National Pollutant Release Inventory Substance Review

Proposed Deletions for 2016

Environment and Climate Change Canada proposed to delete 21 substances from the NPRI substance list starting in 2016. Consultations on this proposed change were conducted with the NPRI Multi-Stakeholder Work Group (WG) from October 30, 2014 to January 12, 2015. After considering the comments received, Environment and Climate Change Canada has decided to proceed with the deletions, as reflected in the 2016-2017 NPRI Canada Gazette notice.


Consultation Document

The following is a summary of the proposal. To obtain a copy of the proposal, please contact the NPRI.


Summary

In order to continually improve the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) and meet both departmental priorities and data user needs, Environment and Climate Change Canada has been conducting a review of the NPRI substance list. This review involves verifying that the NPRI substance list is complete and relevant, and that reporting thresholds are appropriate for gathering data on pollutant releases in Canada.

Based on the analyses conducted as part of this substance review, Environment and Climate Change Canada is proposing to delete 21 substances that are currently listed in Part 1A of the NPRI substance list (with 10 tonne mass and 1% concentration thresholds). These substances are proposed for deletion starting with the 2016 reporting year. The substances fall into two groups:

  1. Four substances that are manufactured, processed or otherwise used (MPO) in Canada, but are not of health or environmental concern in Canada, and are not released in significant quantities by facilities in Canada. These substances meet NPRI decision factor 1.1, but do not meet decision factors 1.2, 1.3, and 2. For more information on the factors that are considered when modifying the NPRI, see A Guide to the Procedures to Follow When Submitting Proposals and A Description of the NPRI Stakeholder Consultation Process.
    Table 1. Substances proposed to be deleted from the NPRI that are manufactured, processed or otherwise used in Canada
    Substance NameChemical Abstracts Services Registry Number (CAS RN)
    C.I. Basic Red 1989-38-8
    C.I. Food Red 1581-88-9
    Dimethyl phenol1300-71-6
    Tetracycline hydrochloride64-75-5

     

  2. Seventeen substances that are not MPO in Canada, are not of health or environmental concern in Canada, and which are not released in significant quantities by facilities in Canada. These substances do not meet decision factors 1.1-1.3 and 2.
  3. Table 2. Substances proposed to be deleted from the NPRI that are not manufactured, processed or otherwise used in Canada
    Substance NameChemical Abstracts Services Registry Number (CAS RN)
    C.I. Acid Green 34680-78-8
    C.I. Direct Blue 21828407-37-6
    Calcium cyanamide156-62-7
    Chlorendic acid115-28-6
    2,6-Dinitrotoluene606-20-2
    Dinitrotoluene (mixed isomers)25321-14-6
    Hexachloroethane67-72-1
    Isosafrole120-58-1
    p-Nitrophenol (and its salts)100-02-7
    Paraldehyde123-63-7
    Pentachloroethane76-01-7
    o-Phenylphenol (and its salts)90-43-7
    Propargyl alcohol107-19-7
    p-Quinone106-51-4
    Safrole94-59-7
    Styrene oxide96-09-3
    Vinylidene chloride75-35-4

Note that while these substances do not currently meet the decision factors to be retained on the NPRI substance list, Environment and Climate Change Canada will continue to assess any new information on these and all NPRI substances, as it becomes available. Should information indicate in the future that a substance removed from the NPRI does meet the decision factors, re-addition to the NPRI can be considered at that time.


Summary of Stakeholder Comments and Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Response

The National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) Multi-Stakeholder Work Group provided input on Environment and Climate Change Canada’s proposal to delete 21 NPRI substances.

After considering the comments received, which were supportive of the Substance Review process and of the deletions, Environment and Climate Change Canada has decided to proceed with the deletion of these 21 substances.

Comments were received from the following stakeholders:

  • Canadian Steel Producers Association
  • Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association

Support for the process and change is acknowledged. A response from Environment and Climate Change Canada to these stakeholder comments is not required.

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