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ARCHIVED - Guidance Manual for the Risk Evaluation Framework for Sections 199 and 200 of CEPA 1999 : Decisions on Environmental Emergency Plans

Lists of Tables and Figures

List of Tables

List of Figures

Figure 1: Pre-screening Assessment

This figure is a flow chart, detailing the pre-screening assessment of the REF process (Risk Evaluation Framework). The first step of the assessment is to determine whether a chemical will actually qualify for the REF process. Two primary questions are posed: is the chemical in commerce in Canada, or is it regulated by another act? If the answer is yes to either of these questions, then no action will be taken. If it is no, then the chemical is assessed for an emergencies pathway and then categorized into one of 3 subsections, Environmental Hazards, Human Health Hazards, or Physical Damage.

Figure 2: Environmental Hazards Subsection

Figure 2 is a flow chart, which displays a simplified version of the steps taken when a chemical is placed into the Environmental Hazards Subsection. This substance will undergo several tests in order to determine whether an E2 plan is required. If Persistence (air, water, and soil), or Bioaccumulation are at a "moderate" level then an E2 plan is required. For Aquatic toxicity, Terrestrial toxicity, and Ingestion toxicity, an E2 plan is triggered if their effects are considered "very high". When the scores of these sections are summed up, and they are greater than 0.55, an E2 plan is automatically required. If the sum of their scores in between 0.45 and 0.55 then more data is required, and if the score is less than 0.45 an E2 plan is not required.

Figure 3: Human Health Hazards Subsection

Similar to the two previous figures, figure 3 is also presented in a flow chart format. When a chemical is placed into this Human Health Hazards subsection, it will be subject to certain analysis pertaining to human health. First, Vapour Pressure is taken. If it is greater than or equal to 1.333 kPa then the substance is tested for Inhalation, Dermal, and Ingestion Toxicity. If Vapour Pressure is less than 1.333 kPa then Inhalation toxicity is not included, and analysis begins with dermal toxicity. If any of the toxicity levels are "very high", an E2 plan is obligatory. An E2 plan will also be requested if the substance is a known carcinogen or is corrosive and irritating to the skin. At the end of the analysis, the sections within this Environmental Hazards subsection are summed up. If they have a score of greater than 0.55 then an E2 plan is automatically required. If the sum of their scores is between 0.45 and 0.55 than more data is required, and if the score is less than 0.45 an E2 plan is not required.

Figure 4: Physical Safety Subsection

When a substance is being analyzed under the Physical Safety Subsection, it will be tested for flammability, and instability. If it is found that the affects of these properties are "very high" then an E2 plan is assigned. The scoring for substances in this Subsection are identical to that of Environment Hazards, and Human Health Hazards sections. The sum of the scores must be greater than 0.55 to automatically require an E2 plan. If it is between 0.45 and 0.55 more data is required, and if the score is less than 0.45 an E2 plan is not required.

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