Ammonia Emissions

In 2012, ammonia (NH3) emissions were 495 kilotonnes (kt), a 23 kt (5%) increase from 2011 emissions levels. The level of NH3 emissions in 2012 was 93 kt (23%) higher than in 1990. The change in emission levels through this time is due to increased agricultural fertilizer use and larger livestock populations.

Ammonia emissions, Canada, 1990 to 2012

Ammonia emissions, Canada, 1990 to 2012

Long Description

The line chart shows ammonia emissions in Canada from 1990 to 2012. In 2012, ammonia emissions were 495 kilotonnes, a 23 kilotonne or 5% increase from 2011 emissions levels. The level of ammonia emissions in 2012 was 93 kilotonnes or 23% higher than in 1990.

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How this indicator was calculated

Note: Emissions from natural sources (such as biogenics) and open sources (such as road dust) are not included. However, emissions from open sources related to waste (such as landfills) and from agricultural activities for NH3 were included.
Source: Environment Canada (2014) 2012 Air Pollutant Emission Summaries and Historical Emission Trends.

Sources of ammonia emissions

In 2012, agricultural activity accounted for 90% (447 kt) of the total ammonia (NH3) emissions in Canada (national emissions = 495 kt). Transportation (road, rail, air and marine) emissions represented 5% (23 kt) of national emissions, followed by industrial sources, representing 3% (15 kt) of national emissions. The remaining sources contributed 1% of national emissions. Since 1990, the NH3 emissions from the agricultural sources increased by 86 kt.

Ammonia emissions by source, Canada, 1990 to 2012

Ammonia emissions by source, Canada, 1990 to 2012

Long Description

The stacked area chart shows ammonia emissions in Canada by source for the years 1990 to 2012. The emissions are expressed in kilotonnes. Since 1990, the ammonia emissions from agricultural sources increased by 86 kilotonnes.

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How this indicator was calculated

Note: Emissions from natural sources (such as biogenics) and open sources (such as road dust) are not included. However, emissions from open sources related to waste (such as landfills) and from agricultural activities for NH3 were included. Other Sources include home firewood burning, off-road vehicles, fuel for electricity and heating, and incineration and miscellaneous. Industry includes the oil and gas industry and other industries.
Source: Environment Canada (2014) 2012 Air Pollutant Emission Summaries and Historical Emission Trends.

Ammonia emissions from facilities


Environment Canada’s National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) provides detailed information on air pollutant emissions from industrial and commercial facilities. The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides access to this information through an online interactive map.

With the CESI interactive map, you can drill down to local areas and obtain details on NH3 emissions specific to reporting facilities.

Source: Environment Canada (2014) National Pollutant Release Inventory Online Data Search - Facility Reported Data.

Ammonia emissions by province and territory

Environment Canada is currently revising, in collaboration with provincial/territorial counterparts, the breakdown of total emissions by province and territory to reflect methodological improvements. Consequently, air pollutant emissions by province and territory could not be included in the update of the indicator at this time.

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