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Guide for Reporting to the National Pollutant Release Inventory 2001

Step 4 - Enter or update the facility information

Steps 4 and 5 describe the information required and the procedures to follow to comply with the Canada Gazette notice for the 2001 NPRI. The electronic reporting form was developed to facilitate data input for reporters, to provide help files for the person completing the report and to reduce errors in data transcription. For ease of reference, Steps 4 and 5 follow the same order, titles and numbering system as the electronic reporting form.

If your facility is located in Ontario and you are required to report to the NPRI and the MOE, the software will display both the NPRI and MOE fields. Refer to the Guide for Reporting under O.Reg.127/01 Using the NPRI/MOE Software - 2001 or Help file for a description of the MOE fields.

Facility Identification

From the "Main Menu" of the NPRI software, select the "View / Enter / Edit Data"menu and then select "Reporting Facilities". The electronic reporting form allows NPRI reports for more than one facility to be created. This is useful for company coordinators who are submitting NPRI reports for several facilities. You can add, delete or edit a facility record from the facility list.

At any time while completing the report, you can save the information you have entered or abandon the changes you have made. Save your work often to avoid losing data if the hardware or software fail.

A1. NPRI ID, Web Site Address, Dun and Bradstreet Number

The "Reporting Year" field cannot be changed. This is the calendar year for which you are required to report to the NPRI and for which you will be providing information.

A1.1 NPRI ID

If an NPRI report was previously submitted for your facility, it was assigned a permanent NPRI identification number. The NPRI ID is specific to the facility and does not change even if ownership of the facility has changed. You will find this number on the mailing label of the 2001 NPRI package or on correspondence sent to your company/facility. If you cannot find your NPRI ID number, call your regional NPRI office (listed inside the front cover).

If this is your first year of reporting, place the cursor in the NPRI ID field marked "NEW REPORT". Generate a temporary identification number by clicking on the "Generate a temporary NPRI ID" button. A permanent NPRI ID for your facility will be assigned by Environment Canada at a later date.

A1.2 Language

Correspondence from Environment Canada will be in the language identified, i.e., English or French. The language code determines which language is used by the software when printing reports.

A1.4 Web Site Address

This is an optional field for you to provide the Web site address of your facility or parent company. The address you provide will become part of the on-line NPRI database and will allow visitors to link directly to your Web site for more information.

A1.5 Dun and Bradstreet (D-U-N-S) Number

D-U-N-S is a nine-digit number that Dun and Bradstreet uses to identify companies in its financial database. This will allow the NPRI to identify the corporate structures relating facilities to their parent companies. A large organization is likely to have many D-U-N-S numbers, linking their various headquarters, subsidiaries, branches and facilities. Report the D-U-N-S number of the facility. This number may be available from your facility's treasurer or financial officer. If the facility doesn't have a D-U-N-S number, but the parent company does, report that number in field A3 "Identification of Parent Companies". If you need to verify your D-U-N-S number or obtain a new one, call the Dun and Bradstreet Customer Service Centre at 1-800-463-6362, or (416) 463-6362; Fax: (905) 568-5815. For more information, you can visit the Dun and Bradstreet Web site at <www.dnb.com>.

A2. Facility Identification and Site Address

The NPRI database fully supports uppercase/lowercase text entry which improves legibility. DATA ENTRY IN ALL UPPERCASE CHARACTERS IS DISCOURAGED. Please take the time to correctly enter your facility identification as you wish it to appear in the publicly-accessible database. This information will be used to identify your facility in all Environment Canada reports and data products and should therefore be selected carefully to ensure that your facility is correctly identified.

Geographic coordinates for facilities are determined by Environment Canada. Facilities may be asked to provide the information needed to determine the geographic coordinates of the facility.

A2.1 Company Name

Enter your company name. This field is mandatory. If your company owns more than one reporting facility, please ensure that the company name is used consistently for all facilities.

A2.2 Facility Name

Enter the name of the facility or any other information which, in addition to the "Company Name", completely identifies the facility. You may omit the "Facility Name" if the "Company Name" alone completely identifies the facility.

Company NameFacility Name
Specialty PharmaceuticalsLiquids Plant
Trans Canada AirlinesCalgary
Canadian RefineriesAlberta Processing Plant
International ManufacturingABC Manufacturing Division

A2.3 and A2.4 Street Address

The "Street Address" is the site address of the facility. Do not use a post office box or mailing address as the street address. A mailing address can be given when identifying a public contact, technical contact or company coordinator. Enter the street name and number and other identifiers such as suite number or building designation. For rural addresses, where a street address is not available, enter the lot and concession numbers, and the township or its equivalent.

A2.5 City/District

Enter the name of the city, town, village, district or township in which the facility is located.

A2.6 Province or Territory

Enter the name of the province or territory in which the facility is located. Choose the name or abbreviation from the pick-list that is available while the cursor is in the "Province" field.

A2.7 Postal Code

Enter the postal code. It will be formatted automatically (e.g., V7M 3H7).

A3. Identification of Parent Companies

For the purposes of the NPRI, a parent company is defined as the highest level company or group of companies that directly control your facility. If your company is not owned or controlled by another parent company, select "No" in field A3.1, "Is the facility controlled by another company or companies?" Otherwise select "Yes" in field A3.1. This opens the "Identification of Parent Companies" screen in which you can report the names, addresses and percent ownership of controlling parent companies. The D-U-N-S number identifies the parent company and its corporate relationship to the reporting facility. Complete this field as described in A1.5. The province, territory or U.S. state codes can be found in pick-lists available while the cursor is in these fields. Field P1.8 "Zip Code or Other" is provided for addresses in the U.S. or in other countries. The "Country" field (P1.10) must be completed only if the address is outside Canada or the U.S.

A4. Facility Public Contact

Enter the name, position title, e-mail address, telephone and facsimile numbers of the facility's public contact. The public contact does not have to be the same person who prepares the report or signs the Statement of Certification and does not necessarily need to be someone at the reporting facility. However, this person should be able to answer questions from the public about the report. A position title alone, such as "Environmental Coordinator", can be used to identify the public contact. The facility public contact will be identified in the NPRI database available to the public. If these fields are left blank, the technical contact (in field A6) will be listed as the public contact in the NPRI database.

A5. Facility Public Contact Address

Complete this field if the mailing address for the public contact is different from the facility's site address (A2). The province, territory or U.S. state names can be found in pick-lists while the cursor is in these fields. Field A5.9 "Zip Code/Other" is provided for addresses in the U.S. or in other countries. The "Country" field (A5.10) must be completed only if the address is outside Canada or the U.S.

A6. Facility Technical Contact

Enter the name, position title, e-mail address, telephone and facsimile numbers of a technical representative who can be contacted by Environment Canada for clarification of the report. This person should be familiar with the details of the report and be able to answer questions about the information provided. The technical contact will be listed as the public contact in the NPRI database if a public contact is not named in field A4. Unless a company coordinator is identified in field A8, the technical contact will receive all information, mailings and inquiries from Environment Canada. A consultant can be the technical contact as long as a company coordinator is identified in field A8.

A7. Facility Technical Contact Address

If the mailing address for the technical contact is different from the facility's site address (A2), complete this field as described in A5.

A8. Company Coordinator

In addition to a facility technical contact, some companies may coordinate reports for several facilities through a central contact. If you answer "Yes" to the question "Would you like to have information sent to a central contact?", provide the name, position title, e-mail address, telephone and facsimile numbers for the company coordinator (fields A8.1 to A8.8). Correspondence from Environment Canada will be addressed to the company coordinator. If there is no coordinator, correspondence will be sent to the technical contact. This field will already be completed if you entered this information in field C2 in the opening screens (see Step 3).

A9. Company Coordinator Address

If the mailing address for the company coordinator is different from the facility's site address (A2), complete this field as described in A5.

A10. Primary Industrial Classification Codes

Industrial classifications are a means of identifying different types of businesses and industries. The NPRI has adopted the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS Canada) as the standard for identifying industrial sectors to enable better comparisons of NPRI data with similar inventories in the U.S. and Mexico. This year, the NPRI will also continue to collect Canadian and American Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) data to retain continuity with historical data.

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)

The NAICS was developed by Statistics Canada, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and Mexico's Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografia e Informatica, to enable the respective national agencies to collect comparable statistical data (Statistics Canada, 1998). It has replaced the 1980 SIC as the standard for classifying industries by Statistics Canada. Statistics Canada provides complete details of NAICS Canada on its Web site at www.statcan.ca/english/concepts/industry.htm .

You can order a copy of the NAICS Canada Manual (printed version, Catalogue No. 12-501-XPE; CD-ROM, Catalogue No. 12-501-XCB) on-line, toll free at 1-800-700-1033 (voice) or 1-800-889-9734 (fax), or through Statistics Canada Regional Reference Centres.

The NAICS Canada consists of 20 sectors, 99 subsectors, 321 industry groups, 734 industries and 921 national industries. Industries within these sectors are grouped according to their production processes rather than the goods or services produced. The numbering system that has been adopted is a six-digit code, of which the first five digits are used by the three countries to produce comparable data. The first two digits designate the sector, the third digit designates the subsector, the fourth digit designates the industry group and the fifth digit designates industries. For example, the first two digits "21" designate the utilities sector comprised of industries engaged in operating gas, electrical and water utilities. The four-digit NAICS code "2111" refers to the electric power generation, transmission and distribution industry group.Within this group, "21111" refers specifically to electric power generation while "21112" is electric power transmission, control and distribution. The sixth digit is used to designate national industries. At this level, the respective national agencies are free to define classifications relevant to their own economies. In this example, hydro-electric, fossil-fuel-electric and nuclear-electric power generation have the NAICS Canada codes "211111", "211112", and "211113", respectively.

Sector and subsector NAICS classifications and their corresponding two-, three- and four-digit codes are listed in Appendix 7. The electronic reporting form provides a pick-list of the NAICS codes. If you are unsure about the correct NAICS code for your facility, contact your regional NPRI office.

Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes

SIC codes are numerical identifiers for different types of businesses and industries (Statistics Canada, 1989). The first two digits of a four-digit SIC code define a major business sector, while the last two denote a facility's specialty within that sector. For example, the first two digits (37) of the Canadian SIC code "3751" represent the chemical industry in general, and the last two digits (51) represent the paints and varnishes industry. Code "3741" represents the same major sector but denotes the pharmaceutical industry. Two-digit Canadian and American SIC codes are listed in Appendices 8 and 9, respectively. The electronic reporting form provides a pick-list of two-digit Canadian SIC codes. The software also provides concordance tables of four-digit Canadian SIC codes and their corresponding U.S. SIC codes. If you are unsure about the correct SIC code for your facility, contact your regional NPRI office.

A10.1 Two-digit Canadian SIC Code

Enter the two-digit Canadian SIC code that best represents your facility as found in Appendix 8 or access the pick-list and choose the appropriate number. Your facility may be engaged in several different activities that are described by more than one SIC code. If so, use the SIC code that describes the activity having the greatest value.

A10.2 Four-digit Canadian SIC Code

Based on the two-digit code entered in field A10.1, the software will provide a pick-list of four-digit codes associated with your industrial sector. Select the most appropriate Canadian SIC code for your facility according to the description provided.

A10.3 Four-digit U.S. SIC Code

Based on the Canadian SIC code entered in field A10.2, the software will provide a pick-list of corresponding four-digit U.S. codes. As some Canadian classifications are broader than the U.S. codes, there may be more than one U.S. code for each Canadian code. A common error is to select the first choice offered by the software. Be certain to select the appropriate U.S. SIC code for your facility.

A10.4 Two-digit NAICS Code

Choose the two-digit code or range of codes which best describes the industrial sector in which your facility operates. A pick-list of two-digit codes is available or you may refer to the NAICS codes in Appendix 7. Note that some sectors, such as manufacturing (31-33), span several two-digit codes. Use the pick-list to select the correct range of two-digit NAICS codes.

A10.5 Four-digit NAICS Code

Based on the two-digit NAICS code entered in field A10.4, the software will provide a pick-list of four-digit NAICS codes for the corresponding subsectors. A list of four-digit NAICS codes is also given in Appendix 7.

A10.6 Six-digit NAICS Canada Code

Based on the four-digit NAICS code entered in field A10.5, the software will provide a pick-list of six-digit NAICS Canada codes for the corresponding national industries.

A11. Employee Criteria

A11.1 Number of Full-time Employees

Enter the number of full-time (or equivalent) employees at your facility. This threshold depends specifically on the number of hours worked by all employees at the facility during the calendar year and not on the number of persons working. To determine the number of full-time employee equivalents, total the hours worked by:

  • persons employed at the facility, including students, part-time and term employees
  • owner(s) who performed work on site at the facility, and
  • persons who performed work on site at the facility on a routine basis related to the normal operation of the facility, for the period of time the person performed that work, such as contractors,

and divide the total by 2 000 hours. The total number of hours worked includes paid vacation and sick leave.

A11.2 Activities to Which the 20 000-hour Employee Threshold does not Apply

The 20 000-hour employee threshold does not apply to facilities used for certain types of incineration and for wood preservation. Refer to Step 1 for more information on these activities.

If your facility was used exclusively or mainly for one of the incineration activities (A11.2.a - A11.2.d), you must submit an NPRI report for dioxins/furans and HCB. You may also have to submit a report for any NPRI Part 1 substances, mercury (and its compounds) or PAHs, provided their respective substance criteria are met. If any of the incineration activities (A11.2.a - A11.2.d) are chosen, the corresponding fields in A12.1 will be checked.

Wood preservation alone (A11.2.e) does not trigger NPRI reporting. You may also have to submit a report for any NPRI Part 1 substances and mercury (and its compounds) provided their respective substance criteria are met. If your facility used pentachlorophenol, select field A12.2. You must submit reports for dioxins/furans and HCB (see Step 2, "Schedule 1, Part 4, Substances"). If your facility used creosote for wood preservation, select field A13.1. You must submit NPRI reports for PAHs (see Step 2, "Schedule 1, Part 3, Substances").

Was the facility used mainly or exclusively for:

A11.2.a Non-hazardous solid waste incineration (> 100 tonnes/year) - Non-hazardous solid waste means any waste, regardless of origin, which might normally be disposed of in a non-secure manner, such as at a sanitary landfill site, if not incinerated. It includes clean wood waste, i.e., waste from woodworking or forest product operations, including bark, where the wood waste has not been treated with preservative chemicals (e.g., pentachlorophenol) or decorative coatings. Non-hazardous solid waste incineration includes incineration of residential and other municipal wastes in conical burners, and clean wood waste in beehive burners.

A11.2.b Biomedical or hospital waste incineration (> 100 tonnes/year) - Biomedical waste is defined fully in Appendix 3. Biomedical or hospital waste refers to waste that is generated by:

  • human or animal health-care facilities
  • medical or veterinary research and testing establishments
  • health-care teaching establishments
  • clinical testing or research laboratories, and
  • facilities involved in the production or testing of vaccines.

Biomedical or hospital waste includes human anatomical waste and animal waste. It also includes microbiology laboratory waste, human blood and body fluid waste, and waste sharps that have not been disinfected or decontaminated. It does not include waste from animal husbandry, or waste that is controlled in accordance with the Health of Animals Act (Canada).

Wastes that are household in origin, or that are generated in the food production, general building maintenance and office administration activities of those facilities to which this definition applies, are not considered to be biomedical or hospital waste but rather to be non-hazardous solid waste.

A11.2.c Hazardous waste incineration - Hazardous waste is defined fully in Appendix 4. Hazardous waste includes those wastes that are potentially hazardous to human health and/or the environment because of their nature and quantity, and that require special handling techniques. Hazardous waste incinerators must be licensed or authorized by the responsible jurisdiction. Hazardous waste incinerated in a mobile incinerator temporarily located at your facility must be included as part of this activity.

A11.2.d Sewage sludge incineration - Sludge means a semi-liquid mass removed from a liquid flow of wastes. Sewage sludge means sludge from a facility treating wastewater from a sanitary sewer system. The drying of sludge to reduce water content is part of the incineration stage.

A11.2.e Wood preservation - Select this if your facility was used mainly or exclusively for wood preservation, using heat or pressure treatment or both. If your facility used pentachlorophenol, also select field A12.2. If your facility used creosote, also select field A13.1.

A11.2.f None of the above - If your facility was not used for one of the activities described above, the 20 000-hour employee threshold applies when reporting to the NPRI for any NPRI substance.

A12. Activities Relevant to the Reporting of Dioxins/Furans and Hexachlorobenzene

The criteria for reporting NPRI Part 4 substances is based on specific activities in which a facility engaged, not quantities released or transferred. A facility may have engaged in one of these activities, even if it was not the sole activity at the facility. A facility engaged in one or more of the activities listed below (A12.1.a - A12.1.p) must submit reports for dioxins/furans and HCB if it also met the 20 000-hour employee threshold (see Step 1 "Reporting Criteria for Schedule 1, Part 4, Substances"). If, however, the facility was used mainly or exclusively for any of the incineration activities (A12.1.a - A12.1.d), or for wood preservation using pentachlorophenol (A12.1.q and A12.2), the facility must report releases and transfers of dioxins/furans and HCB regardless of the number of hours worked by employees. Information to be reported for dioxins/furans and HCB differs from that required in other NPRI substance reports. Refer to Step 2, "Schedule 1, Part 4, Substances" for further details.

A12.1.a Non-hazardous solid waste incineration (> 100 tonnes/year) - See A11.2.a.

A12.1.b Biomedical or hospital waste incineration (> 100 tonnes/year) - See A11.2.b.

A12.1.c Hazardous waste incineration - See A11.2.c.

A12.1.d Sewage sludge incineration - See A11.2.d.

A12.1.e Base metals smelting (including copper, lead, nickel and zinc) - refers to copper, lead, nickel and zinc. This activity does not include smelting of aluminum or any other metals. It also does not include the smelting of secondary lead or secondary aluminum which are identified in field A.12.1.f and A.12.1.g, respectively. Smelting is defined in Step 1 "Reporting Criteria for Schedule 1, Part 4, Substances".

A12.1.f Smelting of secondary lead - refers to lead-bearing scrap or lead-bearing materials, other than leadbearing concentrates derived from a mining operation. Facilities engaged in smelting of lead-bearing concentrates derived from a mining operation are considered to be base metals smelters (see A12.1.e).

A12.1.g Smelting of secondary aluminum - refers to aluminum-bearing scrap or aluminum-bearing materials. Secondary aluminum smelting involves two processes - pre-cleaning and smelting - both of which may produce dioxins/furans emissions.

A12.1.h Manufacturing of iron using a sintering process - Sintering is the welding together and growth of contact area between two or more initially distinct particles at temperatures below the melting point, but above one-half of the melting point (in degrees Kelvin). In sintering operations, dioxins/furans may be formed as unwanted by-products during high-temperature decomposition and combustion of raw materials containing chlorine and organic compounds.

A12.1.i Operation of electric arc furnaces in steel manufacturing - In an electric arc furnace, material is heated by the heat energy released from an electric arc. The electric arc is a component of an electric circuit, like a resistor, but with its own peculiar characteristics. Dioxins/furans may be formed as unwanted by-products during high-temperature decomposition and combustion of raw materials containing chlorine and organic compounds.

A12.1.j Operation of electric arc furnaces in steel foundries - In an electric arc furnace, material is heated by the heat energy released from an electric arc during which dioxins/furans and HCB may be formed.

A12.1.k Production of magnesium - Production of magnesium from magnesium chloride by electrolysis may result in the generation of dioxins/furans and HCB.

A12.1.l Manufacturing of portland cement - Portland cement is a fine greyish powder consisting of four basic materials - lime, silica, alumina and iron compounds. Cement production involves heating (pyroprocessing) the raw materials to a high temperature in a rotating kiln to induce chemical reactions that produce a fused material called clinker. The cement clinker is further ground into a fine powder, then mixed with gypsum to form portland cement.

A12.1.m Production of chlorinated organic solvents or chlorinated monomers - This activity is limited to the intentional manufacturing of chlorinated organic solvents or chlorinated monomers, and does not include coincidental production.

A12.1.n Combustion of fossil fuel in a boiler unit to produce electricity (> 25 megawatts) - This activity is limited to the combustion of a fossil fuel in a boiler unit, for the purpose of producing steam for the production of electricity, with a generating capacity of 25 megawatts or greater of electricity. Fossil fuel means a fuel that is in a solid or liquid state at standard temperature and pressure (such as coal, petroleum or any liquid or solid fuel derived from such). It does not include combustion of natural gas or other fuels that are gaseous in form at ambient pressure and temperature. It also does not include diesel generators, which are not boiler units.

A12.1.o Combustion of salt-laden logs in pulp & paper sector - Pulp and paper boilers burning salt-laden wood are unique to British Columbia. Dioxins/furans are emitted from the burning of salt-contaminated hog fuel. Logs transported and stored in salt water take up chlorine into the bark. The bark is stripped from logs and ground up with other waste wood to produce hog fuel. The material is then used as boiler fuel to produce heat and electrical energy for pulp and paper processes. The Canada-Wide Standards for Dioxins and Furans state that every boiler covered by the Standards will be tested twice each year to determine the level of dioxins/furans air emissions for the years prior to 2003, and annually for the year 2003 and beyond.

A12.1.p Combustion of fuel in kraft liquor boilers in pulp & paper sector - A kraft liquor boiler burns black liquor, composed mostly of lignin, the residue from the digester in a kraft (sulphate) pulping process. The boiler recovers chemical products from the combusted black liquor, which are later recycled, and also produces steam which is used in mill process operations.

A12.1.q None of the above - If your facility was not engaged in one of the activities described above, then your facility may not have to submit reports for dioxins/furans and HCB. The only other activity that would trigger reporting is if your facility was used for wood preservation using pentachlorophenol (see field A12.2).

A12.2 Was the Facility Used for Wood Preservation Using Pentachlorophenol?

Wood preservation means the preservation of wood using heat or pressure treatment, or both. If your facility was used for wood preservation using pentachlorophenol, you must submit substance reports for dioxins/furans and HCB, regardless of the number of hours worked by employees. If selected, field A11.2.e - Wood Preservation, will be automatically selected.

A13. Activity Relevant to the Reporting of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

A13.1 Was the Facility Used for Wood Preservation Using Creosote?

Wood preservation means the preservation of wood using heat or pressure treatment, or both. There is no 50-kg reporting threshold for PAHs released or transferred from a wood-preservation process using creosote, since the PAHs are contained in the creosote and not incidentally manufactured. A facility used for wood preservation must report any of the 17 individual PAHs incidentally manufactured and released on site or transferred off site from a wood-preservation process using creosote, regardless of the number of hours worked by employees. If selected, field A11.2.e - Wood Preservation, will be automatically selected.

A14. Other Environmental Regulations or Permits (optional)

This optional field identifies other government organizations, agencies or programs to which you report environmental data. These identifiers may be municipal, provincial, territorial or regional operating permit numbers, certificates of approval or numbers used to identify your facility for a survey on releases or transfers to the environment.

If you wish to provide the environmental identification numbers that exist for your facility, select "Yes" for question A14.1, "Do you report under other environmental regulations or permits?" The electronic form will present a pop-up screen after responding "Yes" to this question. Enter the identification number or permit number in the column entitled "ID Number" and the government and program requesting the data in the column entitled "Government Department, Agency or Program Name".

If you do not report under any other environmental regulations, select "No". If you choose not to complete this field, select "Decline to answer".

Example 1
In Ontario, include the Ontario Hazardous Waste Generator Registration Number (OHWGRN). The OHWGRN is a nine-digit alphanumeric number (e.g., ON1234500) assigned to each facility under Ontario Regulation 347 (Ontario Environmental Protection Act).

Example 2
Facilities located in Alberta handling hazardous waste have to register for, and may have more than one, provincial ID number(s), assigned by Alberta Environmental Protection. Facilities receiving, consigning or transporting hazardous wastes are assigned provincial ID numbers. The ID number is an eight-digit alphanumeric number (e.g., ABR09999).

A15. Comments

A15.1 Comments (Facility)

This field is for comments regarding the facility information provided in this section or on any issue pertaining to your NPRI report in general. For example:

  • an explanation of why a substance is no longer reported to the NPRI
  • details of a plant closure that resulted in reduced releases and transfers of all substances reported by the facility, or
  • details of a one-time site remediation program which dramatically increased the off-site transfers of several substances.

These comments will appear in the NPRI database available to the public and are your opportunity to provide context for the information reported to the NPRI. Comments specific to a substance being reported should be provided in the "Substances" report.

A15.2 Comments (Pollution Prevention)

In addition to the pollution-prevention (P2) activities reported for a specific substance in B30, information on general P2 activities such as water- and energy-conservation initiatives can be provided in this comments field. Facilities are encouraged to provide additional information describing their P2 initiatives and the results achieved (e.g., environmental results, economic benefits, etc.).

A16. Company Official Certifying this Submission

A "Statement of Certification" can be printed through the "Print Reports Menu". If you are unable to print a Statement of Certification, contact your regional NPRI office immediately. A brief summary of the NPRI report is printed as part of the Statement of Certification. It lists the reporting facilities, their substances and the total quantities of substances released on site and/or transferred off site for disposal or recycling.

The NPRI report submitted to Environment Canada must include a Statement of Certification signed by an official of the company. Normally, the company official is the person identified in field A16. This person must have delegated powers to accept legal responsibility for the information provided. Some facilities may choose a CEO, the environmental coordinator or the plant manager. The person who signs this statement acknowledges that:

  • he/she has reviewed the documents
  • he/she has exercised due diligence to ensure that the information is true and complete, and
  • the amounts and values are accurate, based on reasonable estimates using available data.

The name of the company official will not appear in the public database.

A17. Company Official Address

If the mailing address for the company official contact is different from the facility's site address (A2), complete this field as described in A5.


This is the end of the first section of the reporting form. You have the options of saving the facility information, cancelling the changes or returning to the facility report.

Return to the "View / Enter / Edit Data"menu and proceed to Step 5.


To add or modify a substance report, choose "Substances" from the "View / Enter / Edit Data"menu. A substance report consists of the following sections:

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