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Guidance for the Reporting of Tailings and Waste Rock to the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI)

Preface

This document was developed to guide NPRI reporting facilities that may be affected by the recent Canada Gazette (CG) notices, and will need to comply and report tailings and waste rock to the NPRI program, for 2006 and beyond.


Introduction

On April 23, 2009, the Federal Court found that the Minister erred in his interpretation of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA, 1999) by not requiring, through the NPRI, information on releases and transfers to tailings and waste rock disposal areas by mining facilities and making this information available to the public.

The Court ordered the Minister to “…publish pollutant release information to the public through the NPRI in relation to releases and transfers to tailings and waste rock disposal areas by mining facilities for the 2006 and subsequent reporting years…”

The requirements for 2006 through 2009 were published through two separate notices in Part I of the CG under the authority of section 46 of the CEPA, 1999 on December 5, 2009. The reporting deadline to comply with both notices is June 1, 2010.

  1. Notice with respect to tailings and waste rock reporting through the NPRI for 2006 to 2008: Requirements for the 2006 through 2008 reporting years concern only NPRI substances moved to tailing and waste rock management areas at mine operations within specific mining sectors.
  2. Notice with respect to substances in the NPRI for 2009: The requirements for 2009 reporting are very similar to those published for 2008, but the reporting requirements for waste rock and tailings can apply to any facility that generates waste rock and tailings.
  3. The ongoing mine waste reporting requirements, for 2010 and future years, are expected to be included in future annual notices for the NPRI.

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Definitions

The majority of the NPRI definitions already in use were not changed as a result of the addition of tailings and waste rock reporting. The term “disposal” was significantly altered during the development of the latest two NPRI Canada Gazette Notices. You will find below the list of selected working definitions.

  • “Inert” is a material that does not release NPRI substances.
  • “Ore” is a natural mineral or bitumen deposit in which at least one mineral occurs in sufficient concentrations to make mining the mineral economically feasible.
  • “Overburden” is the unconsolidated materials overlying the ore (or bitumen) deposit, including but not limited to soil, glacial deposits, sand, and sediment. (Adapted from Environment Canada’s Metal Mining Code of Practice)
  • “Tailings”is the waste material, which may or may not be mixed with water that remains after processing of ore, ore concentrate or mined materials to extract marketable components such as metals, minerals or bitumen. This could include ground rock material, sand, clay, process chemicals or residual metals, minerals or bitumen, petroleum coke (petcoke) and sulphur.
  • "Waste rock" is rock which is removed in the mining process to provide access to the ore, and is not further processed during the reporting year.

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Sector description

The main activities associated with the mine life cycle may include:1

  • line cutting, drilling, trenching and bulk sampling;
  • development of mine workings and construction of associated infrastructure;
  • extraction of ore;
  • management of mine and site drainage;
  • ore processing;
  • disposal of waste rock, tailings and other wastes; and
  • site reclamation activities.

Mining facilities are faced with the challenge of managing large volumes of ore, waste rock, and tailings. Figure 1 describes the typical activities of the mine operations phase.

Figure 1 - Typical activities of the mine operations phase ( Environmental Code of Practice for Metal Mines, 2009)

Figure 1 - Typical Activities of the Mine Operations Phase

1. Underground mines

In underground mines, the ore is extracted through a series of vertical shafts and ramps and horizontal drifts and adits (see Figure 2). Extraction is more selective than in open pit mining, and the ratio of waste rock to ore generated is much lower. In about one half of Canadian underground mines, waste rock is used as mine backfill to provide roof and wall support underground. Waste rock that is not used for construction or as backfill is disposed of on the surface.

Figure 2 – Series of vertical shafts and ramps and horizontal drifts and adits to extract the ore ( Environmental Code of Practice for Metal Mines, 2009)

Figure 2 – Series of Vertical Shafts and Ramps and Horizontal Drifts and Adits to Extract the Ore

2. Ore processing

Once ore is extracted from a mine it is processed to recover the valuable minerals. Ore typically consists of small amounts of valuable minerals in close association with much larger amounts of waste minerals of no economic value (gangue). The valuable ore minerals are separated (liberated) from the gangue in milling operations to obtain higher quality metal. Major steps in ore processing include grinding and crushing, chemical/physical separation and dewatering.

3. Grinding and crushing

Grinding and crushing of ore is undertaken to physically liberate valuable minerals prior to separation by physical and chemical processes. Crushing is done dry, and is used for coarse size reduction. Grinding is used to achieve finer size reduction. Grinding is conducted wet, and chemicals such as lime, soda ash, sodium cyanide, and sulphur dioxide may be added in the grinding circuit in preparation for ore separation. Ore must be ground fine enough to liberate the ore minerals from the gangue or subsequent separation methods will not be as effective.

4. Ore separation

Ore separation may be done using physical or chemical separation methods. The end product of ore separation is an ore concentrate. After separation, some ore concentrates are sent for further processing, such as smelting, to produce pure metal for sale.

A by-product of ore separation is tailings, which are a mixture of water and finely ground rock from which most of the minerals of value have been removed. Tailings may still contain metal-bearing minerals, and the mixture may also contain residues of reagents used in ore processing.

Physical Separation Processes: Physical separation processes exploit differences in the physical properties or behaviour of mineral particles, such as size, density and surface energy. The bulk of the mineral is not chemically altered, although chemical reagents may be used to help in the separation process. Commonly used physical separation processes are as follows:

  • Gravity Separation: Minerals can be separated on the basis of differences in density, particularly for iron ore and gold, as well as tungsten, tantalum and niobium. Gravity separation may also be used to pre-concentrate metallic minerals prior to further processing. Gravity separation tends to require the use of smaller amounts of process reagents than some other ore separation methods.
  • Magnetic Separation: Minerals can be separated on the basis of differences in magnetic susceptibility. Magnetic separation has been used in Canada to separate iron ore from waste minerals, to remove magnetite (iron oxide) and pyrrhotite (iron sulphide) from base metal ores prior to flotation, and to recover magnetite from copper concentrates. Like gravity separation, magnetic separation tends to require the use of smaller amounts of process reagents than some other ore separation methods.
  • Flotation Separation: Flotation is used for the separation of a wide variety of minerals on the basis of differences in surface properties of minerals in contact with air and water. It is the dominant process for the recovery of base metal ores and is also used in uranium and gold processing operations. To separate minerals using flotation, fine air bubbles are introduced into a mixture of ground ore in water, known as a slurry. In this slurry, mineral particles collide with air bubbles, and minerals that favour contact with air attach to the air bubbles and float to the surface of the flotation cell. As air bubbles accumulate at the surface, a froth forms and eventually overflows as the flotation cell concentrate. Minerals that favour contact with water remain in the slurry and go to the flotation cell tailings. A number of chemical reagents are used to aid the process.

Chemical Separation Processes: Chemical separation processes involve the preferential leaching of one or more minerals, particularly for the recovery of gold, silver and uranium and in some cases copper. A number of chemical processes are used for ore separation:

  • Leaching with Cyanide: This is the dominant method for recovery of metallic gold or silver. A dilute solution of calcium or sodium cyanide is used to dissolve the metal. Following leaching, metals are recovered from the solution by adsorption directly from the leach slurry onto activated carbon granules or by the addition of zinc dust to the solution which causes the precious metals to precipitate from the solution.
  • Leaching with Sulphuric Acid: Uranium ores are processed using sulphuric acid to dissolve the uranium. The uranium is then removed from the solution using ion exchange or solvent extraction, which results in the adsorption of uranium on a resin or organic solvent. The uranium is then removed from the resin or solvent. In some cases, copper ores are also leached with sulphuric acid.

5. Dewatering

The ore concentrates obtained from most physical ore separation processes are slurries with high water content that must be dewatered prior to further processing. Dewatering involves two processes, i.e., thickening and filtration. In thickening, slurries are thickened by gravity settling. The excess water is decanted off and may be recycled in the milling processes. After thickening, the slurry is passed through a vacuum filter, which traps the particulates. Most of the remaining water is removed.

6. Mine closure

Mines are closed when the ore minerals are completely exhausted or when it is no longer profitable to recover the minerals that remain. In some cases, mines may be closed temporarily and put into a status called “care and maintenance,” also known as temporary suspension.

This is frequently done during periods of low commodity prices in the expectation that higher prices in the future will make further commercial operations financially viable.  Eventually, ore reserves are depleted, and mines are permanently closed.

The above list is illustrative and not exhaustive.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Details provided for ‘Sector Description’ were obtained from Chapter 2 (pages 25-31) of Environment Canada’s Environmental Code of Practice for Metal Mines.

Return to footnote 1 

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Reporting to the NPRI

Appendix 4 provides a step-by-step approach summarizing the following information.

The owner or operator of the facility as of December 31, 2009 is required to report for 2006 to 2008 years, and for 2009. If the facility closed during that period, the last owner or operator of the facility is required to report.

1. 2006-2008 reporting

The 2006-2008 Canada Gazette (CG) notice is applicable to facilities from the bitumen, coal, diamonds, metals, and potash sectors that generated or disposed of tailings and/or waste rock during those years. A facility is subject to the 2006-2008 CG notice if, during one or more of the 2006-2008 calendar years:

  • employees at the facility worked 20 000 hours or more; and
  • the facility generated or disposed of tailings or waste rock as a result of the extraction or recovery of bitumen, coal, diamonds, metals or potash, or the extraction or beneficiation of metallic ore or ore concentrate.

2. 2009 reporting

For 2009 all facilities are subject to the tailings and waste rock requirements. If a facility from any sector disposes of tailings or waste rock, they must report on this disposal if they meet the applicable reporting criteria. Sectors that dispose of tailings and waste rock may include, but are not limited to, such sectors as coal, diamonds, potash, oil sands, metals, which include copper, nickel, lead, zinc, gold, silver, iron ore, and uranium, quarries, industrial minerals, and other applicable non-mining sectors.

In order to report the relevant information to the NPRI, Appendix 1 has been included to facilitate the reporting of tailings and waste rock for 2006-2008 and 2009. This Appendix specifically provides the key highlights per each CG notice as well as a relative comparison of the differences between the two notices regarding the reporting of tailings and waste rock. Figure 3 below summarises the reportable, and non-reportable mine materials to assist reporter in their duties.

3. Substances

For 2006-2008, the reporting of substances found in tailings and waste rock only applies to substances in Part 1 and Part 2 of Schedule 1 of the notice.

For 2009, reporting of substances disposed of to tailings and waste rock management areas applies only for substances in Parts 1, 2 and 3 of Schedule 1 of the notice.

Complete lists of NPRI substances for 2006-2008 and 2009 regarding the reporting of tailings and waste rock are provided in Appendices 2 and 3, respectively.

4. Exclusions

The key areas of exclusions related to tailings and waste rock are outlined under the sections below.

Under the Reporting Requirements section, quantities that are excluded from the mass reporting thresholds are also excluded from being reported to the NPRI. 

The following exclusions only apply to substances contained in the materials below. Once the substance is released to air or surface waters from the materials below (for example, dust released while moving overburden and leaching of metals from tailings or waste rock), the quantity of the substance released must then be included in the threshold calculations and reported to the NPRI if applicable.

Figure 3 – Diagram of reportable and non-reportable mine materials

Figure 3 – Diagram of Reportable and Non-reportable Mine Materials

i. Overburden

This material is excluded from threshold calculations and reporting.  See definition of overburden in section 3 of this Guide.

ii. Stable/ inert constituents of tailings

Since these materials are expected to be stable/ inert, and have not been altered during the ore processing, they are not included in threshold calculations or reported values, provided that they meets the following conditions:

  •   Only inert, inorganic components are excluded
  •   The component must not have been reduced in size or otherwise physically or chemically altered.

This applies only to the components of tailings that meet the criteria (i.e., if part of the tailings stream met the criteria, only that portion of the tailings would be excluded and the other components would be required to be included).

In summary, certain materials in tailings that are inert, inorganic and have not been crushed or otherwise physically or chemically altered, are excluded from threshold calculations and reporting (e.g. sand grains from bitumen mines or in-situ production of bitumen).

iii. Waste rock

In some cases, in particular for the uranium industry, mining operations have operating permits that classify the waste rock generated by that facility. Where a valid operating permit specifically identifies waste rock that is considered inert (or clean, the term generally used in the mining industry), the NPRI substances found in that waste rock is to be excluded from threshold calculations and reporting.

Where there is not a valid operating permit that specifies that waste rock is considered inert, the exclusion is based on following criteria in terms of sulphur and arsenic content, and acid generating potential.

  • Acid generating potential: Waste rock is to be excluded if it has a sulphur content of less than or equal to 0.2 percent, or if it has a higher sulphur content but the ratio of neutralizing potential to acid generating potential is greater than or equal to 3:1.
  • Arsenic content: Since the release of arsenic is not necessarily linked to acid generation potential, the quantity of arsenic in waste rock must be included where the concentration of arsenic in the waste rock is greater than 12 mg of arsenic per kg of waste rock, even if the waste rock would be excluded for other substances based on the criteria related to acid generating potential.
  • Where a quantity of an NPRI substance in waste rock is excluded based on these factors, the facility would be required to provide adequate information on the permit or other data on which the exclusion was based.

Note: If NPRI substances are released from waste rock that is excluded based on the criteria above, the quantities of NPRI substances released must then be included.

Please refer to the waste rock sampling techniques documents as referenced in the Reference and Bibliography section.

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Criteria for reporting of substances

It is important to note that the NPRI substances listed in the 2009 Canada Gazette (CG) notice have not changed as a result of the addition of tailings and waste rock reporting.

A facility subject to an NPRI CG notice must consider whether the criterion for each NPRI substance is met for the year in question, to determine whether they are required to report for that substance.

1. Concentration threshold

The following concentration thresholds apply for Schedule 1, Part 1 substances: 

  • Tailings: For substances contained in tailings, there is no minimum concentration threshold when determining whether the manufactured, processed, or otherwise used (MPO) threshold is met. 
  • Waste Rock: For substances from Schedule 1, Part 1, Group 1, the normal 1% by wt concentration threshold applies. For substances from Schedule 1, Part 1, Groups 2, 3 and 4, there is no minimum concentration threshold.

For 2006-2008, the threshold calculation is not limited to the quantity of an NPRI substance found in tailings and waste rock. When determining whether the reporting threshold is met for a substance, the facility is required to include all of its operations/ processes in the calculation. This approach will provide greater consistency between 2006-2008 requirements and those for 2009 and onwards, where the thresholds will also be based on total quantities and is not specific to mine waste.

For 2006-2008, facilities that are subject to the CG notice would need to report on all previously reported substances from Parts 1 and 2 of Schedule 1, since they were already above the threshold before the inclusion of tailings and waste rock. As such, there may be cases where mines would need to report a “zero” quantity for disposals to tailings or waste rock management areas – if they exceeded the threshold for a substance due to non-mine-waste-related activities and therefore are required to report for that substance, but did not dispose of that substance to tailings or waste rock management areas. For substances that were not previously required to be reported, the facility would need to determine if thresholds were met for a particular year with the inclusion of tailings and waste rock, and report if needed.

Previously, for Part 2 substances, reporting was only required for quantities of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) that were incidentally manufactured. As such, the criteria for reporting of Part 2 substances was expanded to cover the mining industry, specifically oil sands, which do not “incidentally manufacture” PAHs if they are already present in the bitumen, by adding “as a result of the generation of tailings” to the requirements.

Table 1 below lists NPRI substances commonly associated with the chemical composition of mine tailings and waste rock. The following list is provided for your reference only – you must consider all substances in the NPRI notices.

Table 1 - NPRI substances commonly associated with the chemical composition of mine tailings and waste rock
Type of mineSubstances
Coal minesAntimony
Arsenic
Cadmium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Lead
Manganese
Mercury
Nickel
Selenium
Silver
Vanadium
Zinc
Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)
Metal minesAluminum
Antimony
Arsenic
Cadmium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Lead
Manganese
Mercury
Nickel
Selenium
Silver
Vanadium
Zinc
Ammonia
Cyanides
Hydrogen fluoride
2-Mercaptobenzothiazole
Naphthalene
Nitrate ion
p-Phenylenediamine
Toluene
Oil/tar sandsAluminum
Arsenic
Chromium
Copper
Lead
Nickel
Zinc
Ammonia
Cyanides
Phenol
BTEX (Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Xylene)
PAHs

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Questions and answers

  1. A facility has identified a number of NPRI substances that meet the tailings and waste rock reporting requirements for 2006. Would this listing be applicable in every reporting year between 2006 and 2009?

    The substances that are required to be reported for tailings and waste rock is based on the calculation of the mass reporting threshold for manufactured, processed, or otherwise used manufactured, processed, or otherwise used (MPO) for each individual reporting year. It is expected that due to the large quantities of tailings and waste rock, the same substances would meet the threshold determination for each reporting year. It should be noted that the number of speciated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) for NPRI reporting has increased from 20 in 2006 to 29 for 2009. The 2006 to 2008 notice requires reporting on the 29 PAHs, and therefore you may need to report on additional PAHs for 2006 and 2007.

  2. What is overburden? Are the substances in overburden required to be reported to the NPRI?

    Overburden is the unconsolidated materials that exist between the top soil and ore or bitumen deposit. The substances contained within this material are excluded from the reporting threshold calculations and as a result reporting to the NPRI.

  3. A metal mine uses cyanide-compounds in a gold leaching operation to extract gold from ore. Cyanide that would otherwise be lost during the liberation of cyanide from the gold-cyanide complexes is able to be recovered from the tailings, and re-used to leach more gold from the ore pile.  How should the facility consider these cyanides for threshold determination, and how should they be reported for the disposal at the tailings management area?

    The cyanides should be considered towards all MPO activities for the mass threshold determination. This is because the cyanides are used to react with the gold in the ore in the first place, and they are manufactured as the gold cyanide, and are then processed as a reactant since the gold from the compound is distributed into commerce. The cyanides should be reported as the net quantity disposed at the tailings management area, regardless of the number of recovery process for the flotation agent (cyanides) in the tailings circuit that has taken place.

  4. What industrial sectors could be required to report tailings or waste rock in 2009, but not for 2006 to 2008?

    For 2009, sectors that could be required to report for mine waste include, but are not limited to the following: (1) aluminum smelters could have the tailings containing “red mud” deposited on site in the tailings management area for the required reporting, (2) the Lime Manufacturing Sector could be required to report the substances in the limestone as part of the waste rock management located on the same site, (3) pits and quarries.

  5. For potash and limestone mines, are trace metals and other substances that are found in natural earth/rock reportable to the NPRI?

    The main components that are found in potash mines and limestone are salts of sodium, magnesium, potassium and calcium chlorides and sulphates. These specific substances are not found on the NPRI substance list. However, trace metals or other NPRI substance would be reportable if the applicable thresholds are met, subject to the exclusions.

  6. Should strong acids that are neutralized prior to their disposal be reported to the NPRI as disposals in tailings and waste rock management areas?

    Acids that are neutralized prior to being disposed of in tailings and waste rock management areas should not be reported as being disposed to tailings and/or waste rock. Please note that the use of any acid listed on the NPRI must be considered when calculating whether applicable NPRI thresholds are met.

  7. How should a facility report on an annual “net quantity” to the NPRI?

    Consideration of the "net quantity" of NPRI substances being disposed on-site refers to the "reprocessing of materials" in a given reporting year. For this exercise, you do not need to account for the internal movement of waste rock material if it is completed in the same type of management area. However, you need to consider the quantities of “additions” and “removals” accordingly if the material is moved from waste rock management area to tailings management area or vice versa. The “net quantity” that should be reported to the NPRI is the final amount of NPRI substances that either added or removed at the end of the applicable calendar year. For some facilities, their net quantity will be a positive value and for other facilities it will be a negative value.

  8. Are decommissioned mines subjected to the NPRI tailing and waste rock reporting requirements?

    Decommissioned mines are normally expected to comply with the good practice of mine reclamation. Any NPRI substances that are associated with reclamation activities must be considered toward threshold and reporting calculation since the activities are no different than the management of "tailings" and "waste rock".

  9. A mine has accumulated waste rock that meets the exclusion criteria set out in the notices over a number of years. It now wants to use some of this material to build a road on site and to then sell some of the remaining material as construction aggregate. It will have to crush and screen material for these uses. Does it have to consider this activity in its reporting threshold and how is this to be reported to the NPRI?

    The crushing and screening of the material is not one of the criteria for determining whether the waste rock is to be reported. This activity would not affect the exclusions applicable to this waste rock. However, the facility will have to consider the amount of particulate matter generated in the threshold for reporting and may have to report emissions of Total Particulate matter (TPM), Particulate matter less than or equal to 10 microns (PM10) or Particulate matter of a size less than or equal to 2.5 microns (PM2.5). The threshold for reporting substances in Part 4 of Schedule 1 of the annual NPRI notices is based on releases to air.

  10. A mine has accumulated a quantity of waste rock over a number of years, and reported the amount of lead and mercury sent to waste rock management areas under the 2006 to 2008 notice for mine waste reporting. The material is now (for 2009) being moved to another location on site. How does this affect reporting?

    If the material is being sent from one waste rock management area to another waste rock management area on site, then no new reporting is required.

  11. How are we to report on PAHs when we do not know the amount of individual species?

    When there is no information on the species, report the PAHs under: “PAHs, total unspeciated”  If you have information on species from some processes, but not others, report the releases, disposals and transfers of the species for those processes where this information is available. Report for the other processes under “PAHs, total unspeciated”. See section 4.6 of the reporting guide.

  12. I use tailings to fill in stopes or as pillars to provide support for the surrounding rock in an underground mine. How do I report this?

    In this situation, the tailings material containing NPRI substances are used as part of the structure of the facility. As a result, the general exclusion for structural components of the facility applies.The NPRI substances found in the tailings used for underground fill are not reported. However, the net disposal of NPRI substances to the tailings management area are reported. If the quantity of NPRI substances in fill removed from the tailings management area(s) exceeds the amount sent to the tailings management area(s) in any given year, a negative quantity (net withdrawal from tailings management area) is to be reported.

  13. Coal mining operations produce coarse and fine rejects as a result of the separation of rock from coal washing operations.  Should these rejects be reported as waste rock or as tailings to the NPRI?

    For the purposes of reporting to the NPRI, materials separated from coal are considered tailings whether they are coarse rejects or fines. These materials cannot be considered waste rock since they are processed and removed from the coal to be transferred into a tailings management area. By definition, waste rock is not processed in any way except to remove it and store it at another location.

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References and bibliography

  • Environment and Climate Change Canada (2009). “Environmental Code of Practice for Metal Mines 2009”, TD195 M5 E58 2009.
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada (2010). “2009 Guide for Reporting to the National Pollutant Release Inventory, Canadian Environmental Protection Action 1999”, publication date (to be determined).
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada (2009). “Notice with respect to tailings and waste rock reporting under the National Pollutant Release Inventory for 2006 to 2008”, Canada Gazette, Part I, December 5, 2009.
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada (2009). “Notice with respect to substances in the National Pollutant Release Inventory for 2009”, Canada Gazette, Part I, December 5, 2009.
  • Natural Resources Canada (1994). “Handbook for Waste Rock Sampling Techniques”, June 1994.
  • Natural Resources Canada (1994). “Review of Waste Rock Sampling Techniques”, June 1994.
  • U.S. EPA (1999). “EPCRA Section 313 Industry Guidance – Metal Mining Facilities”, January 1999.

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Appendix 1: Comparison of 2006-2008 and 2009 NPRI reporting requirements for tailings and waste rock

Appendix 1 – Comparison of 2006-2008 and 2009 NPRI reporting requirements for tailings and waste rock
DescriptionDetails of applicability for 2006-2008 NPRI reporting of tailings and waste rockDetails of applicability for 2009 NPRI reporting of tailings and waste rock
Legislative requirementsPublished on December 5, 2009 in the Canada Gazette Part I Notice with respect to tailings and waste rock reporting under the National Pollutant Release Inventory for 2006 to 2008Published on December 5, 2009 in the Canada Gazette Part I Notice with respect to substances in the National Pollutant Release Inventory for 2009
What is the deadline date to comply with this notice?June 1, 2010June 1, 2010
What substances are required to be reported for disposals in tailings and waste rock management areas?

Only substances from Parts 1 and 2 are included in the 2006-2008 notice. 

A substance report, including information on disposals to tailings and waste rock management areas, is required for each of the above NPRI substances for which the applicable mass reporting threshold is met or exceeded. 

For 2009, NPRI substances in Parts 1, 2, and 3 are applicable for reporting on tailings and waste rock.

A substance report, including information on disposals to tailings and waste rock management areas, is required for each of the above NPRI substances for which the applicable mass reporting threshold is met or exceeded.

Which sectors are required to report NPRI substances in tailings and waste rock?The 2006-2008 notice is limited to facilities from the bitumen, coal, diamonds, metals, and potash sectors that generated or disposed of tailings or waste rock during at least one of those years.For 2009 reporting, facilities from other industry sectors beyond mining are subject to the tailings and waste rock requirements.  As such, if a facility from any sector disposes of waste rock or tailings, they would need to report on it (provided they meet thresholds and have information on NPRI substances in the waste rock or tailings, and subject to the exclusions for inert materials).
What facilities are subject to the notice?

Facilities are subject to the 2006-2008 notice if, during one or more of the 2006-2008 calendar years:

  • employees at the facility worked 20 000 hours or more; and
  • the facility generated or disposed of tailings or waste rock as a result of the extraction or recovery of bitumen, coal, diamonds, metals or potash, or the extraction or beneficiation of metallic ore or ore concentrate.
The general NPRI requirements apply for the 2009 notice – this would include facilities beyond the mining sector.
Who is required to report?The owner or operator of the facility as of December 31, 2009 is required to report for the 2006-2008 years.   If the facility closed during that period, the last owner or operator of the facility is required to report.The owner or operator of the facility as of December 31, 2009 is required to report for the 2009 NPRI.
Are there any exclusions specific to tailings and waste rock that should be considered in the determination of the mass reporting thresholds?

NPRI substances contained in the following materials should be excluded from the determination of the mass reporting threshold:

  1. Unconsolidated overburden
  2. Component of tailings that are inert, inorganic and have not been crushed or otherwise altered.
  3. Inert waste rock – refer to Guide for more details about what is inert and what is not

NPRI substances contained in the following materials should be excluded from the determination of the mass reporting threshold:

  1. Unconsolidated overburden
  2. Component of tailings that are inert, inorganic and have not been crushed or otherwise altered.
  3. Inert waste rock – refer to Guide for more details about what is inert and what is not
Once a facility has met the reporting threshold for reporting mine wastes, what information is required to be reported to the NPRI?

The general information requirements for the 2006-2008 notice include the following:

  • information is based on information the person has reasonable access to;
  • there is a requirement to use monitoring data, if required under other legislation;
  • the person is not required to report quantities if they are excluded from threshold calculations (i.e. overburden, etc.);
  • certification of the report is required; and
  • quantities would be reported in tonnes or kg as normal for that substance.

The owner or operator of a facility subject to the notice, and which met the criteria for one or more listed substances during one or more of the reporting years, would be required to submit a report by June 1, 2010.

Please consult this Guide and the 2006-2008 notice for a complete listing of information that is required to be submitted to Environment and Climate Change Canada by June 1, 2010.

The general information requirements for the 2009 notice include the following:

  • information is based on information the person has reasonable access to;
  • there is a requirement to use monitoring data, if required under other legislation;
  • the person is not required to report quantities if they are excluded from threshold calculations (i.e. overburden, etc.);
  • certification of the report is required; and
  • quantities would be reported in tonnes or kg as normal for that substance.

The owner or operator of a facility subject to the notice, and which met the criteria for one or more listed substances during one or more of the reporting years, would be required to submit a report by June 1, 2010.

Please consult this Guide and the 2009 notice for a complete listing of information that is required to be submitted to Environment and Climate Change Canada by June 1, 2010.

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Appendix 2: 2006-2008 NPRI substances and reporting for tailings and waste rock

Part 1A Substances
Part 1B Substances
Part 2 Substances


Part 1A substances
NameCAS number(1)
Acetaldehyde75-07-0
Acetonitrile75-05-8
Acetophenone98-86-2
Acrolein107-02-8
Acrylamide79-06-1
Acrylic acid(2)79-10-7
Acrylonitrile107-13-1
Alkanes, C6-18, chloro68920-70-7
Alkanes, C10-13, chloro85535-84-8
Allyl alcohol107-18-6
Allyl chloride107-05-1
Aluminum(3)7429-90-5
Aluminum oxide(4)1344-28-1
Ammonia (total) (5)*
Aniline(2)62-53-3
Anthracene120-12-7
Antimony(6)*
Asbestos(7)1332-21-4
Benzene71-43-2
Benzoyl chloride98-88-4
Benzoyl peroxide94-36-0
Benzyl chloride100-44-7
Biphenyl92-52-4
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate103-23-1
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate117-81-7
Boron trifluoride7637-07-2
Bromine7726-95-6
1-Bromo-2-chloroethane107-04-0
Bromomethane74-83-9
1,3-Butadiene106-99-0
2-Butoxyethanol111-76-2
Butyl acrylate141-32-2
i-Butyl alcohol78-83-1
n-Butyl alcohol71-36-3
sec-Butyl alcohol78-92-2
tert-Butyl alcohol75-65-0
Butyl benzyl phthalate85-68-7
1,2-Butylene oxide106-88-7
Butyraldehyde123-72-8
C.I. Acid Green 34680-78-8
C.I. Basic Green 4569-64-2
C.I. Basic Red 1989-38-8
C.I. Direct Blue 21828407-37-6
C.I. Disperse Yellow 32832-40-8
C.I. Food Red 1581-88-9
C.I. Solvent Orange 73118-97-6
C.I. Solvent Yellow 14842-07-9
Calcium cyanide156-62-7
Calcium fluoride7789-75-5
Carbon disulphide75-15-0
Carbon tetrachloride56-23-5
Carbonyl sulphide463-58-1
Catechol120-80-9
CFC-1175-69-4
CFC-1275-71-8
CFC-1375-72-9
CFC-11476-14-2
CFC-11576-15-3
Chlorendic acid115-28-6
Chlorine7782-50-5
Chlorine dioxide10049-04-4
Chloroacetic acid(2)79-11-8
Chlorobenzene108-90-7
Chloroethane75-00-3
Chloroform67-66-3
Chloromethane74-87-3
3-Chloro-2-methyl-1-propene563-47-3
3-Chloropropionitrile542-76-7
Chromium(8)*
Cobalt(6)*
Copper(6)*
Cresol(2, 9)1319-77-3
Crotonaldehyde4170-30-3
Cumene98-82-8
Cumene hydroperoxide80-15-9
Cyanides(10)*
Cyclohexane110-82-7
Cyclohexanol108-93-0
Decabromodiphenyl oxide1163-19-5
2,4-Diaminotoluene (2)95-80-7
2,6-Di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol128-37-0
Dibutyl phthalate84-74-2
o -Dichlorobenzene95-50-1
p -Dichlorobenzene106-46-7
3,3’-Dichlorobenzidine dihydrochloride612-83-9
1,2-Dichloroethane107-06-2
Dichloromethane75-09-2
2,4-Dichlorophenol (2)120-83-2
1,2-Dichloropropane78-87-5
Dicyclopentadiene77-73-6
Diethanolamine(2)111-42-2
Diethyl phthalate84-66-2
Diethyl sulphate64-67-5
Dimethylamine124-40-3
N,N-Dimethylaniline(2)121-69-7
N,N-Dimethylformamide68-12-2
Dimethyl phenol1300-71-6
Dimethyl phthalate131-11-3
Dimethyl sulphate77-78-1
4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol(2)534-52-1
2,4-Dinitrotoluene121-14-2
2,6-Dinitrotoluene606-20-2
Dinitrotoluene(11)25321-14-6
Di-n-octyl phthalate117-84-0
1,4-Dioxane123-91-1
Diphenylamine122-39-4
Epichlorohydrin106-89-8
2-Ethoxyethanol110-80-5
2-Ethoxyethyl acetate111-15-9
Ethyl acrylate140-88-5
Ethylbenzene100-41-4
Ethyl chloroformate541-41-3
Ethylene74-85-1
Ethylene glycol107-21-1
Ethylene oxide75-21-8
Ethylene thiourea96-45-7
Fluorine7782-41-4
Formaldehyde50-00-0
Formic acid64-18-6
Halon 1211353-59-3
Halon 130175-63-8
HCFC-2275-45-6
HCFC-122 and all isomers(12)41834-16-6
HCFC-123 and all isomers(13)34077-87-7
HCFC 124 and all isomers(14)63938-10-3
HCFC-141b1717-00-6
HCFC-142b75-68-3
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene77-47-4
Hexachloroethane67-72-1
Hexachlorophene70-30-4
n -Hexane110-54-3
Hydrazine(2)302-01-2
Hydrochloric acid7647-01-0
Hydrogen cyanide74-90-8
Hydrogen fluoride7664-39-3
Hydrogen sulphide7783-06-4
Hydroquinone(2)123-31-9
Iron pentacarbonyl13463-40-6
Isobutyraldehyde78-84-2
Isophorone diisocyanate4098-71-9
Isoprene78-79-5
Isopropyl alcohol67-63-0
p,p’-Isopropylidenediphenol80-05-7
Isosafrole120-58-1
Lithium carbonate554-13-2
Maleic anhydride108-31-6
Manganese(6)*
2-Mercaptobenzothiazole149-30-4
Methanol67-56-1
2-Methoxyethanol109-86-4
2-Methoxyethyl acetate110-49-6
Methyl acrylate96-33-3
Methyl tert-butyl ether1634-04-4
p,p’ -Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline)101-14-4
1,1‑Methylenebis (4-isocyanatocyclohexane)5124-30-1
Methylenebis (phenylisocyanate)101-68-8
p,p’ -Methylenedianiline101-77-9
Methyl ethyl ketone78-93-3
Methyl iodide74-88-4
Methyl isobutyl ketone108-10-1
Methyl methacrylate80-62-6
N-Methylolacrylamide924-42-5
2-Methylpyridine109-06-8
N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone872-50-4
Michler’s ketone(2)90-94-8
Molybdenum trioxide1313-27-5
Naphthalene91-20-3
Nickel(6)*
Nitrate ion(15)*
Nitric acid7697-37-2
Nitrilotriacetic acid(2)139-13-9
p -Nitroaniline100-01-6
Nitrobenzene98-95-3
Nitroglycerin55-63-0
p -Nitrophenol(2)100-02-7
2-Nitropropane79-46-9
N-Nitrosodiphenylamine86-30-6
Nonylphenol and its ethoxylates(16)*
Octylphenol and its ethoxylates(17)*
Paraldehyde123-63-7
Pentachloroethane76-01-7
Peracetic acid(2)79-21-0
Phenol(2)108-95-2
p -Phenylenediamine(2)106-50-3
o -Phenylphenol(2)90-43-7
Phosgene75-44-5
Phosphorus(18)7723-14-0
Phosphorus (total) (19)*
Phthalic anhydride85-44-9
Polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate9016-87-9
Potassium bromate7758-01-2
Propargyl alcohol107-19-7
Propionaldehyde123-38-6
Propylene115-07-1
Propylene oxide75-56-9
Pyridine(2)110-86-1
Quinoline(2)91-22-5
p-Quinone106-51-4
Safrole94-59-7
Selenium(6)*
Silver(6)*
Sodium fluoride7681-49-4
Sodium nitrite7632-00-0
Styrene100-42-5
Styrene oxide96-09-3
Sulphurhexafluoride2551-62-4
Sulphuric acid7664-93-9
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane630-20-6
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane79-34-5
Tetrachloroethylene127-18-4
Tetracycline hydrochloride64-75-5
Thiourea62-56-6
Thorium dioxide1314-20-1
Titanium tetrachloride7550-45-0
Toluene108-88-3
Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate584-84-9
Toluene-2,6-diisocyanate91-08-7
Total reduced sulphur(20)*
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene120-82-1
Toluenediisocyanate (11)26471-62-5
1,1,2-Trichloroethane79-00-5
Trichloroethylene79-01-6
Triethylamine121-44-8
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene95-63-6
2,2,4-Trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate16938-22-0
2,4,4-Trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate15646-96-5
Vanadium(21)7440-62-2
Vinyl acetate108-05-4
Vinyl chloride75-01-4
Vinylidene chloride75-35-4
Xylene(22)1330-20-7
Zinc(6)*

Part 1B substances
NameCAS number
Mercury(6)*
Cadmium(6)*
Arsenic(6)*
Hexavalent chromium(6)*
Lead(23, 24)*
Tetraethyl lead78-00-2

Part 2 substances
NameCAS number
Acenaphthene83-32-9
Acenaphthylene208-96-8
Benzo(a)anthracene56-55-3
Benzo(a)phenanthrene218-01-9
Benzo(a)pyrene50-32-8
Benzo(b)fluoranthene205-99-2
Benzo(e)pyrene192-97-2
Benzo(g,h,i)perylene191-24-2
Benzo(j)fluoranthene205-82-3
Benzo(k)fluoranthene207-08-9
Dibenz(a,j)acridine224-42-0
Dibenzo(a,e)fluoranthene5385-75-1
Dibenzo(a,e)pyrene192-65-4
Dibenzo(a,h)acridine226-36-8
Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene53-70-3
Dibenzo(a,h)pyrene 189-64-0
Dibenzo(a,i)pyrene 189-55-9
Dibenzo(a,l)pyrene 191-30-0
7H-Dibenzo(c,g)carbazole 194-59-2
7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene  57-97-6
Fluoranthene 206-44-0
Fluorene86-73-7
Indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene 193-39-5
3-Methylcholanthrene 56-49-5
5-Methylchrysene 3697-24-3
1-Nitropyrene 5522-43-0
Perylene 198-55-0
Phenanthrene 85-01-8
Pyrene 129-00-0


* No single CAS number applies to this NPRI listing.

(1) CAS Registry Number denotes the Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number, as appropriate.

(2) “and its salts” – the CAS number corresponds to the weak acid or base. However, the substance includes the salts of these weak acids and bases. When calculating the weight of these substances and their salts, use the molecular weight of the acid or base, not the total weight of the salt.

(3) “fume or dust”

(4) “fibrous forms”

(5) “Ammonia (total)” means the total of both of ammonia (NH3 – CAS No. 7664-41-7) and the ammonium ion (NH4+) in solution.

(6) “an d its compounds”  

(7) “friable form”               

(8) “and its compounds” except hexavalent chromium compounds 

(9) “all isomers” including the individual isomers of cresol:  m-cresol (CAS No. 108-39-4), o-cresol (CAS No. 95-48-7) and p-cresol (CAS No. 106-44-5).     

(10) “ionic”

(11) “mixed isomers”

(12)  “all isomers” including, but not limited to, HCFC-122 (CAS No. 354-21-2).

(13) “all isomers” including, but not limited to, HCFC-123 (CAS No. 306-83-2) and HCFC 123a (CAS No. 90454-18-5).

(14) “all isomers” including, but not limited to, HCFC 124 (CAS No. 2837-89-0), and HCFC 124a (CAS No. 354-25-6).

(15) “in solution at a pH of 6.0 or greater”

(16)  Includes nonylphenol, its ethoxylates and derivatives with CAS numbers:  104-40-5; 25154-52-3; 84852-15-3; 1323-65-5; 26523-78-4; 28987-17-9; 68081-86-7; 68515-89-9; 68515-93-5; 104-35-8; 20427-84-3; 26027-38-3; 27177-05-5; 27177-08-8; 28679-13-2; 27986-36-3; 37251-69-7; 7311-27-5; 9016-45-9; 27176-93-8; 37340-60-6; 51811-79-1; 51938-25-1; 68412-53-3; 9051-57-4; 7205-87-1; 68412-54-4; 127087-87--1.

(17)  Includes octylphenol and its ethoxylates with CAS numbers: 140-66-9; 1806-26-4; 27193-28-8; 68987-90-6; 9002-93-1; 9036-19-5  

(18)  “yellow or white”        

(19)  Does not include phosphorus (yellow or white) with CAS No. 7723-14-0.               

(20)  This class of substances, expressed in terms of hydrogen sulphide, is restricted to the following substances:  hydrogen sulphide (CAS No. 7783-06-4), carbon disulphide (CAS No. 75-15-0), carbonyl sulphide (CAS No. 463-58-1), dimethyl sulphide (CAS No. 75-18-3), dimethyl disulphide (CAS No. 624-92-0), and methyl mercaptan (CAS No. 74-93-1).               

(21)  “(except when in an alloy) and its compounds”

(22)  “all isomers” including the individual isomers of xylene:  m-xylene (CAS No. 108-38-3), o-xylene (CAS No. 95-47-6) and p-xylene (CAS No. 106-42-3).

(23)  “and its compounds” except tetraethyl lead.

(24)  Does not include lead (and its compounds) contained in stainless steel, brass or bronze alloy.

Return to Table of Contents

Appendix 3: 2009 NPRI substances and reporting for tailings and waste rock


Part 1A substances
NameCAS number(1)
Acetaldehyde75-07-0
Acetonitrile75-05-8
Acetophenone98-86-2
Acrolein107-02-8
Acrylamide79-06-1
Acrylic acid(2)79-10-7
Acrylonitrile107-13-1
Alkanes, C6-18, chloro68920-70-7
Alkanes, C10-13, chloro85535-84-8
Allyl alcohol107-18-6
Allyl chloride107-05-1
Aluminum(3)7429-90-5
Aluminum oxide(4)1344-28-1
Ammonia (total) (5)*
Aniline(2)62-53-3
Anthracene120-12-7
Antimony(6)*
Asbestos(7)1332-21-4
Benzene71-43-2
Benzoyl chloride98-88-4
Benzoyl peroxide94-36-0
Benzyl chloride100-44-7
Biphenyl92-52-4
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate103-23-1
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate117-81-7
Boron trifluoride7637-07-2
Bromine7726-95-6
1-Bromo-2-chloroethane107-04-0
Bromomethane74-83-9
1,3-Butadiene106-99-0
2-Butoxyethanol111-76-2
Butyl acrylate141-32-2
i -Butyl alcohol78-83-1
n -Butyl alcohol71-36-3
sec -Butyl alcohol78-92-2
tert -Butyl alcohol75-65-0
Butyl benzyl phthalate85-68-7
1,2-Butylene oxide106-88-7
Butyraldehyde123-72-8
C.I. Acid Green 34680-78-8
C.I. Basic Green 4569-64-2
C.I. Basic Red 1989-38-8
C.I. Direct Blue 21828407-37-6
C.I. Disperse Yellow 32832-40-8
C.I. Food Red 1581-88-9
C.I. Solvent Orange 73118-97-6
C.I. Solvent Yellow 14842-07-9
Calcium cyanide156-62-7
Calcium fluoride7789-75-5
Carbon disulphide75-15-0
Carbon tetrachloride56-23-5
Carbonyl sulphide463-58-1
Catechol120-80-9
CFC-1175-69-4
CFC-1275-71-8
CFC-1375-72-9
CFC-11476-14-2
CFC-11576-15-3
Chlorendic acid115-28-6
Chlorine7782-50-5
Chlorine dioxide10049-04-4
Chloroacetic acid(2)79-11-8
Chlorobenzene108-90-7
Chloroethane75-00-3
Chloroform67-66-3
Chloromethane74-87-3
3-Chloro-2-methyl-1-propene563-47-3
3-Chloropropionitrile542-76-7
Chromium(8)*
Cobalt(6)*
Copper(6)*
Cresol(2, 9)1319-77-3
Crotonaldehyde4170-30-3
Cumene98-82-8
Cumene hydroperoxide80-15-9
Cyanides(10)*
Cyclohexane110-82-7
Cyclohexanol108-93-0
Decabromodiphenyl oxide1163-19-5
2,4-Diaminotoluene (2)95-80-7
2,6-Di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol128-37-0
Dibutyl phthalate84-74-2
o -Dichlorobenzene95-50-1
p -Dichlorobenzene106-46-7
3,3’-Dichlorobenzidine dihydrochloride612-83-9
1,2-Dichloroethane107-06-2
Dichloromethane75-09-2
2,4-Dichlorophenol (2)120-83-2
1,2-Dichloropropane78-87-5
Dicyclopentadiene77-73-6
Diethanolamine(2)111-42-2
Diethyl phthalate84-66-2
Diethyl sulphate64-67-5
Dimethylamine124-40-3
N,N-Dimethylaniline(2)121-69-7
N,N-Dimethylformamide68-12-2
Dimethyl phenol1300-71-6
Dimethyl phthalate131-11-3
Dimethyl sulphate77-78-1
4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol(2)534-52-1
2,4-Dinitrotoluene121-14-2
2,6-Dinitrotoluene606-20-2
Dinitrotoluene(11)25321-14-6
Di-n-octyl phthalate117-84-0
1,4-Dioxane123-91-1
Diphenylamine122-39-4
Epichlorohydrin106-89-8
2-Ethoxyethanol110-80-5
2-Ethoxyethyl acetate111-15-9
Ethyl acrylate140-88-5
Ethylbenzene100-41-4
Ethyl chloroformate541-41-3
Ethylene74-85-1
Ethylene glycol107-21-1
Ethylene oxide75-21-8
Ethylene thiourea96-45-7
Fluorine7782-41-4
Formaldehyde50-00-0
Formic acid64-18-6
Halon 1211353-59-3
Halon 130175-63-8
HCFC-2275-45-6
HCFC-122 and all isomers(12)41834-16-6
HCFC-123 and all isomers(13)34077-87-7
HCFC 124 and all isomers(14)63938-10-3
HCFC-141b1717-00-6
HCFC-142b75-68-3
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene77-47-4
Hexachloroethane67-72-1
Hexachlorophene70-30-4
n -Hexane110-54-3
Hydrazine(2)302-01-2
Hydrochloric acid7647-01-0
Hydrogen cyanide74-90-8
Hydrogen fluoride7664-39-3
Hydrogen sulphide7783-06-4
Hydroquinone(2)123-31-9
Iron pentacarbonyl13463-40-6
Isobutyraldehyde78-84-2
Isophorone diisocyanate4098-71-9
Isoprene78-79-5
Isopropyl alcohol67-63-0
p,p’-Isopropylidenediphenol80-05-7
Isosafrole120-58-1
Lithium carbonate554-13-2
Maleic anhydride108-31-6
Manganese(6)*
2-Mercaptobenzothiazole149-30-4
Methanol67-56-1
2-Methoxyethanol109-86-4
2-Methoxyethyl acetate110-49-6
Methyl acrylate96-33-3
Methyl tert-butyl ether1634-04-4
p,p’-Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline)101-14-4
1,1-Methylenebis (4-isocyanatocyclohexane)5124-30-1
Methylenebis(phenylisocyanate)101-68-8
p,p’-Methylenedianiline101-77-9
Methyl ethyl ketone78-93-3
Methyl iodide74-88-4
Methyl isobutyl ketone108-10-1
Methyl methacrylate80-62-6
N-Methylolacrylamide924-42-5
2-Methylpyridine109-06-8
N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone872-50-4
Michler’s ketone(2)90-94-8
Molybdenum trioxide1313-27-5
Naphthalene91-20-3
Nickel(6)*
Nitrate ion(15)*
Nitric acid7697-37-2
Nitrilotriacetic acid(2)139-13-9
p -Nitroaniline100-01-6
Nitrobenzene98-95-3
Nitroglycerin55-63-0
p-Nitrophenol(2)100-02-7
2-Nitropropane79-46-9
N-Nitrosodiphenylamine86-30-6
Nonylphenol and its ethoxylates(16)*
Octylphenol and its ethoxylates(17)*
Paraldehyde123-63-7
Pentachloroethane76-01-7
Peracetic acid(2)79-21-0
Phenol(2)108-95-2
p-Phenylenediamine(2)106-50-3
o-Phenylphenol(2)90-43-7
Phosgene75-44-5
Phosphorus(18)7723-14-0
Phosphorus (total) (19)*
Phthalic anhydride85-44-9
Polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate9016-87-9
Potassium bromate7758-01-2
Propargyl alcohol107-19-7
Propionaldehyde123-38-6
Propylene115-07-1
Propylene oxide75-56-9
Pyridine(2)110-86-1
Quinoline(2)91-22-5
p-Quinone106-51-4
Safrole94-59-7
Selenium(6)*
Silver(6)*
Sodium fluoride7681-49-4
Sodium nitrite7632-00-0
Styrene100-42-5
Styrene oxide96-09-3
Sulphurhexafluoride2551-62-4
Sulphuric acid7664-93-9
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane630-20-6
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane79-34-5
Tetrachloroethylene127-18-4
Tetracycline hydrochloride64-75-5
Thiourea62-56-6
Thorium dioxide1314-20-1
Titanium tetrachloride7550-45-0
Toluene108-88-3
Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate584-84-9
Toluene-2,6-diisocyanate91-08-7
Total reduced sulphur(20)*
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene120-82-1
Toluenediisocyanate (11)26471-62-5
1,1,2-Trichloroethane79-00-5
Trichloroethylene79-01-6
Triethylamine121-44-8
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene95-63-6
2,2,4-Trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate16938-22-0
2,4,4-Trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate15646-96-5
Vanadium(21)7440-62-2
Vinyl acetate108-05-4
Vinyl chloride75-01-4
Vinylidene chloride75-35-4
Xylene(22)1330-20-7
Zinc(6)*

Part 1B substances
NameCAS number
Mercury(6)*
Cadmium(6)*
Arsenic(6)*
Hexavalent chromium(6)*
Lead(23,24)*
Tetraethyl lead78-00-2

Part 2 substances
NameCAS number
Acenaphthene83-32-9
Acenaphthylene208-96-8
Benzo(a)anthracene56-55-3
Benzo(a)phenanthrene218-01-9
Benzo(a)pyrene50-32-8
Benzo(b)fluoranthene205-99-2
Benzo(e)pyrene192-97-2
Benzo(g,h,i)perylene191-24-2
Benzo(j)fluoranthene205-82-3
Benzo(k)fluoranthene207-08-9
Dibenz(a,j)acridine224-42-0
Dibenzo(a,e)fluoranthene5385-75-1
Dibenzo(a,e)pyrene192-65-4
Dibenzo(a,h)acridine226-36-8
Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene53-70-3
Dibenzo(a,h)pyrene 189-64-0
Dibenzo(a,i)pyrene 189-55-9
Dibenzo(a,l)pyrene 191-30-0
7H-Dibenzo(c,g)carbazole 194-59-2
7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene  57-97-6
Fluoranthene 206-44-0
Fluorene             86-73-7
Indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene 193-39-5
3-Methylcholanthrene 56-49-5
5-Methylchrysene 3697-24-3
1-Nitropyrene 5522-43-0
Perylene 198-55-0
Phenanthrene 85-01-8
Pyrene 129-00-0

Part 3 substances
NameCAS number
Hexachlorobenzene118-74-1
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin1746-01-6
Octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin3268-87-9 
1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin19408-74-3 
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-Heptachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin35822-46-9 
Octachlorodibenzofuran39001-02-0 
1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzo-  p-dioxin39227-28-6 
1,2,3,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin40321-76-4 
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran51207-31-9 
1,2,3,4,7,8,9-Heptachlorodibenzofuran55673-89-7 
2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran57117-31-4 
1,2,3,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran57117-41-6 
1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzofuran57117-44-9 
1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin57653-85-7 
2,3,4,6,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzofuran60851-34-5 
1,2,3,4,6,7,8Heptachlorodibenzofuran67562-39-4 
1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzofuran70648-26-9 
1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachlorodibenzofura72918-21-9 

*   No single CAS number applies to this NPRI listing.

(1) CAS Registry Number denotes the Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number, as appropriate.

(2)  “and its salts” – the CAS number corresponds to the weak acid or base. However, the substance includes the salts of these weak acids and bases. When calculating the weight of these substances and their salts, use the molecular weight of the acid or base, not the total weight of the salt.

(3)  “fume or dust”               

(4)  “fibrous forms”

(5)  “Ammonia (total)” means the total of both of ammonia (NH3 – CAS No. 7664-41-7) and the ammonium ion (NH4+) in solution.

(6)  “an d its compounds”     

(7)  “friable form”  

(8)  “and its compounds” except hexavalent chromium compounds  

(9)  “all isomers” including the individual isomers of cresol:  m-cresol (CAS No. 108-39-4), o-cresol (CAS No. 95-48-7) and p-cresol (CAS No. 106-44-5).        

(10)  “ionic”

(11)  “mixed isomers”

(12)  “all isomers” including, but not limited to, HCFC-122 (CAS No. 354-21-2).

(13)  “all isomers” including, but not limited to, HCFC-123 (CAS No. 306-83-2) and HCFC 123a (CAS No. 90454-18-5).

(14)  “all isomers” including, but not limited to, HCFC 124 (CAS No. 2837-89-0), and HCFC 124a (CAS No. 354-25-6).

(15)  “in solution at a pH of 6.0 or greater”

(16)  Includes nonylphenol, its ethoxylates and derivatives with CAS numbers:  104-40-5; 25154-52-3; 84852-15-3; 1323-65-5; 26523-78-4; 28987-17-9; 68081-86-7; 68515-89-9; 68515-93-5; 104-35-8; 20427-84-3; 26027-38-3; 27177-05-5; 27177-08-8; 28679-13-2; 27986-36-3; 37251-69-7; 7311-27-5; 9016-45-9; 27176-93-8; 37340-60-6; 51811-79-1; 51938-25-1; 68412-53-3; 9051-57-4; 7205-87-1; 68412-54-4; 127087-87--1.

(17)  Includes octylphenol and its ethoxylates with CAS numbers: 140-66-9; 1806-26-4; 27193-28-8; 68987-90-6; 9002-93-1; 9036-19-5 

(18)  “yellow or white”           

(19)  Does not include phosphorus (yellow or white) with CAS No. 7723-14-0.  

(20)  This class of substances, expressed in terms of hydrogen sulphide, is restricted to the following substances:  hydrogen sulphide (CAS No. 7783-06-4), carbon disulphide (CAS No. 75-15-0), carbonyl sulphide (CAS No. 463-58-1), dimethyl sulphide (CAS No. 75-18-3), dimethyl disulphide (CAS No. 624-92-0), and methyl mercaptan (CAS No. 74-93-1).  

(21)  “(except when in an alloy) and its compounds”

(22)  “all isomers” including the individual isomers of xylene:  m-xylene (CAS No. 108-38-3), o-xylene (CAS No. 95-47-6) and p-xylene (CAS No. 106-42-3).

(23)  “and its compounds” except tetraethyl lead.

(24)  Does not include lead (and its compounds) contained in stainless steel, brass or bronze alloy.

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Appendix 4: Step-by-step guide for reporting tailings and waste rock to the NPRI

This Guide is designed to provide a step-by-step approach to reporting to the NPRI for tailings and waste rock. The more complete guide provides more detailed explanations of the reporting requirements. The NPRI Canada Gazette notices provide the legal basis for reporting.

Read this early and plan your work. Some sampling and measurements may be required for reporting. Planning ahead is essential. Any sampling and measurements required will be specified for all years from 2006 to 2009.

Start with the report for 2009, and then estimate releases for the previous years.

For waste rock

  1. Determine if waste rock was generated in 2009 (and from 2006 to 2008).
  2. If so, does some or all of the waste rock meet the criteria for exclusions?
    • a. Is all the waste rock considered inert in your permit?
    • b. Is the concentration of arsenic below 12 mg/kg and
    • c. Is the sulphur below 0.2% by weight? and if not
    • d. Is the ratio of neutralizing to acidifying potential greater than 3:1?

      *See guide section 3.4 for more details on exclusions.

  3. For waste rock that is not excluded, include the quantity of NPRI substances in the waste rock for the threshold calculation.

For tailings

  1. Determine if tailings were generated in 2009 (and from 2006 to 2008).
  2. Sand in tailings should not be considered in the calculation of thresholds. This applies to oil sand mining and in-situ production, as well as other mining processes that produce sand.

    *See section 3.4 Stable/Inert Constituents of tailings

  3. For threshold calculations include the quantity of NPRI substances that are found in tailings. 

    *See Table 1 for a list of NPRI substances that are relevant to the different mining sectors.

  4. Do your reporting threshold calculation while including the NPRI substances that are found in tailings and waste rock as outlined above.
  5. Report releases, disposals and transfers off site for recycling for those substances that exceed the reporting threshold.

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