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Dry Cleaning Regulations

This section provides information on the  Tetrachloroethylene (Use in Dry Cleaning and Reporting Requirements) Regulations developed under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999). Tetrachloroethylene, also known as perchloroethylene (PERC or PCE), is referred to as PERC on this website and related documents.   

About PERC

PERC was included in the list of 44 substances that was published as the first Priority Substances list (PSL1) in the Canada Gazette Part I on February 11, 1989. PSL1 identifies substances to be assessed on a priority basis to determine whether they are toxic and pose a risk to the health of Canadians or to the environment.

The atmospheric concentrations of PERC may be sufficient to cause adverse effects on some terrestrial plants, notably trees. Contamination of groundwater and groundwater-recharged surface water in some parts of Canada could also be of concern, particularly in areas where there has been inappropriate disposal and release of PERC from dry cleaning facilities or landfills.

About the  PERC Regulations 

Based on the PSL1, stakeholder consultations were held to determine risk management options for the substances listed as toxic. The Strategic Options Report on the stakeholder consultations, was published in February 1996 and was the basis for the PERC regulations.

The purpose of the PERC regulations is to reduce releases of PERC from dry cleaning facilities into the environment.

Reductions in PERC releases will be attained by:

  • requiring newer, more efficient dry cleaning machines
  • minimizing spills of PERC
  • managing the collection and disposal of residues and waste water

Compliance Promotion information is available for:

 

Updated: March 2013