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2015 Summary Report: Reviewed Facility-Reported Data

7. Data on Disposals and Transfers


This section provides a breakdown of the quantities of substances disposed of or transferred, as reported to the NPRI, the main substances reported in these categories, the sector breakdown, and the changes over time since 2006.

Reported data discussed in this section is divided into two categories: disposals and transfers, which are further divided into sub-categories, as defined below:

  • On-site disposals – a substance can be permanently disposed of by various methods, including landfilling, underground injection or land application. This is termed on-site disposal if it takes place on the site of the reporting facility.
  • Off-site disposals – when the disposal takes place outside the site, this is termed “off-site” disposal. These transfers can take place within Canada or outside the country. The methods used are the same as for on-site disposals.
  • Off-site transfer for treatment prior to disposal – also called “treatment prior to disposal” or “treatment” – this category indicates that a substance may have been altered physically, chemically, biologically, by incineration, or by treatment in a municipal treatment plant before being disposed of off- site.
  • Tailings are waste material that remains after the processing of ore, ore concentrate or other mined materials (e.g. oil sands) to extract marketable components such as metals, minerals, or bitumen. Depending on the type of process used and the material being recovered, tailings could include finely ground rock material, sand, clay, water, chemicals used in the process, and residual metals, minerals, and bitumen.
  • Waste rock is rock removed during mining operations to provide access to the ore and that is not further processed at that time. Waste rock generally consists of fragmented pieces of rock of various sizes.
  • Off-site transfers for recycling – also called “off-site recycling” or “recycling” – are associated with activities that keep a material or component of the material from becoming a waste destined for final disposal. Facilities that meet the NPRI reporting thresholds submit information on the quantities of substances that they transfer off-site for recycling. On-site recycling activities do not have to be reported.

The quantities of substances disposed of or transferred reported to the NPRI accounted for 32% of the quantities reported to the NPRI in 2015, or 1,563,374 tonnes. The breakdown of this total by category is shown in Figure 7-1.

Figure 7-1 Breakdown of total disposals and total transfers reported to the NPRI in 2015

Pie chart showing the breakdown of total disposals and total transfers reported to the NPRI in 2015

Long Description

 

CategoryReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
On-site disposals269,57217%
Off-site disposals98,6806%
Tailings738,02247%
Waste rock79,6475%
Treatment prior to disposal38,0413%
Off-site recycling339,41222%
Total reported disposals and transfers1,563,374100%

As shown in Figure 7-1, the majority of the quantities reported to the NPRI as disposed of or transferred in 2015 come from the management of tailings, which make up 47% (738,022 tonnes) of total disposals and transfers.

Figure 7-2 shows how this breakdown has changed over the last ten years since 2006.

Figure 7-2 Changes over time of total quantities reported to the NPRI between 2006 and 2015

Stack area graph showing changes over time of total disposals and total transfers by medium since 2006 relative to the number of facilities

Long Description

 

YearOn-site disposals (tonnes)Off-site disposals (tonnes)Tailings (tonnes)Waste rock (tonnes)Treatment prior to disposal (tonnes)Off-site transfers for recycling (tonnes)Number of NPRI reporting facilities
2006337,720366,841537,9253,68039,153378,8379,125
2007366,611404,964486,7354,59833,740402,0058,943
2008274,698534,258554,7939,98152,586342,4438,843
2009267,439512,166520,24811,99246,619344,0018,529
2010249,659546,064615,71617,43350,679389,3658,151
2011284,820342,092580,22021,57640,651458,4677,947
2012242,678307,016648,72335,38240,269346,1407,791
2013239,162118,965692,769125,42638,480302,2137,851
2014273,53197,448672,229102,24744,879306,0697,849
2015269,57298,680738,02279,64738,041339,4127,284

Between 2014 and 2015, total reported disposals and transfers increased 4% (66,972 tonnes). Tailings from the mining and quarrying sector, and off-site transfers for recycling from defence services contributed the most to this increase. This variation is slightly offset by substances reported for treatment prior to disposal and for waste rock, which decreased 15% (6,839 tonnes) and 22% (22,599 tonnes) respectively, in 2015 compared to 2014.

Between 2006 and 2015, total disposals and transfers decreased 6% (100,782 tonnes). Reported quantities for several disposal and transfer categories have decreased, particularly from off-site disposals [73% (268,161 tonnes)], on-site disposals [20% (68,148 tonnes)], and off-site transfers for recycling [10% (39,425 tonnes)]. On the other hand, since the addition of these categories to the NPRI in 2006, tailings and waste rock quantities have increased 37% (200,097 tonnes) and 2,064% (75,967 tonnes) respectively.

In Table 7-1, reported disposals and transfers and the number of reporting facilities for these categories are broken down by sectors. The sectors contributing the most to the quantities of NPRI substances disposed of or transferred were the mining and quarrying, manufacturing, and oil and gas extraction sectors.

Table 7-1 Sectoral breakdown of disposals and transfers in 2015
SectorReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage of reported quantitiesNumber of facilitiesPercentage of facilities
Electricity5,676<1%422%
Manufacturing381,35024%1,15062%
Mining and quarrying758,32149%905%
Oil and gas extraction246,96116%1307%
Other sectors171,06611%43223%
Total1,563,374100%1,844100%

Figure 7-3 indicates their location across Canada. The largest facilities on the map are mostly metal mining facilities and reported mostly tailings: one is an iron ore mine located near the Newfoundland & Labrador and Quebec border, another one is a gold and silver ore mine located near the Ontario and Quebec border. An oil and gas extraction facility in Alberta is also visible due to underground injection of large quantities of hydrogen sulphide. Four manufacturing facilities also have large points on the map: two are petroleum refineries in New Brunswick and in southern Ontario, one is a non-ferrous metal producer and processing facility in British Columbia, and one is a spent pot lining treatment facility in Quebec.

Figure 7-3 Map of facilities that reported disposals and transfers for 2015, by sector and total quantities reported

Map of Canada showing location of facilities reporting disposals and transfers in 2015, by sector, and total reported quantitiestotal quantities reported

Long Description
Electricity:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 3,000 tonnes3,000 –  15,000 tonnes15,000 – 30,000 tonnes30,000 – 60,000 tonnesOver 60,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta10000010
Ontario10000010
Quebec200002
British Columbia600006
Saskatchewan300003
Manitoba300003
Nova Scotia500005
New Brunswick200002
Newfoundland & Labrador100001
Northwest Territories000000
Nunavut000000
Prince Edward Island000000
Yukon000000

 

Manufacturing:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 3,000 tonnes3,000 –  15,000 tonnes15,000 – 30,000 tonnes30,000 – 60,000 tonnesOver 60,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta90100091
Ontario6426010649
Quebec2355110242
British Columbia78101080
Saskatchewan16000016
Manitoba38000038
Nova Scotia16000016
New Brunswick13001014
Newfoundland & Labrador200002
Northwest Territories000000
Nunavut000000
Prince Edward Island200002
Yukon000000

 

Mining and quarrying:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 3,000 tonnes3,000 –  15,000 tonnes15,000 – 30,000 tonnes30,000 – 60,000 tonnesOver 60,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta400004
Ontario18601126
Quebec10331017
British Columbia4323012
Saskatchewan14000014
Manitoba230005
Nova Scotia000000
New Brunswick110002
Newfoundland & Labrador120014
Northwest Territories130004
Nunavut010001
Prince Edward Island000000
Yukon100001

 

Oil and gas extraction:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 3,000 tonnes3,000 –  15,000 tonnes15,000 – 30,000 tonnes30,000 – 60,000 tonnesOver 60,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta87921099
Ontario000000
Quebec000000
British Columbia12120015
Saskatchewan11000011
Manitoba000000
Nova Scotia300003
New Brunswick000000
Newfoundland & Labrador100001
Northwest Territories100001
Nunavut000000
Prince Edward Island000000
Yukon000000

 

Other sectors:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 3,000 tonnes3,000 –  15,000 tonnes15,000 – 30,000 tonnes30,000 – 60,000 tonnesOver 60,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta1004100105
Ontario1307000137
Quebec64300067
British Columbia52000052
Saskatchewan21000021
Manitoba17000017
Nova Scotia10000010
New Brunswick11000011
Newfoundland & Labrador700007
Northwest Territories100001
Nunavut000000
Prince Edward Island300003
Yukon100001

Source: National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) data for 2015

7.1. On-Site and Off-Site Disposals, and Treatment prior to Disposal 


This section discusses off-site transfers for treatment prior to disposal as well as on-site and off‑site disposals reported in 2015. Tailings and waste rock are not included in section 7.1 and will be discussed in section 7.2.

On-site disposals, off-site disposals, and off-site transfers for treatment prior to disposal accounted for close to 26% (406,293 tonnes) of the total disposals and transfers reported to the NPRI in 2015.

Figure 7-4 shows that the majority of disposals are on-site disposals, mostly underground injection with 40% (162,778 tonnes) and landfilling with 25% (100,480 tonnes) of total reported disposals, excluding tailings and waste rock. The main disposal methods for off-site disposals are similar, with underground injection at 12% (48,872 tonnes) and landfill at 9% (38,307 tonnes) of total reported disposals in this section. In the case of off-site transfers for treatment prior to final disposal, treatment by incineration or thermal process is the most commonly used treatment method with over 3% (13,618 tonnes), followed by transfers to municipal wastewater treatment plants, with close to 3% of total disposals (10,419 tonnes), excluding tailings and waste rock.

Figure 7-4 Breakdown of types of disposals reported to the NPRI in 2015, excluding tailings and waste rock management

Pie chart showing the breakdown of disposal and transfer quantities reported in 2015, excluding tailings and waste rock

Long Description
On-site disposal:
CategoryReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage of total reported quantities
Land application6,3142%
Landfill100,48025%
Underground injection162,77840%
Total reported on-site disposals269,57266%

 

Off-site disposal:
CategoryReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage of total reported quantities
Land application8,7932%
Landfill38,3079%
Storage2,7081%
Underground injection48,87212%
Total reported off-site disposals98,68024%

 

Treatment prior to disposal:
CategoryReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage of total reported quantities
Biological1,413<1%
Chemical5,9061%
Incineration or thermal process10,4193%
Municipal sewage treatment plants13,6183%
Physical6,6842%
Total reported treatment prior to disposal38,0419%

Total reported quantities: 406,293 tonnes 

In 2015, the following sectors reported over 40,000 tonnes of disposals (excluding tailings and waste rock) respectively:

  • Conventional oil and gas extraction (oil and gas extraction);
  • Waste treatment and disposal (others), and
  • All other non-metallic mineral product manufacturing (manufacturing).

Figure 7-5 Changes over time of disposals excluding tailings and waste rock reported to the NPRI between 2006 and 2015

Stacked bar diagram showing the quantities of the main disposal substances excluding tailings and waste rock since 2006

Long Description
YearHydrogen sulphide (tonnes)Other substances (tonnes)Zinc (and its compounds) (tonnes)Asbestos (friable form) (tonnes)Methanol (tonnes)Calcium fluoride (tonnes)Ammonia (total) (tonnes)Phosphorus (total)(tonnes)Manganese (and its compounds) (tonnes)
2006565,51666,06926,55714,15819,6655,49517,55816,17412,521
2007604,46481,91021,77717,10319,2282,98925,31220,27912,253
2008672,67367,01426,00926,40823,2434,44914,10516,73410,907
2009639,78781,72519,49623,70020,9173,69511,91517,1347,855
2010613,67579,89121,69236,49421,76729,90815,26817,10210,604
2011412,24083,37042,15927,93125,40032,61615,52817,48610,835
2012335,73769,37235,10428,05122,70242,68923,00416,72616,579
2013150,58464,53124,77933,34328,26444,13521,74517,20312,021
2014164,70573,88724,60634,13721,79947,14919,68216,55613,337
2015165,15360,23723,92723,30737,52346,75817,72818,75012,910

As shown in Figure 7-5, the substances disposed of on and off-site and treated in larger quantities in 2015 (excluding tailings and waste rock) are similar to those reported in 2014. Hydrogen sulphide is reported primarily by the oil and gas extraction sector since it occurs in natural gas.

Between 2014 and 2015, total disposals (excluding tailings and waste rock) decreased 2% (9,565 tonnes). The reason for this decrease is due to the decrease in asbestos (friable form) reported for landfilling by waste treatment and disposal facilities. For most of these facilities, disposals of asbestos vary from year to year, based on the quantities brought to the landfill by outside sources. Another waste treatment and disposal facility in Alberta which had large quantities of asbestos in 2014 (5,076 tonnes) did not have this substance disposed at its site in 2015. On the other hand, an increase in reported quantities of methanol for underground injection offset the overall decrease of total disposals (excluding tailings and waste rock): six facilities in Alberta undertaking services to oil and gas extraction indicated changes in production levels and in on-site treatment to explain this variation.

Between 2006 and 2009, an oil facility in British Columbia contributed to a slow but steady increase in disposals reported to the NPRI, due primarily to off-site transfers. From 2010 until it closed in late 2012, it contributed significantly to a decrease in underground injection of hydrogen sulphide.

 

7.2. Disposal of Tailings and Waste Rock 


Disposal of tailings and waste rock accounted for 52% (817,670 tonnes) of total disposals and transfers reported to the NPRI in 2015, with approximately 738,022 tonnes of tailings and 79,647 tonnes of waste rock. Close to 93% of these reported quantities originate from the mining sector.

Generally speaking, NPRI substances contained in tailings and waste rock occur naturally, typically at low concentrations, in rock or bitumen deposits extracted during mining operations. However, the overall quantities can be high due to the volume of material extracted or processed. Although tailings and waste rock in Canada are managed with a view to reducing the risk of environmental contamination, acid drainage, potential leaks from tailings ponds, and the possibility of wildlife coming in contact with tailings are sources of concern.

Figure 7-6 Changes over time of tailings and waste rock reported to the NPRI between 2006 and 2015

Stacked bar diagram showing the main tailings and waste rock substances and their quantities since 2006

Long Description
YearManganese (and its compounds) (tonnes)Phosphorus (total) (tonnes)Copper (and its compounds) (tonnes)Zinc (and its compounds) (tonnes)Nickel (and its compounds) (tonnes)Other substances (tonnes)
2006190,93879,63054,25362,39753,184101,203
2007174,51079,38251,02951,54754,01380,853
2008207,09781,23562,85065,25754,51193,825
2009191,25797,27258,68756,80438,65289,567
2010246,05295,68061,67554,09338,304137,345
2011231,323102,88753,46874,03444,43695,647
2012263,970143,32768,32355,58845,702107,196
2013346,953163,27894,75152,69052,349108,174
2014314,981172,11294,35738,69253,357100,977
2015349,959176,45286,67244,42951,034109,126

As shown in Figure 7-6, phosphorus, along with many metals and metal compounds such as manganese, copper, nickel and zinc were among the substances reported in larger quantities in tailings and waste rock in 2015. These substances have traditionally made up the tailings and waste rock category in the NPRI since they started being reported for the 2006 reporting year.

Between 2014 and 2015, tailings and waste rock have increased 6% (43,194 tonnes). Six mining facilities reported increases of over 8,000 tonnes for tailings and waste rock in 2015 compared to 2014. There were various reasons to explain this increase:

  • Two facilities in Newfoundland & Labrador and in Quebec had higher quantities of tailings or ore concentrations;
  • One facility in Quebec indicated an increase in production levels in 2015;
  • One facility in British Columbia had a broader set of assay data to characterize tailings composites,
  • One facility in New Brunswick restarted operations after its shutdown in 2008;
  • One facility in British Columbia indicated that the tailings facility started operating in 2014 and that production levels increased in 2015.

The increase was offset by large decreases of reported quantities for tailings and waste rock from three mining facilities:

  • One facility in British Columbia restarted operations in August 2015 after the temporary suspension of operations following the breach of its tailings storage facility in August 2014, and therefore production lasted for only five months;
  • One facility in British Columbia is currently placed on care and maintenance due to weakness in molybdenum price since July 2015;
  • One facility in Quebec was not in operation due to weakness in iron price in 2015.

Between 2006 and 2015, reported amounts of tailings and waste rock reporting increased by 51% (276,064 tonnes). This change can be attributed to various factors: a facility in Newfoundland & Labrador has driven most of the trend with reported quantities of 98,832 tonnes or more since 2006; there were new large reporters of tailings and waste rock, such as a gold and silver ore mining facility in Ontario in 2013, and a copper-zinc ore mining facility in British Columbia in 2014.

 

7.3. Off-Site Transfers for Recycling


Off-site transfers for recycling accounted for close to 22% (339,412 tonnes) of total disposals and transfers reported to the NPRI in 2015. Figure 7-7 shows the types of off-site recycling, and the quantities reported by the facilities in 2015.

Figure 7-7 Breakdown of recycling categories reported to the NPRI in 2015

Pie chart showing the breakdown of recycling quantities reported in 2015

Long Description
CategoryReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
Recovery of acids or bases132,63539%
Recovery of pollution abatement residues880<1%
Recovery of catalysts5,3892%
Energy recovery8,6003%
Recovery of inorganic materials (not metals)4,2901%
Recovery of metals and metal compounds138,83941%
Recovery of organic substances (not solvents)29,1869%
Other7,8612%
Recovery of solvents6,6012%
Refining or re-use of used oil5,1282%
Total reported recycling339,412100%

The most commonly used recycling category for off-site transfers in 2015 were the recovery of acids and bases and the recovery of metals and metal compounds. In 2015, the following sectors reported over 10,000 tonnes of substances for off-site transfers for recycling:

  • Manufacturing: petroleum refineries; non-ferrous metal (except copper and aluminum) rolling, drawing, extruding and alloying; iron and steel mills and ferro-alloy manufacturing.
  • Oil and gas extraction: non-conventional oil extraction.
  • Other: defence services; petroleum and petroleum products merchant wholesalers; waste treatment and disposal.

Figure 7-8 Changes over time of transfers for off-site recycling reported to the NPRI between 2006 and 2015

Stacked bar diagram showing the main recycling substances and their quantities since 2006

Long Description
YearSulphuric acid (tonnes)Zinc (and its compounds) (tonnes)Lead (and its compounds) (tonnes)Copper (and its compounds) (tonnes)Manganese (and its compounds) (tonnes)Chromium (and its compounds) (tonnes)Xylene (all isomers) (tonnes)Toluene (tonnes)Other substances (tonnes)
2006141,52447,19746,48039,48018,90711,29516,5607,29550,098
2007163,59949,88647,14641,65624,55615,5516,8055,22747,578
2008117,65242,69749,86040,94721,33413,7796,0494,07546,050
2009108,79436,80742,35941,10115,8848,5764,1653,51782,798
2010117,42893,55344,46365,47715,1987,3764,5183,31438,038
2011148,648113,72340,68268,26020,60310,9416,8619,73639,013
2012139,07651,19629,19321,65331,95310,2388,2248,69145,915
2013133,21823,51138,63218,12923,2194,5508,9199,13542,899
2014126,98227,15540,61420,19420,6733,9809,0348,92048,516
2015134,64921,37439,30347,15817,7835,15010,25211,82451,919

Sulphuric acid is the most commonly recovered acid, while lead, zinc, manganese and copper (and their compounds) are among the most recycled metals. Over the past decade, these were the substances most reported as being transferred off-site for recycling.

Between 2014 and 2015, off-site transfers for recycling increased 11% (33,343 tonnes). Copper and sulphuric acid had the largest increase of all substances reported for off-site recycling. The increase in transfers for recycling of sulphuric acid is primarily due to two facilities:

  • A petroleum refinery in Ontario reported 35,243 tonnes of sulphuric acid transferred off-site for recycling in 2015, which is 5,972 tonnes more than in 2014 – this difference is attributed to operational variability (reported quantities have always oscillated between 24,430 and 35,559 tonnes);
  • A manufacturing facility in Quebec had stopped its activities in 2014 and did not report transfers for recycling in that year. This facility resumed operations at the start of 2015.

The quantities reported to the NPRI for off-site transfers for recycling decreased 10% (39,425 tonnes) between 2006 and 2015. Most of the decrease is attributed to the transportation equipment manufacturing sector, which reported lower quantities of zinc and its compounds between 2006 and 2015. Reduction in production levels due to a reduced demand in manufactured products, a reduced amount of generated scrap metal, a change in steel reformulation, and several cases where facilities did not meet the reporting requirements for zinc and its compounds, led to the decrease in reported quantities of this metal. In 2010 and 2011, a mining/metal smelter and refinery in Ontario, reported large quantities of zinc transferred off-site for recycling, following the closure of its operations in May 2010.

 

7.4. Disposals and Transfers of Toxic Substances Reported to the NPRI


The list of reportable NPRI substances contains approximately 100 substances that are toxic under CEPA (1999). These substances are indicated by an asterisk in the table in section 10 (Appendix – Breakdown of 2015 NPRI Facility Reported Data by Substance, and by Substance Category). For the sake of simplicity, they will be referred to as “toxic substances” in this section.

Figure 7-9 shows that toxic substances accounted for 23% (364,810 tonnes) of disposals and transfers reported to the NPRI in 2015. Compared to 2014, reported quantities of toxic substances increased by 2% (6,736 tonnes). Compared to 2006, reported quantities of toxic substances increased by 29% (82,790 tonnes). A large portion of the increase is attributed to on-site disposals of calcium fluoride from a spent pot lining treatment facility which started operations in 2008: calcium fluoride is a compound of spent pot lining, a waste material generated in the aluminum manufacturing sector.

Figure 7-9 Breakdown and changes over time of disposals and transfers of toxic substances and non-toxic substances reportable to the NPRI between 2006 and 2015

Stacked bar diagram showing the breakdown of disposals and transfers of toxic substances since 2006substances and non-toxic substances reportable to the NPRI between 2006 and 2015

Long Description
YearToxic substances [under CEPA (1999)] - On-site and off-site disposals, and transfers for treatmentToxic substances [under CEPA (1999)] - Tailings and waste rockToxic substances [under CEPA (1999)] - Transfers for off-site recyclingNon-toxic substances - On-site and off-site disposals, and transfers for treatmentNon-toxic substances - Tailings and waste rockNon-toxic substances - Transfers for off-site recycling
200680,078108,81793,125663,636432,789285,711
200788,822111,35081,814716,493379,984320,191
200889,889115,71682,360771,653449,059260,083
200994,14394,078117,414732,080438,162226,587
2010132,98097,28379,038713,422535,866310,327
2011141,043109,40180,435526,521492,395378,032
2012147,282115,50973,796442,682568,596272,344
2013155,661120,07480,059240,946698,121222,154
2014156,985117,30583,784258,873657,171222,284
2015153,598121,10590,107252,695696,565249,305

Unlike direct releases to the environment, where most of the reported quantities were toxic substances, disposals and transfers reported to the NPRI consist primarily of non-toxic substances. It should be noted that CACs, which make up a large portion of direct releases of toxic substances, cannot be reported in the disposals and transfers category.

The types of toxic substances reported in larger quantities depend on the category. For disposals and transfers for treatment (excluding tailings and waste rock), large quantities of calcium fluoride (inorganic fluorides), methanol (volatile organic compounds) and asbestos were reported. Tailings and waste rock are primarily composed of toxic metals like nickel, vanadium, arsenic, lead, and their compounds. Substances transferred for off-site recycling include lead, toluene and xylene (BTEX grouping), and methanol (volatile organic compounds).

For the 2015 reporting year, most disposals and transfers of toxic substances were reported to the NPRI by the manufacturing sector, as shown in Figure 7-10. This sector had the largest reported disposals and transfers of dioxins and furans, hexachlorobenzene, inorganic fluorides, ammonia (nutrient), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols, and phthalates. The manufacturing sector is large and covers different industries, which report for different substances according to their activities. Wood products reported the most disposals and transfers for dioxins and furans, chemical manufacturers reported the most for hexachlorobenzene and PAHs, a spent pot lining treatment facility reported the most for inorganic fluorides, and plastics and rubber manufacturers reported the most for phthalates. Facilities from the iron and steel sector, the petroleum and coal refining and manufacturing sector, and the chemicals sector reported the most for ammonia.

The “Other” sector category, which is mostly made up of facilities in the waste treatment and disposal sector, reported large quantities of aldehydes, BTEX, diisocyanates, and ozone-depleting substances. Recycling of BTEX was also largely reported by petroleum and petroleum products merchant wholesalers.

Toxic metals were mostly reported by the mining and quarrying sector under the tailings and waste rock category. Toxic metals include arsenic, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, mercury, nickel, vanadium (except when in an alloy) and their compounds.

Figure 7-10 Sectoral and substance group breakdown of toxic substances disposals and transfers for 2015

Stacked bar diagram showing the breakdown of disposals and transfers by industry sector for certain toxic substance groupings in 2015

Long Description
Aldehydes:
SectorReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
Electricity00%
Manufacturing3828%
Mining and Quarrying00%
Oil and gas extraction3.22%
Other sectors9570%

 

BTEX:
SectorReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
Electricity00%
Manufacturing5,48817%
Mining and Quarrying00%
Oil and gas extraction7,09722%
Other sectors20,13062%

 

CEPA toxic metals:
SectorReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
Electricity1,5821%
Manufacturing49,21129%
Mining and Quarrying105,68262%
Oil and gas extraction7,0334%
Other sectors6,7174%

 

Dioxins and Furans:
SectorReported quantities (g TEQ)Percentage
Electricity0.07<1%
Manufacturing16799%
Mining and Quarrying0.033<1%
Oil and gas extraction00%
Other sectors0.596<1%

 

Diisocyanates:
SectorReported quantities (kg)Percentage
Electricity00%
Manufacturing91137%
Mining and Quarrying00%
Oil and gas extraction00%
Other sectors1,57263%

 

Hexachlorobenzene:
SectorReported quantities (grams)Percentage
Electricity0.080<1%
Manufacturing17,077100%
Mining and Quarrying00%
Oil and gas extraction00%
Other sectors00%

 

Inorganic fluorides:
SectorReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
Electricity00%
Manufacturing49,97099%
Mining and Quarrying00%
Oil and gas extraction00%
Other sectors2751%

Figure 7-10 Sectoral and substance group breakdown of toxic substances disposals and transfers for 2015(continued)

Stacked bar diagram showing the breakdown of disposals and transfers by industry sector for certain toxic substance grouping in 2015 (continued)

Long Description
Nutrients:
SectorReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
Electricity00%
Manufacturing10,06143%
Mining and Quarrying2,1689%
Oil and gas extraction2,93713%
Other sectors8,31635%

 

Ozone-depleting substances:
SectorReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
Electricity00%
Manufacturing0.0882%
Mining and Quarrying00%
Oil and gas extraction00%
Other sectors5.798%

 

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons:
SectorReported quantities (kg)Percentage
Electricity00%
Manufacturing861,42453%
Mining and Quarrying1,044<1%
Oil and gas extraction260,98216%
Other sectors512,01931%

 

Phenols:
SectorReported quantities (kg)Percentage
Electricity00%
Manufacturing27,95192%
Mining and Quarrying00%
Oil and gas extraction00%
Other sectors2,3998%

 

Phthalates:
SectorReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
Electricity00%
Manufacturing71100%
Mining and Quarrying00%
Oil and gas extraction00%
Other sectors00%

 

Others:
SectorReported quantities (tonnes)Percentage
Electricity184<1%
Manufacturing7,5319%
Mining and Quarrying77<1%
Oil and gas extraction21,66825%
Other sectors56,80166%

Figure 7-11 indicates the location of facilities of toxic substances across Canada. The three largest facilities with over 16,000 tonnes of disposals and transfers of toxic substances were from the manufacturing and the mining sectors: the two manufacturing facilities are a spent pot lining facility in Quebec and a non-ferrous metal processor in British Columbia, whereas the third one from the mining sector is a nickel-copper ore mine in Ontario.

Figure 7-11 Map of facilities that reported disposals and transfers of toxic substances for 2015, by sector and total quantities reported

Map of Canada showing location of facilities reporting disposals and transfers of toxic substances in 2015, by sector and total reported quantities of these releases Map of Canada showing location of facilities reporting disposals and transfers of toxic substances in 2015, by sector and total reported quantities of these releases

Long Description
Electricity:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 500 tonnes500 – 2,000 tonnes2,000 – 4,000 tonnes4,000 – 16,000 tonnesOver 16,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta900009
Ontario900009
Quebec100001
British Columbia600006
Saskatchewan300003
Manitoba100001
Nova Scotia500005
New Brunswick200002
Newfoundland & Labrador100001
Northwest Territories000000
Nunavut000000
Prince Edward Island000000
Yukon000000

 

Manufacturing:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 500 tonnes500 – 2,000 tonnes2,000 – 4,000 tonnes4,000 – 16,000 tonnesOver 16,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta69500074
Ontario3965100402
Quebec1524001157
British Columbia58000159
Saskatchewan10000010
Manitoba29000029
Nova Scotia10000010
New Brunswick9100010
Newfoundland & Labrador100001
Northwest Territories000000
Nunavut000000
Prince Edward Island200002
Yukon000000

 

Mining and quarrying:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 500 tonnes500 – 2,000 tonnes2,000 – 4,000 tonnes4,000 – 16,000 tonnesOver 16,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta400004
Ontario17521126
Quebec11041016
British Columbia7230012
Saskatchewan10200012
Manitoba221005
Nova Scotia000000
New Brunswick101002
Newfoundland & Labrador300104
Northwest Territories112004
Nunavut000101
Prince Edward Island000000
Yukon000000

 

Oil and gas extraction:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 500 tonnes500 – 2,000 tonnes2,000 – 4,000 tonnes4,000 – 16,000 tonnesOver 16,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta801331097
Ontario000000
Quebec000000
British Columbia13000013
Saskatchewan10100011
Manitoba000000
Nova Scotia100001
New Brunswick000000
Newfoundland & Labrador100001
Northwest Territories100001
Nunavut000000
Prince Edward Island000000
Yukon000000

 

Other sectors:
Provinces/TerritoriesLess than 500 tonnes500 – 2,000 tonnes2,000 – 4,000 tonnes4,000 – 16,000 tonnesOver 16,000 tonnesTotal
Alberta83814096
Ontario1045410114
Quebec52121056
British Columbia45000045
Saskatchewan16100017
Manitoba13100014
Nova Scotia700007
New Brunswick600006
Newfoundland & Labrador400004
Northwest Territories100001
Nunavut000000
Prince Edward Island200002
Yukon000000

Source: National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) data for 2015

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