CANUSWEST - SOUTH

Annex I to the Canada–United States
Joint Inland Pollution Contingency Plan

A Plan for Response to Polluting Incidents along the Inland Boundary between the Province of British Columbia, Canada and the States of Montana, Washington, and Idaho, United States of America

Environment Canada, Pacific & Yukon Region
Environmental Protection Agency, Regions & 10
2014

PDF - 6.1 MB

Table of contents

Letter of promulgation

The Canada–United States Joint Inland Pollution Contingency Plan (the “Inland Plan”), originally signed by the Government of Canada’s Minister of the Environment and the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) Administrator in July 1994, and revised and signed in October 2009, sets forth cooperative measures for dealing with a release of a pollutant along the inland boundary of a magnitude that causes, or may cause, damage to the environment or constitutes a threat to public safety, security, health, welfare, or property.

The Inland Plan may also facilitate the provision of assistance in the event that only one country is affected, but the polluting incident is of sufficient magnitude to justify a request for assistance from the other country.

The Inland Plan includes five Regional Annexes. This CANUSWEST - SOUTH Annex addresses the inland boundary between the Province of British Columbia, Canada and the States of Montana, Washington, and Idaho, United States of America.

A fundamental premise under which CANUSWEST - SOUTH operates is that the Responsible Party (RP) is to take the lead role in a response and that the government is to assume the lead role only if the RP’s response is inadequate or otherwise deemed inappropriate. Further, the federal government’s role is to be determined in accordance with the response escalation, i.e., the response is to be led first at the local or community level, followed by the provincial, territorial or state level, and finally the federal level, as additional resources and expertise are needed.

Consistent with the Inland Plan, CANUSWEST - SOUTH is not intended to supersede any statutory authorities held by either Participants, to create any legally binding rights or obligations under domestic or international law with regard to the Participants or any other entity, or to create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable by law or equity against the Participants or any other entity. CANUSWEST - SOUTH recognizes that First Nations in Canada have constitutionally protected Aboriginal and treaty rights and provides for their participation when their lands are impacted or threatened. Similarly, CANUSWEST - SOUTH also recognizes the interests of U.S. Tribal Nations, their sovereign fundamental or inherent rights, as well as any treaty protected rights and provides for their participation when their lands are impacted or threatened. CANUSWEST - SOUTH is to be reviewed periodically by Environment Canada’s (EC’s) Environmental Emergencies Program and U.S. EPA’s Regions 8 and 10, and amended as required.

We, the undersigned, endorse the process described in CANUSWEST - SOUTH for the response to a release of a pollutant which causes, or may cause, damage to the environment or constitutes a threat to public safety, security, health, welfare, or property along the shared inland boundary between the Province of British Columbia, Canada and the States of Montana, Washington, and Idaho, United States of America.

Signed, in duplicate, in the English and French languages.

Marc D’Iorio
Director General
Environmental Protection
Operations Directorate
Environment Canada
Date: 6/9/2015

Shaun McGrath
Regional Administrator
Region 8
U.S. EPA
Date: 4/8/2015

Dennis J. McLerran
Regional Administrator
Region 10
U.S. EPA
Date: 5/15/2015

100 Introduction

101 Purpose

The overall purpose of the CANUSWEST - SOUTH Annex is to provide details on jurisdictional roles and responsibilities as well as on response procedures related to the implementation of the Inland Plan in EC’s Pacific & Yukon Region and EPA’s Regions 8 and 10.

102 Objectives

The objectives of the CANUSWEST - SOUTH Annex are to:

  • enable timely and accurate notification of federal, provincial/territorial/state, First and Tribal Nations, and local authorities concerning polluting incidents that occur along the shared inland boundary between the Province of British Columbia and the States of Montana, Washington, and Idaho that are of a magnitude that causes, or may cause, damage to the environment or constitutes a threat to public safety, security, health, welfare, or property;
  • establish effective preparedness and response cooperation mechanisms between Canada and the U.S. to deal with such polluting incidents, when there is either the potential for cross-border impacts or when only one country is likely to be impacted but the size of the incident might justify a request for assistance from the other country;
  • comply with applicable health and safety standards of each country as part of any joint response effort;
  • enable the safe and timely movement of adequate resources including personnel, equipment and supplies across the Canada-U.S. border to respond to a polluting incident; and
  • coordinate timely public information releases in both countries.

103 Geographical scope

CANUSWEST - SOUTH applies to that portion of the Canada-U.S. inland boundary (an approximate 25 km or 15.5 mile zone on each side of the border) between the Province of British Columbia and the States of Montana, Washington, and Idaho.

Figure 1: CANUSWEST - South geographical area

FIGURE 1: CANUSWEST - SOUTH Geographical Area

Description

“Geographical representation of the inland boundaries of the Plan, between the Province of British Columbia and the States of Washington, Montana, and Idaho. ”

Figure 1 - CANUSWEST - SOUTH applies to that portion of the Canada-U.S. inland boundary (an approximate 25 km or 15.5 mile zone on each side of the border) between the Province of British Columbia and the States of Montana, Washington, and Idaho, as depicted in Figure 1 – CANUSWEST - SOUTH Geographical Area.

Figure 2: CANUSWEST - South contingency plan zone cities

FIGURE 2: CANUSWEST - SOUTH Contingency Plan Zone Cities

Description

“Geographical representation of the population centers within the inland boundaries of the Plan, between the Province of British Columbia and the States of Washington, Montana, and Idaho. ”

Figure 2 – CANUSWEST - SOUTH Contingency Plan Zone Cities is a more detailed view of the CANUSWEST - SOUTH border area showing population centers.

Figure 3: CANUSWEST - South contingency plan zone water bodies

FIGURE 3: CANUSWEST - SOUTH Contingency Plan Zone Water Bodies

Description

“Geographical representation of the water bodies in or near the CANUSWEST - SOUTH border area, or forming part of the international boundary within the inland boundaries of the Plan, between the Province of British Columbia and the States of Washington, Montana, and Idaho.”

Figure 3 – CANUSWEST - SOUTH Contingency Plan Zone Water Bodies shows shared water bodies, water bodies in or near the CANUSWEST - SOUTH border area, and/or rivers flowing across the inland boundary or forming part of the international boundary.

104 List of acronyms

ACP (U.S.) Area Contingency Plan

BOC (Canada) Border Operations Centre (CBSA)

CBP (U.S.) Customs and Border Protection

CBSA (Canada) Canada Border Services Agency

DHS (U.S.) Department of Homeland Security

EC (Canada) Environment Canada

EPA (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency

FCC (U.S.) Federal Communication Commission

FEMA (U.S.) Federal Emergency Management Agency

HRSDC (Canada) Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

HSOC (U.S.) Homeland Security Operations Center

IC (Canada) Industry Canada

ICS (Canada-U.S.) Incident Command System

ICSU (U.S.) Incident Communications Support Unit

IRAC (U.S.) Inter-department Radio Advisory Committee

LNO (U.S.) Liaison Officer

MOC (U.S.) Mobile Operations Center

NCP (U.S.) National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan

NIFC (U.S.) National Interagency Fire Center

NRF (U.S.) National Response Framework

NTIA (U.S.) National Telecommunications and Information Administration

OSC (Canada-U.S.) On-Scene Coordinator

OSM (U.S.) Office of Spectrum Management

REET (Canada) Regional Environmental Emergencies Team

RJRT (Canada-U.S.) Regional Joint Response Team

RP (Canada-U.S.) Responsible Party

RRT (U.S.) Regional Response Team

SSC (U.S.) Scientific Support Coordinator

Science Table (Canada) Environmental Emergencies Science Table

UC (U.S.) Unified Command

UCS (U.S.) Unified Command System

UHF Ultra High Frequency

U.S. United States

USDA (U.S.) United States Department of Agriculture

VHF Very High Frequency

WCB (Canada) Workers’ Compensation Board

105 Definitions

The following terms are defined for the purpose of the CANUSWEST - SOUTH Annex:

105.1 Homeland Security Operations Center (HSOC) (U.S.). The HSOC serves as regional and national-level multi-agency situational awareness and operational coordination center for the United States. The HSOC is the primary national hub for domestic incident management, operational coordination, and situational awareness. The HSOC is a standing, 24-hours-per-day/7-days-per-week interagency organization fusing law enforcement, national intelligence, emergency response, and private sector reporting. The HSOC facilitates homeland security information-sharing and operational coordination with other federal, state, local, tribal, first nations, and non-governmental Emergency Operation Centers.

105.2 Liaison Officer (LNO) (U.S.). The LNO is the liaison between the U.S Federal On-Scene Coordinator (OSC) and the Regional Joint Response Team (RJRT) and is the advisor to the OSC on RJRT matters. The LNO, assigned to the Unified Command, facilitates the flow of information between the RJRT and the OSC.

105.3 Scientific Support Coordinator (SSC) (U.S.). The SSC serves under the direction of the OSC during a response to a polluting incident, and is responsible for providing scientific support for operational decisions and for coordinating on-scene scientific activity.

105.4 Unified Command (UC) (U.S.). An incident command function that can be used in managing complex responses. A UC, as part of an Incident Command System (ICS), brings together the “incident commanders” from each organization involved in a response to allow key decision-makers to develop consensus, coordination, and cooperation.

200 Response organization

201 Regional Joint Response Team (RJRT)

The composition of the Regional Joint Response Team (RJRT) is to be established in accordance with the needs of a specific incident. Organizations that may comprise the RJRT are those that are listed in Sections 202 and 203 as members of Canada’s Environmental Emergencies Science Table (Science Table) and the U.S. Regional Response Teams (RRTs), respectively.

202 Environmental Emergencies Science Table (Science Table) – Canada

The Environmental Emergencies Science Table (the “Science Table”) builds upon, and replaces the former Regional Environmental Emergencies Team (REET) model.

In the event of a significant polluting incident requiring a heightened level of response and multi-agency cooperation, EC can convene the Science Table and provide consolidated, consensus-based environmental advice for consideration by the On-Scene Coordinator (OSC) and for implementation by the RP.

The Science Table brings together scientific and technical specialists from federal, provincial/territorial and local governments, First Nations, environmental non-government organizations, industry and academic institutions.

Science Table Members address environmental concerns, protection and clean-up priorities and strategies. Members can adapt the scale of response to a particular polluting incident, and provide a forum for rapidly gathering, coordinating and synthesizing environmental information into timely and practical advice. This contributes to minimizing damage to human life or health, or the environment, while maximizing the use of limited response resources and optimizing the environmental response.

During response to a significant polluting incident, the Science Table is to provide advice on a wide range of scientific and technical issues, including but not limited to: resource protection and spill clean-up priorities, spill behavior, environmental/human health impacts of hazardous substances, spill countermeasures and waste disposal. In addition, Science Table Members are to carry out a number of important spill response functions, including but not limited to: supplying environmental sensitivity information, monitoring of environmental impacts, providing advice on the coordination of the rescue and rehabilitation of wildlife, spill trajectory and dispersion modeling, compilation of meteorological data and weather forecasts, hazardous materials (HAZMAT) advice, coordination of shoreline cleanup assessment techniques, and documenting environmental damage.

The Science Table provides response advice but does not physically respond to the polluting incident.

The Science Table is chaired by EC.

Science Table Members

The following lists potential Member Agencies; other representatives may be requested to join the Science Table, as appropriate:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Environment Canada (Chair)

First Nations

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Habitat Protection and Canadian Coast Guard)

Health Canada

Justice Canada

National Defense

Parks Canada

Public Safety Canada

Public Works and Government Services Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Transport Canada

British Columbia Ministry of the Environment

British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations

British Columbia Ministry of Health

Municipalities

203 Regional Response Teams (RRTs) – United States

RRTs are composed of representatives from U.S. federal agencies, the States of Montana, Washington, and Idaho, United States of America, and/or Native American Tribes, as listed below. RRTs are primarily preparedness, planning and support organizations. Their function is fully described in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP).

In the preparedness aspects of their responsibilities, RRTs promote training activities at all levels of government in order to assure that the organizations that are to reach the scene of an incident first are to be knowledgeable regarding appropriate safety, health, and response techniques.

The planning activities include preparing a plan for how a RRT is to function in the event of an emergency. RRTs are also to promote the preparation of state, county and local response plans.

Although implied by its name, a RRT does not respond to an incident, but rather provides advice and support to the OSC during an incident. The support can vary from legal interpretations of existing statutes to providing human resources and equipment in response to an incident.

RRTs are to be co-chaired by EPA and the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). During a polluting incident, the EPA co-chair is to assume the RRT leadership position for inland incidents, and the U.S.CG is to assume RRT leadership for marine incidents. At no time is a RRT to direct the response actions of the Unified Command System (UCS) or OSC. RRTs can draw on all of the experience and expertise of their member agencies to provide advice and support to the Unified Command (UC) on both technical and scientific issues.

RRT Members

Department of Agriculture

Department of Commerce

Department of Defense

Department of Energy

Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Homeland Security

Department of Interior

Department of Justice

Department of Labor

Department of State

Department of the Treasury

Department of Transportation

Environmental Protection Agency

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Food and Drug Administration

General Services Administration

Native American Tribe(s)

Nuclear Regulatory Commission

U.S. Coast Guard

300 Agreements and plans

301 Canadian agreements and plans

301.1 Federal Emergency Response Plan

301.2 Environmental Emergencies Response Operations Plan

301.3 British Columbia Hazardous Materials Response Plan (2013)

301.4 British Columbia Inland Oil Response Plan (2013)

301.5 Applicable regional and municipal emergency response plans

302 U.S. Agreements and plans

302.1 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP)

302.2 Northwest Area Contingency Plan

302.3 Region 8 Regional Contingency Plan

302.4 National Response Framework (NRF)

302.5 Applicable State and Local Emergency Response Plans

303 Joint agreements and plans

303.1 Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States on Emergency Management Cooperation (2009)

303.2 International Hazardous Materials Response Plan for Whatcom County and the Lower Mainland of British Columbia

400 Customs and immigration

Whether crossing the border for response activities from the Canadian side or the U.S. side, the basic process to cross the border is similar. Before workers and their vehicles, equipment and supplies cross the border to respond to a polluting incident, EC and/or EPA officials are to provide advance notification to both the Canadian and U.S. border control agencies, using the contact coordinates for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) outlined in Tabs B1 and B2, respectively. The notification is to provide information on the response, the fact that it is being conducted under the Inland Plan, the specific individuals (including their name, date of birth, and passport number or other Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative compliant document number), vehicles, equipment, and supplies involved in the response, and where and when the workers are planning to cross the border. Tab B1 contains the telephone and facsimile numbers as well as the e-mail address to be used to notify CBSA. Tab B2 contains a list of CBP offices and their telephone and facsimile numbers.

Two copies of information on equipment and supplies contained in each vehicle, including serial numbers and declared values, should be in the possession of persons in the vehicles crossing the border. These copies should be presented to both Canadian and U.S. officials at the border crossing, where they are to be stamped/certified. These copies should be retained by the workers and presented again to Canadian and U.S. officials when the border is re-crossed at the conclusion of response activities.

If work activities are to be conducted along the border but not at or requiring a border crossing, the nearest Canadian and U.S. border crossing stations should be notified. In the case of the CBSA, such notifications are to be provided to the CBSA Border Operations Centre (BOC) at the contact coordinates provided in Tab B1. The BOC, in turn, is to advise the CBSA port(s) of entry.

401 Employment and immigration procedures for the deployment of workers from Canada into the United States

When there is a requirement for Canadian workers to enter the U.S. following activation of the Inland Plan, an EPA official (typically the RRT Co-Chair or the EPA OSC) is to notify CBSA and U.S. CBP of this activation, and that Canadian workers are to be entering the U.S. to assist in responding to a polluting incident. The telephone notification is to be made to the appropriate CBSA BOC and U.S. CBP port of entry, and is to be confirmed in writing to CBSA and CBP at the first opportunity following the telephone notification. The contact coordinates for the CBSA BOC are included in Tab B1. CBP telephone and facsimile numbers, as well as a list of applicable CBP offices and their telephone and facsimile numbers, are included in Tab B2. Please note that CBSA is to accept confirmation of the telephone notification either by facsimile or by e-mail. In order to protect the information that is requested by both Border Agencies, it is recommended that when the telephone notification is made, the preferred method for secure information sharing be discussed.

The following procedures are to be respected to ensure compliance with U.S. CBP procedures (if possible, CBP should be notified at least 24 hours in advance):

  • The EPA official is to verify, based upon the documentation provided by the Canadian responder(s), that they are properly trained. This information is to be conveyed to CBP.
  • Response organizations are to complete a CBP Form I-94 (a sample form is available for viewing) for each response worker.
  • Response organizations are to provide safe transport for a CBP Officer to inspect response operations, as needed.
  • All personnel are to have proper identification with them. Non-Canadian citizens are to have a passport and a valid visa in their possession, unless they are a citizen of a country eligible for the Visa Waiver Program. Canadian citizens are to provide a Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative compliant document, such as: Passport, Enhanced Driver’s License, Trusted Traveler Card (NEXUS, SENTRI or FAST), or Secure Certificate of Indian Status. Please note that entry requirements are determined by the appropriate authorities and are subject to change at any time.
  • Upon departing from the U.S., Canadian workers are to stop and report out through a CBP port of entry.

402 Customs and Excise Procedures for the Deployment of Equipment from Canada into the United States

When there is a requirement for Canadian equipment to enter the U.S. following activation of the Inland Plan, an EPA official (typically the RRT Co-Chair or the EPA OSC) is to notify CBSA and the U.S. CBP of this activation, and that Canadian equipment is to be entering the U.S. to be used in responding to a polluting incident. The telephone notification is to be made to CBSA’s BOC and the appropriate U.S. CBP port of entry, and is to be confirmed in writing to CBSA and CBP at the first opportunity following the telephone notification. The contact coordinates for CBSA’s BOC are included in Tab B1. CBP telephone and facsimile numbers, as well as a list of applicable CBP offices and their telephone and facsimile numbers, are included in Tab B2. Please note that CBSA is to accept confirmation of the telephone notification either by facsimile or by e-mail. In order to protect the information that is requested by both Border Agencies, it is recommended that when the telephone notification is made, the preferred method for secure information sharing be discussed.

It is anticipated that the U.S. Customs Port Director may authorize or direct the following activities under the authority of U.S. Customs and Immigration Regulations Section 13322(b), subsections 2.3 of Title 19, U.S. Code:

  • Incident-specific response equipment may be given expedited entry/clearance with no duty or other fees imposed.
  • Upon arrival at the border crossing station, response personnel are to provide Canadian and U.S. officials with a Certificate of Registration Form 4455 for each vehicle. Additionally, all equipment and materials in each vehicle that is mobilized are to be listed on an equipment list with its declared value. This equipment list is to be attached to Form 4455; two copies of each Form 4455 and attached equipment list are to be made available for review/use by both CBSA officers and U.S. CBP Officers.
  • Equipment that enters the U.S. from areas other than a port of entry (e.g., air or water) is to be reported to U.S. CBP within 10 days.
  • Material, equipment or supplies dispatched from Canada are to remain under supervisory control of an appropriate Canadian authority, and are to be brought back within 90 days unless an extension is granted or other arrangements were made at the outset of the response.
  • Consumables need not be returned. An account of all equipment and materials is to be maintained during the response efforts to explain any variance due to use or loss, including consumables. Both Border Agencies are expected to question the discrepancy and what is the disposition of the equipment/materials (e.g., protective suits used and disposed of on location of the polluting incident).

Activities which would facilitate movement of equipment back to Canada after the incident would include: identifying ports of entry and projected crossing times; and maintaining dispatches stamped by CBSA which list the equipment in each vehicle, and which can be presented to U.S. CBP Officers upon crossing either back into or out of Canada.

When the emergency requires the use of equipment that contains radioactive sources, border crossing of such equipment is to be coordinated by the Science Table Chair and RRT Chair.

Canadian government owned vehicles travelling into U.S. territory (25 kilometers inland) to perform joint exercises, discuss preparedness and response issues, as well as to assist in the response to a significant border incident, will have the necessary third party automobile liability insurance coverage.

403 Employment and immigration procedures for the deployment of workers from the United States into Canada

When there is a requirement for U.S. workers to enter Canada following activation of the Inland Plan, the Science Table Chair is to notify CBSA and U.S. CBP of this activation, and that U.S. workers are to be entering Canada to assist in responding to a polluting incident. The telephone notification is to be made to CBSA’s BOC and the appropriate U.S. CBP port of entry, and is to be confirmed in writing to CBSA and CBP at the first opportunity following the telephone notification. Tab B1 contains the contact coordinates for CBSA’s BOC. CBP telephone and facsimile numbers, as well as a list of applicable CBP offices and their telephone and facsimile numbers, are included in Tab B2. Please note that CBSA is to accept confirmation of the telephone notification either by facsimile or by e-mail. In order to protect the information that is requested by both Border Agencies, it is recommended that when the telephone notification is made, the preferred method for secure information sharing be discussed.

  • Response personnel are to provide to CBSA officers a valid passport or other Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative compliant document that guarantees re-entry into the U.S.
  • Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations section 186(t) allows a foreign national to work in Canada without a work permit as a provider of emergency services, including medical services, for the protection or preservation of life or property.
  • If possible, border crossings should be coordinated with EPA such that EPA and the contractors cross the border as one group. If this is not possible, an EPA official should be present at the border crossing, or be in contact with CBSA’s BOC when the contractors arrive in order to facilitate crossing activities.

404 Customs and excise procedures for the deployment of equipment from the United States into Canada

When there is a requirement for U.S. equipment to enter Canada following activation of the Inland Plan, the Science Table Chair is to notify CBSA and U.S. CBP of this activation, and that U.S. equipment is to be entering Canada to be used in responding to a polluting incident. The telephone notification is to be made to CBSA’s BOC and the appropriate U.S. CBP port of entry, and is to be confirmed in writing to CBSA and CBP at the first opportunity following the telephone notification. Tab B1 contains the contact coordinates for CBSA’s BOC. CBP telephone and facsimile numbers, as well as a list of applicable CBP offices and their telephone and facsimile numbers, are included in Tab B2. Please note that CBSA is to accept confirmation of the telephone notification either by facsimile or by e-mail. In order to protect the information that is requested by both Border Agencies, it is recommended that when the telephone notification is made, the preferred method for secure information sharing be discussed.

CBSA Memorandum D8-1-1 provides the guidelines for temporary importation of emergency goods. Goods imported for use in response to an emergency qualify under tariff item No. 9993.00.00, and the Goods and Services Tax / Harmonized Sales Tax is fully relieved under the Goods for Emergency Use Remission Order (Order in Council 73-2529). As the goods are required on site quickly, the inspecting CBSA officer is to try to expedite the clearance of the goods. No security deposit is to be collected and, where the inspecting CBSA officer deems it necessary, only a simple blotter record on a Form E29B is to be kept describing the goods in general terms. Depending on the circumstances, a Form E29B can also be issued after the fact.

When goods imported under the Goods for Emergency Use Remission Order are consumed or destroyed in response to the emergency, they cannot be exported. The Temporary Importation (Tariff Item No. 9993.00.00) Regulations waive the requirement to provide proof of export for these goods. Where a Form E29B was completed at the time of importation, a Form B3 should be completed for any goods that are not to be exported. Special authorization code 73-2529 is to be entered in field 26 and, where necessary, “9993” should be entered in field 28. A Form E15 or a statement signed by a responsible individual attesting to the consumption or destruction of the goods in Canada is to accompany Form B3. Examples of the types of goods that qualify include, but are not limited to, fire suppressant foams, neutralizing agents, dispersants, etc.

A “responsible individual” includes, but is not limited to, a chief of police, a fire chief, a municipal mayor, a representative of the provincial/territorial government or another individual charged with responsibility for directing the emergency countermeasures.

Upon arrival at the border, response personnel are to provide Canadian and U.S. border officials with a CBP Form 4455 Certificate of Registration for each vehicle. Additionally, all equipment and materials in each vehicle that is mobilized are to be listed on an equipment list with their declared value. This equipment list is to be attached to Form 4455; two copies of each Form 4455 and attached equipment list are to be made available for review/use by both the CBSA officers and CBP officers.

Drivers of U.S. government-owned vehicles are to coordinate with Canadian officials (e.g., Science Table Chair) prior to entry of the vehicles(s) into Canada.

  • U.S. government owned vehicles travelling into Canadian territory (25 kilometers inland) to perform joint exercises, discuss preparedness and response issues, as well as to assist in the response to a significant border incident, will have the necessary third party automobile liability insurance coverage.
  • The driver of the vehicle transporting the goods into Canada is to carry two copies of the equipment list that includes serial numbers and monetary values. It is advisable to have this list stamped by U.S. CBP to aid in the re-entry procedure.
  • All vehicles departing from Canada are to report to CBSA to have their E29B permits cancelled. Upon completion of response activities in Canada and prior to re-entry into the U.S., responding personnel are to notify the Plant Protection and Quarantine Office at the U.S. CBP office. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) requires that all of the response equipment be properly decontaminated and free of debris prior to returning to the U.S.
  • Consumables need not be returned. An account of all equipment and materials is to be maintained during the response efforts to explain any variance due to use or loss, including consumables. Both Border Agencies are expected to request an explanation for the discrepancy and the disposition of the equipment/materials (e.g., protective suits used and disposed of on location of the polluting incident).

When the emergency requires the use of equipment that contains radioactive sources, border crossing of such equipment is to be coordinated by the Science Table Chair and the RRT Chair.

500 Health and safety training, site safety planning and worker compensation

501 Health and safety training – Canada and United States

Emergency response personnel deployed from either Canada to the U.S. or from the U.S. to Canada under this Plan are to be certified as having successfully completed the 40-hour HAZWOPER course, refreshed, at a minimum, biennially. Additional health and safety training may also be stipulated based on requirements set forth in the Site Specific Safety Plan for specific cross-border responses.

502 Site safety plan requirements

A written site safety plan should be prepared for all cross-border responses prior to a response action that addresses personnel monitoring, environmental monitoring, hazard identification, briefings, site security, decontamination procedures and other related issues.

If separate plans have been prepared by Canadian and U.S. responders, the appointed Safety Officers representing each country are to meet to exchange information, resolve any differences, and develop one Site Specific Safety Plan. A written site safety plan should be prepared for all cross-border responses prior to a response action that addresses personnel monitoring, environmental monitoring, hazard identification, briefings, site security, decontamination procedures and other related issues.

503 Worker compensation – Government of Canada

The Canadian Federal Government provides benefits to all employees of the federal government and most Crown Agencies, except members of the regular Forces of the Canadian Forces (CF) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), under the Government Employees Compensation Act, administered by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). Instead of establishing its own system for compensation and treatment, the government uses the services already available through Provincial Workers’ Compensation Boards (WCBs). As long as employees are engaged in work for their department or agency at the time of the accident, they are covered by the Act, wherever they may be working, in Canada or abroad.

504 Worker compensation – Government of the United States

Under the U.S. Federal Employee Compensation Act, U.S. Government Civil Service workers are covered in both Canada and the U.S. if they are performing work pursuant to their government positions. The level and type of coverage is dependent upon the type of injury and its duration. Because of the complexity of the law, a detailed discussion of the specific provision is not provided herein.

505 Worker compensation – Province of British Columbia

In British Columbia (BC), workers compensation is provided through the Workers Compensation Act (and associated Regulations) of British Columbia. The Act applies to all workers and employers in BC, and also provides automatic extension of coverage if injured while working outside of BC. BC employees conducting spill response activities in the United States would be covered by the Act for up to 6 months. Details of coverage for BC workers while out of province are provided in section 8 of the Act.

The Act does not provide coverage for employees or agents of either Canadian or U.S. Federal Governments. Non-BC employers and workers, who temporarily operate in BC (on an intermittent basis of less than 10 days per year, or continuously up to 15 days per year) are not covered under the Act, if coverage exists from another jurisdiction. U.S. workers responding to spills in BC should check with their State authorities to determine their coverage.

506 Worker compensation – States of Montana, Washington, and Idaho

Non-federal U.S. workers in the U.S. obtain workers’ compensation benefits through a combination of their respective employers and their employers’ insurance coverage, as overseen by designated state Agencies. This U.S.-based workers’ compensation program provides coverage for non-federal U.S. workers on temporary assignment in any Canadian province.

506.1 State of Montana

A company doing business in Montana is required to have insurance to provide their workers with workers compensation coverage. If a worker is asked to perform work in Canada, the company would need to check with their insurance company to determine whether the worker would be covered.

Canadian workers may work in Montana without obtaining Montana workers compensation insurance, but they would need to be covered by a Canadian workers compensation program. In addition, they would need to notify the State that they were working in Montana. The State of Montana requires that any construction work, which is performed in Montana, must be performed by a company which is licensed in Montana. This precludes Canadian companies from performing any construction work in the State.

Volunteers are exempt from workers compensation requirements and they are not able to receive any workers compensation benefits. If any sort of compensation is provided to a person, such as lodging, that person is no longer a volunteer and the State workers compensation requirements would apply.

Before conducting business in the State of Montana, companies should review the following sections of Montana State Law which deal with workers compensation:

  • Title 39, Chapter 71, Section 401 - Employment Covered and Employment Exempted;
  • Title 39, Chapter 71, Section 402 - Extra Territorial Application and Reciprocity; and
  • Title 39, Chapter 71, Sections 426-427.

In addition, the companies should contact the State of Montana Department of Labor and Industry, Workers Compensation Regulation Bureau.

506.2 State of Washington

A person who works for a business, which is registered in the State of Washington, will be covered by the Washington workers compensation program, provided that the injury occurs while performing work directed by his employer. It makes no difference whether that work is performed in the US or in another country. The State of Washington program does not cover federal employees.

In general, volunteers are not covered by the Washington workers compensation program. Volunteers may be covered for medical expenses only, if they are registered with an organization and that organization elects to cover the volunteers. Note: the volunteers would not be covered for lost wages. This would include volunteers from Canada, if their work was directed by a Washington organization and that organization elected to carry coverage for the volunteers.

A worker from British Columbia coming into the State of Washington to respond to a spill would be covered by the State of Washington workers compensation, only if the worker was not covered by British Columbia workers compensation or, in the case of a Canadian federal employee, the Canadian federal workers compensation program.

For a worker from the State of Washington working in Canada, it is advisable (not required) that the employer provides an Accident Report Form to the employee.

More detailed information about workers compensation coverage for companies certified in the State of Washington can be found in RCW 51.12.

506.3 State of Idaho

The State of Idaho requires that companies doing business in Idaho provide insurance to cover workers compensation in the event of an injury to a worker. A worker from Idaho who is required, as part of his/her job, to perform work in Canada and who is injured while working in Canada would, in most cases, be covered by the Idaho workers compensation program.

A Canadian company doing short term temporary work in Idaho would not be required to obtain an Idaho workers’ compensation policy. If a Canadian worker is injured in Idaho while performing short term temporary work, that person could apply for Idaho workers compensation but it is not likely to be awarded, given that there is no fund in Idaho to cover the expense. There is an expectation that the worker would be covered by Canadian federal or provincial workers compensation.

In general, volunteers working on a spill cleanup would not be covered by Idaho workers compensation. It is conceivable that volunteers could be covered if they receive compensation such as housing from an organization; however, the organization that was providing the compensation would have to have provisions in their insurance plan that would provide for the coverage. For detailed information regarding the State of Idaho Workers Compensation Program, see Idaho Code 72 or contact the State of Idaho Industrial Commission.

507 Management of volunteers – Canada and United States

In Canada, volunteers are the responsibility of the RP or its agent(s) and as such are to be afforded health and safety training, tools and protective equipment in accordance with the requirements set forth in the British Columbia Workers Compensation Actand the British Columbia Employment Standards Act.

It is BC Ministry of Environment Policy to triage and screen volunteers who will then be hired to participate in response operations. BC and foreign volunteers are generally not covered under the Act. However, volunteer firefighters working for a municipality, city, town, village, etc. are covered as are volunteers registered with, and working under the direction of, Emergency Management BC. Covered volunteers are provided the same benefits and protection as workers regardless of venue, i.e. inside or outside of BC.

In the U.S., voluntary services are to be accepted in accordance with 31 U.S.C § 1342. The coordination and training of volunteers in the U.S. is to be handled by the OSC. Volunteers are to be afforded the same level of health and safety precautions and consideration as primary responders. Volunteers should be assigned to perform a specific task/duty which coincides with their level of training and the needs of the response. All volunteers are to be prepared to provide documentation of their training when reporting for deployment to the response.

600 Telecommunications

601 Integrated telecommunications plan

A telecommunications control center is to be operated at a safe location that provides UHF/VHF radio coverage across the border corridor. Frequencies and equipment in use are to be integrated into the Telecommunications Center without disruption of existing lines of communication at the incident scene.

Communications at the incident are to be managed through the use of a common telecommunications plan and an incident-based communications center established solely for the use of tactical and support resources assigned to the incident.

All communications among organizational elements at an incident should be in plain English. No codes should be used, and all communications should be confined only to essential messages.

The Telecommunications Unit is to be responsible for all communications planning at the incident. This is to include mission-specific radio networks, on-site telephone, public address, and off-incident telephone/microwave/radio systems, as well as assigned and non-assigned cellular telephones, satellite telephones, facsimile machines, and designated e-mail communications.

602 Radio networks

Radio networks for large-scale incidents should normally be organized as follows:

Command and Control Net Frequency – This Net should link together the Incident Commander, key staff members, Section Chiefs, Division and Group Supervisors.

Tactical Nets – There may be several Tactical Nets. They may be established around agencies, departments, geographical areas or even specific functions. The determination of how Nets are set-up should be a joint Planning and Operations responsibility. The Communications Unit Leader is to develop the plan.

Support Net – A Support Net is to be established, primarily to handle status changing for resources as well as for support requests and certain other non-tactical or command traffic.

Ground-to-Air Net – A ground-to-air tactical frequency may be designated, or regular Tactical Nets may be used to coordinate ground to air traffic.

Air-to-Air Nets – Air-to-Air Nets are normally to be pre-designated and assigned for aircraft in use at the incident site.

603 Canadian networks

In Canada, telecommunications issues are regulated by Industry Canada (IC). Specifically, the Spectrum Management - Radio Licensing and Investigations Division of IC is responsible for the licensing and allocation of radio frequencies within Canada. If additional radio frequencies are needed for a cross border incident, EC is to contact IC for assistance.

604 United States networks

In the U.S., the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), and the Inter-Department Radio Advisory Committee (IRAC) all play an important role in the licensing, management and allocation of radio frequencies. The FCC regulates non-governmental interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable. NTIA (Office of Spectrum Management (OSM)) is responsible for managing the federal government’s use of the radio frequency spectrum. To achieve this, OSM receives assistance and advice from the IRAC. If additional radio frequencies are needed for a cross border incident, an application is to be made to NTIA (or the FCC for non-governmental organizations).

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is an independent Agency of the federal government under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that responds, upon request of state officials, to disasters and significant incidents. FEMA may utilize a Mobile Operations Center (MOC) to replace failed telecommunication systems or to provide a communication interface between agencies with incompatible telecommunication systems. FEMA assistance can be activated through the OSC or RRT Chair.

The National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC), located in Boise, Idaho includes the Incident Communications Support Unit (ICSU), an interagency organization comprised of the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management. The ICSU is responsible for providing emergency communications to all-risk incidents. It is the largest cache of low power, portable emergency communications equipment housed at a single location in the world. The ICSU of NIFC can be activated through the OSC.

700 Demobilization

ICS is to develop a demobilization plan to identify both short-term and long-term objectives and specific phase-down procedures. It is possible that resource availability, applicable laws or regulations, or other factors may call for one federal agency to cease further action at an incident. Such a decision by one federal agency is not to preclude further action by the remaining agency or agencies. It is also possible that federal agencies may demobilize from the site while First/Tribal Nations, provincial/territorial/state, and/or local responses continue. When demobilization decisions are made, all relevant responding organizations are to be notified of the decision prior to the actual demobilization in accordance with the demobilization plan.

800 Post-incident review and report

EC and EPA are to conduct a Post Incident Debrief and prepare a report that documents the actions taken and any operational problems. It is critical that all organizations participate in the review and work together on developing the “Lessons Learned.” The CANUSWEST - SOUTH Working Groups should review the Post Incident Debrief and make changes to CANUSWEST - SOUTH to address any deficiencies discovered.

The Debrief Report should follow the format provided in TAB D - Generic Post Incident Debrief Format.

900 Plan distribution and amendments

901 Distribution

Copies of the Inland Plan, including the CANUSWEST - SOUTH Annex, are to be distributed to all levels of government and organizations in the RJRT, other local governments, and some major private sector facilities. In addition, copies are to be given to CBSA and U.S. CBP agencies for distribution to their respective customs/border officers.

They are also to be posted on the CANUSWEST, EPA Office of Emergency Management and EC Environmental Emergencies web sites.

902 Amendments

EC and EPA are to conduct a periodic review of the CANUSWEST - SOUTH Annex and issue amendments, as needed or otherwise appropriate. The review should be carried out in accordance with Appendix C of the Inland Plan – Guidelines for the Revision of the Inland Plan Regional Annexes.

1000 List of amendments

No.DatePage/SectionNature of Amendment/CommentAmended by
11998N/APrevious editionN/A
22014AllTo reflect operational reorganization within various Government of Canada institutions and update regional information, as required.EC and EPA

1100 Tabulations

Tab A: Emergency telephone numbers

Tab A1 Canada

Environment Canada
National Environmental Emergencies Centre (NEEC)

Telephone number: 1-866-283-2333 (24 hours/day)
Facsimile number: 1-514-496-1157
E-mail address: cnue_neec@ec.gc.ca

Tab B: Customs and immigration contacts

National Response Center (NRC)
Telephone number (from within the U.S.): 1-800-424-8802 (24 hr)
Telephone number (from Canada): 1-202-267-2675 (24 hr)
Facsimile number (from either country): 1-202-267-2165

EPA Region 10 - Washington and Idaho Border
Telephone number (from either country): 1-206-553-1263 (EPA Duty Officer 24 hr)
Facsimile number (from either country): 1-206-553-0175 (EPA Duty Officer – business hrs)

EPA Region 8 - Montana Border
Telephone number (from either country): 1-303-293-1788 (EPA Duty Officer 24 hr)
Telephone number (from within the U.S.): 1-800-227-8914 (EPA Duty Officer 24 hr)
Facsimile number (from either country): 1-303-312-6962

State of Washington - Washington/British Columbia Border
Telephone number (from either country): 1-800-258-5990 (WA Emergency Management Division (EMD) 24 hr)
Telephone number (from either country): 1-425-649-7000 (NW WA, Whatcom County 24 hr)
Telephone number (from either country): 1-509-575-2490 (Central WA, Okanogan County 24 hr)
Telephone number (from either country): 1-509-329-3400 (Eastern WA, Ferry, Stevens and Pend Oreille Counties 24 hr)

State of Idaho - Idaho/British Columbia Border
Telephone number (from within the U.S.): 1-800-632-8000 (Idaho State Comms 24 hr)
Telephone number (from Canada): 1-208-846-7610 (Idaho State Comms 24 hr)

State of Montana - Montana/British Columbia Border
Telephone number (from either country): 1-406-841-3911 (Montana Emergency Management (EM) 24 hr)
Telephone number (from either country): 1-406-431-0014 (Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) 24 hr)
Facsimile number: 1-406-444-1923 (Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ))

Tab B: Customs and immigration contacts - Canada

Tab B1 Canada’s CBSA telephone and facsimile numbers, and e-mail address for notifications of cross-border responses under the Inland Plan

All notifications of impending cross-border responses under the Inland Plan should be provided to CBSA’s Border Operations Centre (BOC) located at CBSA headquarters in Ottawa. CBSA’s BOC operates 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. BOC is responsible for notifying the specific CBSA port(s) of entry where the responders and their vehicles, equipment and supplies are to cross the Canada-U.S. border.

The contact coordinates for CBSA’s BOC are as follows:

Telephone Numbers: (613) 960-6001 (English) and (613) 960-6002 (French)
Facsimile Number: (613) 948-4848
Secure Facsimile Number: (613) 957-8599
E-mail address: BOC-COF@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

The Directory of CBSA Offices on the CBSA Internet site provides a current list of CBSA offices in British Columbia and information about their hours and services. Please disregard the instructions in the Directory of CBSA Offices about calling the Border Information Services (BIS) telephone number. For all matters related to workers and their vehicles, equipment and supplies crossing the border under the Inland Plan, please deal directly with the CBSA BOC at the contact coordinates provided above.

Tab B: Customs and immigration contacts – U.S.

Tab B2 United States border crossing stations

U.S. ports of entry (customs) and telephone numbers

All information obtained from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) website.
CBP Telephone numbers: (703) 526-4200 or (877) 227-5511

The corresponding Canada Customs Crossings and their affiliated towns, where appropriate, are provided in parentheses. All Canada Customs Crossings are located in British Columbia.

Washington
PortTelephoneFaxHours of Operation
Point Roberts (Boundary Bay/Tsawwassen)(360) 945-2314(360) 945-09200000hrs-2400hrs
Peace Arch/Blaine (Port of Douglas/Peace Arch)(360) 332-5771(360) 332-47010000hrs-2400hrs
Pacific Highway/Blaine (Pacific Highway/Truck Crossing)(360) 332-7237None0000hrs-2400hrs
Lynden (Aldergrove)(360) 354-2183(360) 354-27060800hrs-2400hrs
Sumas (Huntingdon/Abbotsford)(360) 988-2971(360) 988-63000000hrs-2400hrs
Nighthawk (Chopaka)(509) 476-2125(509) 476-37990900hrs-1700hrs
Orovill (Osoyoos)(509) 476-2955(509) 476-24650000hrs-2400hrs
Ferry (Midway)(509) 779-4655(509) 779-05050900hrs-1700hrs
Danville (Carson/Grand Forks)(509) 779-4862(509) 779-41140800hrs-2400hrs
Laurier (Cascade/Christina Lake)(509) 684-2100(509) 684-16080800hrs-2400hrs
Frontier (Paterson/Rossland)(509) 732-6215(509) 732-66430600hrs-2400hrs Weekdays
0000hrs-2400hrs Weekends
Boundary (Waneta/Trail)(509) 732-6674(509) 732-44700900hrs-1700hrs
Metaline Falls (Nelway/Salmo)(509) 446-4421(509) 446-20330800hrs-2400hrs
Idaho
PortTelephoneFaxHours of Operation
Porthill (Rykerts/Creston)(208) 267-5309(208) 267-10140700hrs-2300hrs
Eastport (Kingsgate/Yahk)(208) 267-3966(208) 267-41380000hrs-2400hrs
Montana
PortTelephoneFaxHours of Operation
Roosville (Roosville)(406) 889-3865(406) 889-50760000hrs-2400hrs

Tab C: First Nations – Canada

Tab C1 Canada

Tsawwassen First Nation
Building 131 N. Tsawwassen Dr.
Delta, BC V4M 4G2
(604) 943-2112 FAX (604) 943-9226
Chief Administrative Officer: Tom McCarthy
tmccarthy@tsawwassenfirstnation.com

Musqueam Band
6735 Salish Drive
Vancouver, BC V6N 4C4
(604) 263-3261 FAX (604) 263-4212
Public Works Manager: Norman Point
npoint@musqueam.bc.ca

Soowalie Band
4172 Soowahlie Road
Cultus Lake, BC V2R 4Y2
(604) 858-4631 FAX (604) 824-6751
Band Manager: Brenda Wallace
bandmanager@soowalie.ca

Semiahmoo First Nation
R.R. 7 16049 Beach Road
White Rock, BC V4B 5A8
(604) 536-3101 FAX (604) 536-6116
Band Manager: Joanne Charles
jcharles@semiahmoofirstnation.org

Sumas First Nation
3092 Sumas Mountain Road
Abbotsford, BC V3G 2J2
(604) 852-4040 FAX (604) 852-3834
Band Manager: Chris Wong
chris.wong@sumasfirstnation.com

Matsqui First Nation
31989 Harris Road
P.O. Box 10
Matsqui, BC V4X 3R2
(604) 826-6145 FAX (604) 826-7009
Chief: Alice McKay
matsquiband@shaw.ca

Lower Similkameen Indian Band
P.O. Box 100
Keremeos, BC VOX INO
(250) 499-5538 FAX (250) 499-5335
Chief: Joe Dennis
chief_dennis@LSIB.net

Osoyoos Indian Band
Site 25, Comp. 1, R.R. 3
Oliver, BC V0H 1T0
(250) 498-3444 FAX: (250) 498-6577
Chief/Band Manager: Clarence Louie
chief@oib.ca

Lower Kootenay Band
830 Simon Road
Creston, BC VOB 1G2
(250) 428-4428 FAX (250) 428-7686
Band Manager: Joe Pierre

Tobacco Plains Band
Box 76
Grasmere, BC VOB 1RO
(250) 887-3461 FAX (250) 887-3424
Band Administrator: Denise Birdstone
administrator@tobaccoplain.org

Chawathil
(604) 869-9994 FAX (604) 869-7614
Monica Florence
chawath@hughes.net

Cheam
(604) 794-7924 CELL (604) 793-8549
Chemaine Douglas or Leanne Quipp
Chemaine@shaw.com

Chehalis
(604) 796-2116 FAX (604) 796-3946
Harvey Paul
Harvey.Paul@chehalisband.com

Katzie
(604) 465-8961 FAX (604) 465-5949
Band Councillor: Jay Bailie
jay@katzie.ca

Kwantlen
(604) 888-2488 ext 225 CELL (604) 671-4221
Les Antone
les@kwantlenfn.ca
Alternate
(604) 888-2488 CELL (604) 897-2085
Carol Gabriel
carol@kwantlenfn.ca

Leq’a:mel (Lakahahmen)
(604) 826-7976 CELL (604) 217-0739
Kimberley Smith
kim@lakahahmen.ca
Alternate
(604) 826-7976
Alice Thompson
alice@lakahahmen.ca

Skowkale
(604) 792-0730 FAX (604) 792-1153
Jim Archie
jparchie24@yahoo.com

Skwah
(604) 792-9204 FAX (604) 792-1093
Chief: Chief Jack Mussell
skwahfirstnationmcombes@yahoo.ca

Squiala
(604) 792-8300 HOME (604) 701-6897
FAX (604) 792-4522
Vicky Jimmie
squiala6@shaw.ca

Tzeachten
(604) 858-3888 CELL (604) 819-5572
FAX (604) 858-3382
Band Administrator: Glenda Campbell
Glenda@Tzeachten.ca

Popkum, Skway Village, and Yakweakwioose
(604) 858-3366 FAX (604) 858-4790
Sto:lo Nation

Tab C: Tribal Nations – U.S.

Tab C2 United States

Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation
P.O. Box 150
Nespelum, WA 99155-0150
(509) 634-2200 FAX (509) 634-4116
Chairperson: Michael Finley
michael.finley@colvilletribes.com

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation
P.O. Box 278
Pablo, MT 59855-0278
(406) 675-2700 FAX (406) 675-2806
Chairperson: Ronald Trahan
ron.trahan@cskt.org

Kalispel Indian Community of the Kalispel Reservation
P.O. Box 39
Usk, WA 98180-0039
(509) 445-1147 FAX (509) 445-1705
Chairperson: Glen Nenema
dmolvik@kalispeltribe.com

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho
P.O. Box 1269
Bonners Ferry, ID 83805-1269
(208) 267-3519 FAX (208) 267-2960
Chairperson: Gary Aitken, Jr.
garyjr@kootenai.org

Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation
2665 Kwina Road
Bellingham, WA 98226-9298
(360) 384-1489 FAX (360) 380-6979
Chairperson: Timothy Ballew, II
timothyb@lummi-nsn.gov

Nooksack Indian Tribe of Washington
P.O. Box 157
Deming, WA 98244-0157
(360) 592-5176 FAX (360) 592-2125
Chairperson: Robert Kelly, Jr.
bkelly@nooksack-nsn.gov

Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
11404 Moorage Way
LaConner, WA 98257-0817
(360) 466-3163 FAX (360) 466-5309
Chairperson: M. Brian Cladoosby
bcladoosby@swinomish.nsn.gov

Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation
P.O. Box 100
Wellpinit, WA 99040-0100
(509) 458-6500 FAX (509) 458-6553
Chairperson: Rudy Peone
rudyp@spokanetribe.com

Tab D: Generic PPST incident debrief format

Objective:

  1. Review history of the polluting incident (the facts).
  2. Review strengths (what went well).
  3. Review weaknesses (what did not go so well).
  4. Review lessons learned.
  5. Review improvements needed for future.
  6. Implementation of recommended improvements.

History:

A brief chronology of events from the initial report of the polluting incident itself to the final demobilization of personnel and equipment.

What went well?

All agencies are to be requested to identify the things which went well during response operations. These comments can be recorded in point form on a flip chart. Debate and discussion at this point in time is to be discouraged.

What did not go so well?

All agencies are to be requested to identify the things which did not go so well during response operations. These comments can be recorded in point form on a flip chart. Debate and discussion at this point in time is to be discouraged.

What did we learn?

All agencies are to be requested to identify what they learned which could change the way they would do their job during the next incident. The comments can be recorded in point form on a flip chart.

What improvements are required?

In relation to identified strengths, weaknesses and lessons learned, all agencies are to be requested to identify areas where improvements should be made in terms of Management, Safety, Operations, Planning, Logistics, Media/Public Information and any other areas important to the response operations. Brainstorming or thought webs may be useful tools to encourage results. These comments can be recorded in point form on a flip chart.

Implementation:

The group is to prioritize areas for improvement and identify the appropriate agency for follow-up and implementation. Action items and completion dates are to be allocated to individuals/agencies or the item is to be deferred for further study.

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