1995-Opal

Legend of sources

Opal made landfall over Ontario as a tropical storm with winds of 74 km/h on October 6.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Opal, which entered Canada, Ontario on the morning of October 6, 1995. However, Opal transitioned into an extratropical storm and dissipated later that same day. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 108.5 millimetres in Ontario
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Opal, which entered Canada, Ontario on the morning of October 6, 1995. However, Opal transitioned into an extratropical storm and dissipated later that same day. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 108.5 millimetres in Ontario

Opal formed in the Gulf of Mexico and became a category four hurricane with winds of 240 km/h. Beginning on September 27, 1995, Opal remained over land and eventually moved into Ontario on the morning of October 6th with winds of 74 km/h. High winds and heavy rain caused power outages and flooding in Metro Toronto and the southern Ontario region. Montreal also received a significant amount of rainfall. The most affected area was southern Ontario, just north of Lakes Erie and Ontario. Total rainfall amounts were between 40 and 80 mm with a total of 96 mm reported from Hamilton. Some of these amounts fell in 18 hours--amounts equivalent to the average amount for the entire month of October. Strong easterly winds also affected this area. The peak wind was 102 km/h at Long Point in Lake Erie. Opal transitioned into an extratropical storm and dissipated later on October 6. The CHC issued 2 Hurricane Information Statements.

Post Tropical Storm Opal started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone northeast through the northeastern states and crossed Lake Erie and tracked east-northeast along Lake Ontario before dissipating over Quebec. There were no gales associated with the storm. As it tracked through Eastern Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 43 knots, with an mslp of 991 millibar
Post Tropical Storm Opal started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone northeast through the northeastern states and crossed Lake Erie and tracked east-northeast along Lake Ontario before dissipating over Quebec. There were no gales associated with the storm. As it tracked through Eastern Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 43 knots, with an mslp of 991 millibar

Ontario

October 6, 1995

  • Wind gusts of up to 102 km/h in southern Ontario and 25 to 45 mm of rain (TS)
  • The storm knocked down trees and power lines and caused flooding (TS)

October 7, 1995

  • Total of 78.6 mm of rain fell on metro Toronto (TS)

Quebec

October 7, 1995

  • Montreal received 80 mm rain, which was only 2 mm short of beating a 16 year old record (Hurricane Frederic) (MG)