Article Title
Date

Interactions between Sediment and Water

2011-10-12

Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy image showing general live (green) and dead (red) cells associated with eroded floc (laboratory flume experiment) | © University of Guelph, Mahendran BasuvarajEnvironment Canada’s Dr. Ian G. Droppo concludes that river bed sediment can represent a significant source of pathogenic organisms to the water column. In a co-authored presentation titled "Linking pathogen and sediment dynamics: Implications on policy development for aquatic and human health management," he recommended that sediment-pathogen dynamics be considered when identifying pathogen source areas and assessing aquatic and human health risk since water samples could reflect not only terrestrial sources but also a resuspension of previously settled pathogens (in association with cohesive flocs) from the river bed. The work behind this presentation was completed in collaboration with scientists from McMaster, Guelph, and Ryerson universities, and was presented at the 12th International Symposium on the Interactions between Sediment and Water.  

Dr. Droppo was honoured at the symposium for his contribution to the International Association for Sediment Water Science over the past 15 years. During this time, he served on the Board of Directors as Secretary/Treasurer, Vice President, President, and Past President.

The conference addressed key issues of relevance to the Department’s priorities, including; 1) nutrient and pollutant fluxes in natural and engineered aquatic systems, 2) the role of biota in water-sediment interactions of marine and freshwater environments, 3) new technologies for advancing sediment-water science from micro to catchment scale, 4) adaptation of sediment-water systems to climate change risks, and 5) restoration of disturbed aquatic systems. Abstracts are available online in the Book of Abstracts.

Contact: Ian Droppo, 905-336-4701, Aquatic Ecosystem Management Research

Photo Caption: Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy image showing general live (green) and dead (red) cells associated with eroded floc (laboratory flume experiment) | © University of Guelph, Mahendran Basuvaraj