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Reference List (1982 - Present)

2006

06-01 Hopkinson, C., L. Chasmer, K. Lim*, P. Treitz and I. Creed*. Towards a universal lidar canopy height indicator. Can. J. Remote Sensing 32, 139-152, 2006. (*Authors of correspondence).

Summary: The TLW was one of 5 sites chosen for a canopy height study using light detection and ranging (LIDAR). Four models were tested for accuracy in predicting tree height in forest canopies. The surveys were conducted between 2000 and 2005 using airborne laser terrain mapper (ALTM) sensors. First and last pulse returns (LSD) is shown to be a robust estimator of canopy height over a wide range of vegetation types and height classes.

06-02 Smokorowski, K.E., T.C. Pratt, W.G. Cole, L.J. McEachern and E.C. Mallory. Effects on periphyton and macroinvertebrates from removal of submerged wood in three Ontario lakes. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 63, 2038-2049, 2006.

Summary: Lower Batchawana, Wishart and Little Turkey Lake from the TLW were included in a study of northern Ontario lakes in which submerged wood was removed from the lakes to examine the effects on biota and plant life. The removal did not change lake chemistry or invoke a response by the invertebrate population, but removal of a productive biomass made the lakes less attractive to fish.

06-03 Monteith, S.S., J.M. Buttle*, P.W. Hazlett, F.D. Beall, R.G. Semkin and D.S. Jeffries. Paired-basin comparison of hydrological response in harvested and undisturbed hardwood forests during snowmelt in central Ontario: I. Streamflow, groundwater and flowpath behaviour. Hydrol. Process. 20, 1095-1116, 2006. (*Author of correspondence).

Summary: In a paired-basin study at the TLW, impacts of forest harvesting on groundwater hydrology were examined. Topographic indices were evaluated but inconsistently explained variations between the two basins. Harvesting appears to have increased melt rates and thus the volume of stream runoff via surface and near-surface pathways.

06-04 Monteith, S.S., J.M. Buttle*, P.W. Hazlett, F.D. Beall, R.G. Semkin and D.S. Jeffries. Paired-basin comparison of hydrological response in harvested and undisturbed hardwood forests during snowmelt in central Ontario: II. Streamflow sources and groundwater residence times. Hydrol. Process. 20, 1117-1136, 2006. (*Author of correspondence).

Summary: In a paired-basin study at the TLW, event-water flux and contribution to peak streamflow during snowmelt was greater in a harvested basin 4 years after harvesting, possibly reflecting increased daily melt rates following harvesting. Both isotopic (d18O) and geochemical (chloride) tracers gave comparable hydrograph separation results (hence the latter is a conservative tracer at the TLW). Groundwater residence times did not vary with depth between basins. Spatial variations such as conductivity and till thickness are also important in understanding groundwater behaviour after harvesting.

06-05 Braun, G.L. Specificity of substrate control on carbon dioxide flux from soils along a forest toposequence. MSc. Thesis, Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London. 114pp, 7 appendices, 2006.

Summary: The relationship between topography, soil CO2 flux, soil organic matter (SOM), and dissolved organic matter (DOM) was determined along a forested hillslope at the TLW. DOM quantity was found to be the key soil property controlling topographically variable CO2 flux. The relationship between DOM and CO2 was affected by hydrologic flow, with periods of high flow resulting in transport and lower DOM availability for microbial decomposition.

06-06 Lindsay, J.B. and I.F. Creed. Distinguishing actual and artefact depressions in digital elevation data. Computers and Geosciences 32, 1192–1204, doi:10.1016/j.cageo.2005.11.002, 2006.

Summary: Five potential approaches for distinguishing artefacts from actual depressions in DEMs are described in this paper; ground inspection, examining the source data, classification approaches, knowledge-based approaches, and modelling approaches. A comparison of the depression validation approaches for a catchment at the TLW showed that the modelling approach performed slightly better than the other methods. While being highly automated and applicable to all landscape types, this approach also explicitly handles DEM uncertainty.

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