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1996-Edouard

Legend of sources

Hurricane Edouard formed southeast of the Cape Verde Islands on August 19, 1996. In the following days, Edouard developed into a category four hurricane, bringing winds that reached 231 km/h. Hurricane Edouard continued into the CHC Response Zone on September 1 and was then classified as a category two hurricane with winds of 157 km/h. Edouard then weakened to a marginal category one hurricane before reaching Canadian waters on the evening of September 2. The storm passed south of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, exiting the CHC Response Zone on September 6, but not before bringing heavy rain and high winds to Nova Scotia. The CHC issued 15 Hurricane Information Statements.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Edouard, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on September 1, 1996 and reached Canadian waters on the evening of September 2, 1996. The storm passed south of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, exiting the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on September 6, 1996. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 136 millimetres in Nova Scotia
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Edouard, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on September 1, 1996 and reached Canadian waters on the evening of September 2, 1996. The storm passed south of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, exiting the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on September 6, 1996. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 136 millimetres in Nova Scotia

Some CHC meteorological data:

  • Maximum wind speeds with Edouard were near 70 km/h, mainly along the Atlantic coast of the mainland Nova Scotia. A gust of 120 km/h was recorded over the Cape Breton Highlands. Over Atlantic waters, maximum speeds were in the 74 to 93 km/h range.
  • Maximum waves near the storm centre were close to11 m.
  • Higher than normal water levels were reported along the south coast of Nova Scotia where seas of 3 to 5 m were observed.
  • The highest amount of rainfall was 136 mm at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. The heaviest amount of rain fell when Edouard was at its closest point to land and at a time when the storm was moving the slowest. No significant rainfall was reported over Newfoundland.
Hurricane Edouard started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 64 knots north of storm centre and occurred southwest of Yarmouth. It took a turn east-northeast and stayed south of Nova Scotia to position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 48 knots east of storm centre. The storm stayed east-northeast and became post-tropical to position 3 outlined in brown with extended winds of 34 knots. It stayed south of Newfoundland and turned to the northeast and out of the response zone. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 70 knots, with an mslp of 976 millibar
Hurricane Edouard started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 64 knots north of storm centre and occurred southwest of Yarmouth. It took a turn east-northeast and stayed south of Nova Scotia to position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 48 knots east of storm centre. The storm stayed east-northeast and became post-tropical to position 3 outlined in brown with extended winds of 34 knots. It stayed south of Newfoundland and turned to the northeast and out of the response zone. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 70 knots, with an mslp of 976 millibar

September 4, 1996

  • A section of the Titanic was in the process of being raised from the ocean bottom. It was within 65 m from the surface when heavy seas caused ropes to slip, resulting in the section sinking back to the bottom of the Atlantic (ET)

Nova Scotia

September 3, 1996

  • Rainfall between 95 and 140 mm. Winds in Cape Breton were recorded at 120 km/h (CHC)
  • Marine Atlantic cancelled ferry services between Digby and Saint John, New Brunswick (ET)
  • Beaches were closed along the eastern shore of the province (ET)