Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund (LSGBCUF)

Table of Contents

1.  The Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund (LSGBCUF)

2.  Application Process

Figure 1. Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Boundary Map
Figure 2. Lake Simcoe Watershed Geographical Area
Figure 3. Nottawasaga Valley Geographical Area
Figure 4. South-Eastern Georgian Bay Geographical Area

Appendix 1: Letter of Intent Form (should not exceed two pages)
Appendix 2:  Detailed Proposal Application Form
Appendix 3: Examples of projects which might be funded through the Fund

 


1. The Lake Simcoe/ South–eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund

1.1 Purpose

The 2007 – 2012 Lake Simcoe Clean-up Fund (LSCUF) was successful in accelerating the adoption of beneficial management practices (BMPs) in the watershed, reducing phosphorous loads from urban and rural sources, and improving information and monitoring for decision making. 

The Government of Canada announced in Budget 2012 $29 million in funding to establish a renewed and expanded 2012-2017 Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-up Fund (herein called the Fund).  The geographic scope of the initiative will expand beyond the Lake Simcoe drainage basin, to include the adjacent drainage basins emptying into south-eastern Georgian Bay, including the watersheds and bays of Nottawasaga Valley, Severn Sound, and the targeted coastal regions west of Highway 400/69 north of Port Severn to the French River.  The extension and expansion of the program will reduce phosphorous inputs into Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay, improve water quality, and conserve critical aquatic habitat and associated species in these waters.

The following are the main objectives for projects within the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-up Fund:

a)    to improve environmental monitoring, assessment and scientific information required to measure the effectiveness of control strategies, and identify and assess alternative approaches to reducing phosphorous discharges;

b)    to conserve critical aquatic habitat and associated species through targeted aquatic habitat protection, restoration and creation projects;

c)    to reduce rural and urban non-point sources of phosphorous / nutrients, including implementation of BMPs for the management of soil, crops, livestock, and water use, septic systems and creating and rehabilitating wetlands and naturalizing watercourses to attenuate phosphorous discharges;

d)    to reduce discharge of phosphorous from point sources including sewage, combined sewer overflows and urban stormwater systems including support to development and testing of innovative approaches to manage urban stormwater and wastewater.

The purpose of the Letters of Intent stage is to invite project concepts that will contribute to the above objectives. The Letter of Intent stage is not mandatory. If you are uncertain as to whether your project is eligible you should submit a Letter of Intent.

Please note that once a Letter of Intent is deemed eligible by Environment Canada, the successful applicant will be invited to submit a detailed proposal by October 15, 2015. Those interested in submitting a detailed proposal, but did not submit a Letter of Intent are still eligible to submit a detailed proposal.


1.2 Administration of the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund

The Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Program is administered by Environment Canada’s Ontario Regional Director General’s Office and is modeled (with revisions) after the 2007-2012 Lake Simcoe Clean-Up Fund Program.

The project review process includes an assessment by a technical review committee and a Public Advisory Committee (PAC). 

The strategic priorities for the Fund are based on current science and will be reviewed periodically with stakeholders


1.3 Matching requirement and Fund limitations

The Fund will target a federal contribution of one-third, but in exceptional cases, will consider supporting up to two-thirds contribution of the total cost of a project.

Potential sources of matching funds and how collaborations are to be undertaken (cash, in-kind, contributions by the applicant, landowners or others involved in the project, use of equipment, expertise etc) must be described in the Letters of Intent.

Letters verifying the role and support provided by external collaborators will be requested in the detailed project proposal stage.


2. Application Process

2.1 Who can apply?

  • Landowners
  • Environmental groups
  • Community groups (e.g. youth and seniors groups, community-based associations, service clubs)
  • Small and medium sized business (e.g. developers, industries etc.)
  • Aboriginal organizations (e.g. First Nations Councils, Métis Associations)
  • Conservation Authorities
  • Stewardship Networks
  • Agriculture Associations
  • Non-governmental organizations
  • Educational institutions
  • Industry
  • Provincial/territorial/municipal governments

2.2 Priorities - What projects can be funded?

The call for Letters of Intent is issued to fund collaborative projects with the goal of reducing phosphorous inputs into Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay, improve water quality, and conserve critical aquatic habitat and associated species in these waters.  All projects must meet the intent of at least one of the priorities below:

a)    Research and monitoring to improve environmental information for decision making in South-eastern Georgian Bay and/or Lake Simcoe;

b)    Conservation (e.g. protection, restoration, creation) of critical aquatic habitats and their associated species populations;

c)    Reduction of rural and urban non-point source phosphorous / nutrients; and

d)    Reduction of point source phosphorous / nutrients.

Eligible Projects

  • Must be inside the geographic scope;
  • Support targeted (e.g., as per existing conservation plans and strategies) aquatic habitat protection, restoration, and creation projects in areas of known water quality problems (e.g., as per watershed report cards, management plans, and studies) and habitat degradation;
  • Support community stewardship projects to conserve aquatic habitat;
  • Support the implementation of Best  Management Practices that reduce urban and/or rural non-point sources of nutrients (e.g. surface runoff reduction, erosion control structures, vegetated buffers, cattle exclusion, alternative watering projects and phosphorous/nutrient management planning and recovery projects), assessment studies, and restoration of aquatic habitat impaired by excess phosphorous;
  • Support the promotion of septic system inspections, upgrades and replacements (systems must be 100m or less from a watercourse) in areas of known water quality problems;
  • Support the development and implementation of innovative technologies, techniques and demonstration projects that reduce nutrient loading from municipal wastewater and stormwater systems and other point source discharges;
  • Support the development of approaches to improve the efficiency and effluent quality of municipal sewage treatment plants (STPs); and communicate findings to decision makers;
  • Conduct water quality monitoring to measure phosphorous in the aquatic systems of South-eastern Georgian Bay including nearshore and tributary systems;
  • Conduct research and monitoring to assess conditions and causes contributing to increased phosphorous inputs into South-eastern Georgian Bay and nuisance and toxic algae growth to fill information gaps and aid in restoration and protection efforts; and
  • Conduct and support other research and monitoring necessary to guide the development and implementation of measures to reduce phosphorous/nutrient inputs and address low oxygen conditions and toxic/nuisance algae growth.

Projects can be multi-year in nature and those that are not accepted in this round may be re-submitted in subsequent funding rounds. Funding through this program ends March 31, 2017. There is an annual funding round each autumn. Environment Canada's fiscal year runs from April 1 to March 31. Examples of eligible projects are described in more detail in Appendix 3


2.3 What project costs are eligible?

Eligible Costs

  • Human Resources including salaries & benefits;
  • Operating expenses (e.g., travel and field costs, training, materials, supplies, production, translation, printing, office rent, and utilities);
  • Equipment purchase and lease (e.g. shovels, rentals of trucks/tractors/boats, office equipment, etc)
  • A reasonable share of overhead;
  • Management, professional and contract services (e.g. accounting, monitoring, communications, evaluation and audit, liability insurance costs, legal fees); and
  • Other Incremental costs.

2.4 What projects and activities cannot be funded (ineligible projects)?

  • Projects or activities already underway prior to funding approval;
  • Projects designed only to beautify an area;
  • The purchase or construction of infrastructure (e.g. buildings, roads, and bridges);
  • The purchase of land; and
  • Capital, operating costs or routine maintenance of municipal infrastructure projects (e.g. sewers, sewage treatment plants, stormwater ponds).

Please note this is not a complete list. If you are unsure about any of the examples listed above or the eligibility of your project and activities, please contact us for clarification.


2.5 Clean-Up Fund Proposed Time Table

 

Fall Submission

(for year  2016-2017)

 Round 3

Activities
September 27, 2015Deadline for Letters of Intent (not a mandatory stage)
October 15, 2015Deadline for Detailed Proposals 
March 31, 2016Anticipated Approval date 

 


2.6 How can I apply?

The Fund uses a two stage process for receiving applications to the Fund;

  1. Approval of Letters of Intent and request for detailed proposals and,
  2. Approval of detailed proposals, recommendation and approval for funding, and negotiation of funding Contribution Agreements.

Applicants are required to send:

The Letter of Intent stage (only required if you are uncertain of your project's eligibility under the Fund):

  • An electronic copy by email in Microsoft® Word or a compatible format

Refer to Appendix 1 for the Letter of Intent Form.

The Call for Detailed Proposals:

  • Two original signed, unbound paper copies in either of Canada’s official languages, and
  • An electronic copy by email in Microsoft® Word or a compatible format

Refer to Appendix 2 for the Detailed Proposal Application Form

Note: The project contact organization and name must be the recipient and manager of funds allocated through an Environment Canada Contribution Agreement throughout the duration of the project. Once the project has been approved, no changes to the initial recipient are possible.

to:

Steve Clement
Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund
Regional Director’s Office – Ontario Region
Environment Canada
4905 Dufferin St.
Toronto ON M3H 5T4
Tel: (416) 739-5908

ls-gbfund@ec.gc.ca     


2.7 Review Process

All Letters of Intent submitted will be reviewed by Environment Canada against the funding priorities, eligibility requirements, and program goals and objectives of the Fund.

Once a Letter of Intent is deemed eligible by Environment Canada, the successful applicant will be invited to submit a Detailed Proposal by October 15, 2015.  See Appendix 2 for the Detailed Proposal Application Form. If you do not submit a Letter of Intent you are still able to submit a detailed proposal.

Detailed project proposals will undergo a four-stage approvals process: (1) Administrative Review; a general screening by Environment Canada to ensure that applications meet program funding requirements and are complete; (2) Technical Review; by a multi-partite committee to determine whether the project meets one or more of the objectives of the program; is technically feasible and can provide tangible results; (3) Public Review; by way of a Public Advisory Committee to provide local knowledge and assistance for consideration in recommending projects for approval; and (4) to obtain final approval of recommended projects; at the Minister’s discretion.


2.8 Project Selection Criteria

The following criteria may be used in the assessment of projects:

  • Actions that will advance the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund priorities;
  • Measurable environmental benefits derived from the project;
  • Value for money;
  • On the ground implementation projects;
  • Amount of leveraged funding;
  • Extent of project collaboration, extent of community engagement and visibility;
  • Project location is within a priority watershed known to be significant source of phosphorous loading to Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay;
  • Technical feasibility;
  • Clarity and scope of objectives; and
  • Opportunities for technology and/or knowledge transfer, new and innovative technologies for storm water and nutrient management, cost-saving control technologies and rehabilitation methods.

2.9 Reference Materials

Project proponents are encouraged to go to the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund website for further information.

Internet English:  www.ec.gc.ca/doc/eau-water/simcoe_e.html

Internet French: www.ec.gc.ca/doc/eau-water/simcoe_f.html


Figure 1. Lake Simcoe / South-eastern Georgian Bay Boundary Map

Figure 1 is a map showing the geographical boundary for the program. This will be the watersheds of the Lake Simcoe Region including Lake Couchiching and the Severn River west to Port Severn. It also includes the watersheds and bays of the Nottawasaga Valley, Severn Sound, and the targeted coastal regions which extend west of Highway 400/69 and from Port Severn in the South, to the French River in the North, in recognition that this region contributes directly to the problem of phosphorous and nutrients in Georgian Bay.

Map: Watershed and Program boundaries for the Lake Simcoe/ South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund. December 2012.


Lake Simcoe Watershed Geographical Area

Figure 2 is a map showing the Lake Simcoe region watershed. This watershed is a major recreational area situated North of Toronto. The lake is known for its recreational fishery and generates a $200 million annual economic contribution to the area’s tourism and recreational industries. The region also supports agricultural activities, and has recently undergone increased urban development. Lake Simcoe discharges into Georgian Bay through Lake Couchiching and the Severn River. The lake is approximately 30 km long and 25 km wide, has an area of 722 km² and the watershed has total land and water surface area of 3,576 km². Thirty-five rivers flow, generally north, into the lake. The lake provides water for 6 municipalities and assimilates municipal waste from 14 treatment facilities.

Map: Watershed boundary for the Lake Simcoe watershed.  December 2012.


Figure 3. Nottawasaga Valley Geographical Area

Figure 3 is a map showing the Nottawasaga Valley watershed. This watershed is located in south-central Ontario and covers an area of 3,600 km². The Niagara Escarpment, Oak Ridges Moraine and Simcoe Uplands represent the height of land along the edges of this bowl-shaped watershed. The northwestern portion of the watershed drains into Georgian Bay at Collingwood via the Nottawasaga River while the northern portions of Springwater and Oro-Medonte Townships (Severn Sound Headwaters) drain northward toward Severn Sound. Agriculture is the dominant land use. Collingwood and Wasaga Beach are the major coastal communities and attract millions of dollars in tourism and recreational activities annually. The watershed contains approximately 2,636 hectares of coastal areas, 58,475 hectares of stream systems, 1,310 hectares of lakes and 24,165 hectares of wetlands.

Map: Watershed boundary for the Nottawasaga Valley Watershed. December 2012.


Figure 4.  South-eastern Georgian Bay Geographical Area

Figure 4 is a map showing the geographical boundary for South-eastern Georgian Bay. This is comprised of three sections: Lake Couchiching, Severn Sound and the coastal region of Georgian Bay. First, Lake Couchiching is connected to the northern end of Lake Simcoe. The region surrounding Lake Couchiching is a major recreational area north of Toronto. The lake is known for its recreational fishery due to its access to Lake Simcoe. The region supports agricultural activities, and has recently undergone increased urban development. Lake Couchiching is connected to Georgian Bay through the 30 km long Severn River portion of the Trent-Severn Waterway. The lake is approximately 16 km long and 5 km wide, and has a water surface area of 33.75 km². Second, Severn Sound is a group of bays covering an area of approximately 130 km² and is located in south-eastern Georgian Bay, Lake Huron. The contact between the Precambrian shield and the sedimentary bedrock with varying overburden runs down the middle of the Sound. The basin is a complex of sheltered to exposed bays ranging from 2 to 4 meters deep in the eastern end to a 43 meters deep basin off the northern end of Beausoleil Island where the Sound meets Georgian Bay. The Severn Sound watershed encompasses a combination of small urban and rural areas with a permanent population of approximately 110,000 people and a seasonal population of 300,000 people. The small urban areas are served by nine municipal sewage plants with extensive areas on private sewage systems. Municipal water supplies include thirty two groundwater systems and two surface water systems. Finally, the coastal region between Port Severn and the French River (west of Highway 400/69) is comprised of Precambrian Shield with little soil overburden, open waters, sheltered bays, coastal wetlands, bedrock shores, sand and cobble beaches and other distinct habitat types supporting rare species and fish communities. The town of Parry Sound is the largest community on the coast. Several coastal areas are popular cottage destinations and have developed into major open water and service areas for a growing cottage community due mostly to easy road access. As a result, these areas have seen a large amount of shoreline development, tourist resorts, marinas, and an expanding year-round resident population. Water quality monitoring results for some of these areas identified high phosphorous levels in surface waters along with reduced water clarity, dissolved oxygen depletion in deepwater zones, heavy plankton blooms and blue-green algae occurrences that have resulted in the issuance of health advisories.

Map: Program boundary for the coastal region of South-eastern Georgian Bay.  December 2012.


Appendix 1: Lake Simcoe / South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund - Letter of Intent Form (should not exceed two pages)

NOT A MANDATORY STEP. If you are uncertain of your project's eligibility you should submit a Letter of Intent rather than investing the time of submitting a complete application.

Letter of Intent Form

Section NameRequired Information
Recipient InformationLegal name of recipient
Project TitleName of project.
Project Team

Name of the project lead/project manager for the project, organization, mailing address, telephone, email, and fax number.

If the primary contact is different from the project lead, enter it here.
Note: The project contact organization and name must be the recipient and manager of funds allocated through an Environment Canada Contribution Agreement throughout the duration of the project. Once the project has been approved, no changes to the initial recipient are possible.

Project DescriptionPlease include a description of the project’s overall objective (what, where, when, why, size and scope); is there a knowledge transfer component; methods utilized; expected benefits and measures of success (reduction in phosphorous loading, innovative programs/ technologies, etc.).
Additional Contributions (cash, in-kind)Enter the name(s) of tentative or confirmed contributors and their involvement in the project.
Project Budget

Enter estimated total project budget per funding year (April 1 - March 31), including maximum indirect costs (overhead).

For matching funding, indicate whether the funds are cash or in-kind, and whether the funding is requested or confirmed.

Clearly identify total funding requested from the Fund and the matching funds provided by other contributors.

The LSGBCUF will target a federal contribution of 1/3, but in exceptional cases will consider supporting up to 2/3 contribution of the total cost of a project. Ensure requested project costs are eligible (see section 2.3 of this call letter).

Timeframe/Project Duration

Enter expected start date and completion date.  April 1, 2016 is the earliest start date.

Projects cannot go beyond March 31, 2017.

Project LocationEnter location of the project by watershed and county name.
Relationship of Project to LSGB CUF funding prioritiesIdentify which LSGB CUF funding priority the proposed project supports and why. (See Appendix 3 for funding priority list).
Signed by(name)

Top of Page

Appendix 2:  Detailed Proposal Application Form

All prospective proponents are required to fill out the application form. The form provides step-by-step instructions on how to complete the application. 

Please email LS-GBfund@ec.gc.ca for a copy of the current application form.

Top of Page

Appendix 3: Examples of projects which might be funded

This table shows examples of various projects, which would be meet the criteria required for funding under the Lake Simcoe / South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund. It also showcases the four areas in which the funds mandate is driven. These examples are not the only acceptable types of projects, but are the most common project proposals.

Examples of projects which might be funded
FUNDING PRIORITYPOTENTIAL PROJECTS
Research and monitoring to improve environmental information for decision-making
  • Water quality monitoring (phosphorous and other chemical parameters) in South-eastern Georgian Bay and associated tributaries.
  • Conduct research and monitoring to assess conditions contributing to increased phosphorous inputs into South-eastern Georgian Bay and nuisance and toxic algae growth to fill information gaps and aid in restoration and protection efforts.
  • Conduct and support other research and monitoring necessary to guide the development and implementation of measures to reduce phosphorous /nutrient inputs and address low oxygen conditions and toxic/nuisance algae growth.
Conservation (e.g. protection, restoration, creation) of critical aquatic habitat and their associated species populations
  • Support targeted (e.g., as per existing conservation / management plans and strategies) aquatic habitat protection, restoration and creation projects in areas of known water quality problems (e.g., as per watershed report cards, management plans, and studies) and habitat degradation.
  • Support community stewardship projects to conserve aquatic habitat.

 

Reduction of rural and urban non-point source phosphorous / nutrients
  • Support the implementation of Best Management Practices that reduce urban and/or rural non-point sources of nutrients (e.g. surface runoff reduction, erosion control structures, vegetated buffers, cattle exclusion, alternative watering projects and phosphorous/nutrient management planning and recovery projects), assessment studies, and restoration of aquatic habitat impaired by excess phosphorous.
  • Support the promotion of septic system inspections, upgrades and replacements in areas of known water quality problems.
Reduction of point sources of phosphorous /nutrients
  • Support the development and implementation of innovative technologies, techniques and demonstration projects that reduce nutrient loading from municipal wastewater and stormwater systems and other point source discharges.
  • Support the development of approaches to improve the efficiency and effluent quality of municipal sewage treatments plants; and communicate findings to decision makers.

 

Date modified: