
Strategic Outcome 2 Subtotal196,493,226190,743,841179,569,058191,228,828191,228,828190,898,085161,974,186

The variance between forecast spending for 2013–14 and planned spending for 2014–15 is mainly due to the realignment between programs for the transfer of funds and responsibilities to Shared Services Canada. Variances for 2016–17 are mainly due to sunsetting of temporarily funded programsSunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome 3 and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.
Strategic Outcome and Programs2011-12 Expenditures2012-13 Expenditures2013-14 Forecast Spending2014-15 Main Estimates2014-15 Planned Spending2015-16 Planned Spending2016-17 Planned Spending
Program 3.1 Substances and Waste Management83,291,32279,295,78176,209,84175,747,78975,747,78973,834,43244,042,633
Program 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air118,255,660157,525,949179,156,825154,813,450234,152,193117,621,92554,823,824
Program 3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution43,266,98141,707,20643,977,88438,324,64238,324,64237,797,19429,424,579
Strategic Outcome 3 Subtotal244,813,963278,528,936299,344,550268,885,881348,224,624229,253,551128,291,036

The variance between forecast spending for 2013–14 and the 2014–15 planned spending is mainly due to the increase in funding requirements for the SDTC Foundation offset by other savings measures. Variances for 2016–17 are mainly due to sunsetting of temporarily funded programs. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Budgetary Planning Summary for Internal Services Program (dollars)

Internal Services
Internal Services2011-12 Expenditures2012-13 Expenditures2013-14 Forecast Spending2014-15 Main Estimates2014-15 Planned Spending2015-16 Planned Spending2016-17 Planned Spending
Subtotal237,096,982203,355,229198,262,350181,427,802181,427,802177,365,530165,332,951

The variance between forecast spending 2013–14 and planned spending for 2014–15 is mainly due to other savings measures. Variances for 2016–17 are mainly due to reductions of sunsetting programs. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce, or enhance funding. Outcomes of such decisions would be reflected in the Department’s future Budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Budgetary Planning Summary for All Programs (dollars)

 2011-12 Expenditures2012-13 Expenditures2013-14 Forecast Spending2014-15 Main Estimates2014-15 Planned Spending2015-16 Planned Spending2016-17 Planned Spending
Total – All programs1,008,476,256989,655,462978,101,319932,167,3301,011,506,073861,462,657698,817,787

Top of Section


Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

2014–15 Budgetary Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government Spending Areas ($ Dollars)

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations
ProgramSpending AreaGovernment of Canada Outcome2014–15 Planned Spending
Program 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and HabitatEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment91,592,394
Program 1.2 Water ResourcesEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment91,196,857
Program 1.3 Sustainable EcosystemsEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment92,013,642
Program 1.4 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – WildlifeEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment15,821,926
Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions
ProgramSpending AreaGovernment of Canada Outcome2014–15 Planned Spending
Program 2.1 Weather and Environmental Services for CanadiansEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment165,962,548
Program 2.2 Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted UsersEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment25,266,280
Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized
ProgramSpending AreaGovernment of Canada Outcome2014–15 Planned Spending
Program 3.1 Substances and Waste ManagementEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment75,747,789
Program 3.2 Climate Change and Clean AirEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment234,152,193
Program 3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – PollutionEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment38,324,642
Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending AreaTotal Planned Spending
Economic Affairs830,078,270
Social Affairs0
International Affairs0
Government Affairs0

Top of Section


Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

View text version
Fiscal YearTotal SpendingSunset ProgramsVariance
2011-121,008,476
2012-13989,655(18,821)
2013-14978,101(11,554)
2014-151,011,5063,98133,405
2015-16861,46349,908(150,043)
2016-17698,818192,781(162,645)

Note: These figures are net of respendable revenues. Forecast Spending includes 2013–14 Main Estimates plus 2013-14 Supplementary Estimates B and anticipated Supplementary Estimates C; it does not include the reimbursement of collective agreements and the operating carry-forward.

Top of Section


For the fiscal year 2011–12 and 2012–13, actual spending represents the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts. For the fiscal year 2013–14, the forecast spending represents the planned budgetary and statutory expenditures as presented in the Estimates documents (Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates). For the period 2014–15 to 2016–17, the planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the departmental strategic outcomes.

As indicated in the chart above, Environment Canada’s actual spending for 2012–13 was $989.7 million, a year-over-year decrease of $18.8 million (1.9%) from 2011–12 spending. This decrease is mainly due to reductions attributable to savings measures, a smaller payment to the Nature Conservancy of Canada, and the transfer for a full year of funding and responsibilities to Shared Services Canada. These reductions were offset by increased spending to support fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord.

Between 2012–13 and 2013–14, the graph shows decreases in forecast spending mainly due to:

  • sunsetting in funding for the fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord;
  • internal savings and efficiencies;
  • reduced funding received from Treasury Board with regard to in-year adjustments and transfers; and
  • increase in funding for the SDTC Foundation.

The increase between 2013–14 forecast spending and 2014–15 planned spending is mainly due to:

  • increased planned spending for the SDTC Foundation;
  • increased planned spending for the Action Plan on Clean Water initiative;
  • decreased planned spending for the Nature Conservancy of Canada; and
  • decreased planned spending for the Clean Air Agenda.

For the explanation on variances in planned spending between 2014–15 and 2016–17, please see the analysis included in the Planned Expenditures section.

Top of Section


Estimates by Vote

For information on Environment Canada’s appropriations, please see the 2014–15 Main Estimates publication.

Top of Section


Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy 

The 2013–16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s 2013–16 sustainable development activities. The FSDS articulates Canada’s federal sustainable development priorities for a period of three years, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). 

Environment Canada contributes to Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability, Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians and Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government, as denoted by the visual identifiers below.

Icon for Theme 1   Icon for Theme II   Icon for Theme III   Icon for Theme IV

These contributions are components of eight Programs, 19 Sub-Programs, and the Internal Services Program, and are further explained and identified by the visual identifiers in Section II.

Environment Canada also ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA). A SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

For additional details on Environment Canada’s activities to support sustainable development please see Section II of this RPP and the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy website component. For complete details on the FSDS, please see the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy website.