1995-Barry

Legend of sources

Barry made landfall over Nova Scotia as a tropical storm with winds of 93 km/h on July 9. Barry also made landfall over Newfoundland as a tropical storm with winds of 84 km/h on July 10.

Rainfall image map of Tropical Storm Barry, which made landfall over Nova Scotia as a tropical storm on July 9, 1995, and also made landfall over Newfoundland as a tropical storm on July 10, 1995. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 110 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 65 millimetres in Labrador
Rainfall image map of Tropical Storm Barry, which made landfall over Nova Scotia as a tropical storm on July 9, 1995, and also made landfall over Newfoundland as a tropical storm on July 10, 1995. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 110 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 65 millimetres in Labrador

Tropical Storm Barry originated off Florida’s east coast on July 5, 1995. Barry only reached tropical storm status with 110 km/h winds. Barry entered the CHC Response Zone on July 9, moving into Canadian waters shortly after midnight and then making landfall in eastern Nova Scotia in the evening. It carried winds up to 92 km/h in the CHC Response Zone and passed near Hart Island, Nova Scotia. The storm brought large amounts of rain and caused a few traffic accidents. On July 10, Barry was a weakening extratropical cyclone and lost its identity as it crossed the southeast coast of Labrador and dissipated. The CHC issued 13 Hurricane Information Statements.

Tropical Storm Barry started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone south of Nova Scotia with winds of 48 knots. It then tracked northeast and made landfall in Guysborough County and crossed through Western Cape Breton and into the Gulf of St. Lawrence with 34 knot winds. The storm then made landfall in eastern Quebec and tracked out into the Labrador Sea where it dissipated. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 55 knots, with an mslp of 995 millibar
Tropical Storm Barry started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone south of Nova Scotia with winds of 48 knots. It then tracked northeast and made landfall in Guysborough County and crossed through Western Cape Breton and into the Gulf of St. Lawrence with 34 knot winds. The storm then made landfall in eastern Quebec and tracked out into the Labrador Sea where it dissipated. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 55 knots, with an mslp of 995 millibar

Some CHCmeteorological data:

  • Over land, the strongest winds were 78 km/h at Fourchu head and strongest gusts were 100 km/h at Port-aux-Basques.
  • Over water, the Rowan Gorilla oil rig, located just west of Sable Island, reported a peak wind of 93 km/h gusting to 111 km/h.
  • Rainfall amounts varied considerably with the higher amounts to the left of the storm track and over western Nova Scotia. Halifax, Nova Scotia, recorded 94.2 mm while Farmington, Nova Scotia, had the highest amount with 95.1 mm. Moncton, New Brunswick, recorded 64.2 mm.

Nova Scotia

July 10, 1995

  • Winds gusting up to 40 km/h on the mainland and up to 80 km/h on Cape Breton (HH)
  • 91 mm rain on Digby County, 95.1mm rain on Farmington in Lunenburg County, 77.8mm rain on metro Halifax, 71.6 mm rain on Yarmouth (HH)
  • 1m of water on Wyse Road in Dartmouth, other streets in Dartmouth closed (HH)
  • Williams Lake Road in Halifax had sewers backed up with sewage in yards (HH)
  • Maritime Old Time Fiddling Contest was cancelled (HH)
  • Few traffic accidents; a car flipped over due to hydroplaning on Highway 102 (HH)