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2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview


Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister:  The Honourable Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: Michael Martin

Ministerial Portfolio: Environment and Climate Change Canada

Enabling Instruments:

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1971

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Organizational Context

Raison d’être

Environment and Climate Change Canada is the lead federal department for a wide range of environmental and climate change issues. It plays a stewardship role in achieving and maintaining a clean environment by minimizing threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution; a safe environment by equipping Canadians to make informed decisions on weather, water and climate conditions; and a sustainable environment by conserving and restoring Canada’s natural environment. The Department’s program focus reflects that a clean environment and a strong economy go hand in hand.

Four Cornerstones of our clean, safe and sustainable environment mandate: science, collaboration on climate change, regulation and service to Canadians

The four cornerstones provide a strong foundation for all our work. Together, they enable us to translate our raison d’être and Government of Canada priorities and principles into action, and they permeate and guide the programs and activities we pursue to achieve concrete results for Canadians.

We conduct and use science to inform decisions and actions. Science enables us to achieve our mandate and meet our legislative obligations–it points to where we need to take action. Robust scientific and technical capacity is key to all aspects of our work, from regulatory programs to protect wildlife and the environment, to initiatives that prevent and control pollution and support cleaner air for Canadians, to weather and environmental services we deliver, and to consultations with stakeholders on environmental assessments. We openly share data with and disseminate it to our federal, provincial, territorial and international partners to broaden capacity for achieving sound environmental and climate goals for Canadians.

We collaborate with partners and stakeholders to address climate change. Collaboration with diverse domestic and international partners and stakeholders is central to our leadership role to address environmental and climate change challenges, most notably through the establishment of a pan-Canadian Framework to address climate change. Through these strategic partnerships, we work to reduce air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions and manage precious water and ecosystem resources, drawing on expertise to inform major resource development projects, and engaging the public in activities such as environmental assessments. We will collaborate with government, business and civil society leaders around the world to work towards a low-carbon, climate-resilient global economy.

We develop, promote and enforce compliance with regulatory regimes to protect Canadians and their environment. Working within the broader federal regulatory system, Environment and Climate Change Canada establishes, promotes compliance with and enforces regulations that protect Canadians and their environment. Our regulatory regime is informed by broad-based consultation and by science and provides effective and efficient tools to achieve environment and climate change goals and targets while avoiding duplication with other partners, including Canada’s provinces and territories.

We serve Canadians where they live. Our workforce is strategically located across the country, with almost two-thirds of employees working in communities outside the National Capital Region. We work in field offices, laboratories, National Wildlife Areas and weather stations in every province and territory. Environment and Climate Change Canada employees bring a diverse perspective to programs and policies that support a clean, safe and sustainable environment in homes, businesses and communities across Canada.

In addition, over the next two years, Environment and Climate Change Canada will be supporting government-wide efforts to celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017. We will actively collaborate with Parks Canada to engage Canadians and inspire broad awareness of the importance of conserving and protecting our land, water and wildlife.

Responsibilities

A number of acts and regulations provide the Department with its mandate and allow it to carry out its programs. Under the Department of the Environment Act, the powers, duties and functions of the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change extend to matters such as:

  • the preservation and enhancement of the quality of the natural environment, including water, air and soil quality, and the coordination of the relevant policies and programs of the Government of Canada;
  • renewable resources, including migratory birds and other non-domestic flora and fauna; and
  • meteorology.

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change has primary responsibility for and carries out the departmental mandate through a number of other acts and regulations, such as the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999); the pollution prevention provisions of the Fisheries Act; the Federal Sustainable Development Act; the Species at Risk Act; the International River Improvement Act; the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994; the Canadian Wildlife Act; and the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act.

The Department is a key partner of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and Parks Canada, which are both within the ministerial portfolio.

In addition, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change has secondary or shared responsibility for the successful execution of other federal departments’ mandates, including the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act (Transport Canada, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, and Natural Resources Canada); the Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Natural Resources Canada), and the Emergency Management Act (Public Safety Canada).

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Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

Environment and Climate Change Canada fulfills its mandate by promoting three Strategic Outcomes, each contributing to the Government of Canada Outcome of a clean and healthy environment. The Department’s Strategic Outcomes and corresponding Program Alignment Architecture, including its Internal Services for 2016–17, are shown below.

1. Strategic Outcome: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

  • 1.1 Program: Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat
    • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: Biodiversity Policy and Priorities
    • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Species at Risk
    • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: Migratory Birds
    • 1.1.4 Sub-Program: Habitat Conservation Partnerships
    • 1.1.5 Sub-Program: Protected Areas
  • 1.2 Program: Water Resources
    • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health
    • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Water Resource Management and Use
    • 1.2.3 Sub-Program: Hydrometric Services
  • 1.3 Program: Sustainable Ecosystems
    • 1.3.1 Sub-Program: Sustainability Reporting and Indicators
    • 1.3.2 Sub-Program: Ecosystem and Environmental Assessments and Monitoring
    • 1.3.3 Sub-Program: Community Engagement
      • 1.3.3.1 Sub-Sub-Program: EcoAction Community Funding
      • 1.3.3.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Environmental Damages Fund
      • 1.3.3.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Environmental Youth Employment
    • 1.3.4 Sub-Program: Great Lakes
    • 1.3.5 Sub-Program: St. Lawrence
    • 1.3.6 Sub-Program: Lake Simcoe / South-eastern Georgian Bay
    • 1.3.7 Sub-Program: Lake Winnipeg
    • 1.3.8 Sub-Program: Ecosystems Partnerships
  • 1.4 Program: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife

2. Strategic Outcome: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions

  • 2.1 Program: Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians
    • 2.1.1 Sub-Program: Weather and Environmental Observations, Forecasts and Warnings
    • 2.1.2 Sub-Program: Health-related Meteorological Information
    • 2.1.3 Sub-Program: Climate Information, Predictions and Tools
  • 2.2 Program: Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users
    • 2.2.1 Sub-Program: Meteorological Services in Support of Air Navigation
    • 2.2.2 Sub-Program: Meteorological and Ice Services in Support of Marine Navigation
    • 2.2.3 Sub-Program: Meteorological Services in Support of Military Operations

3. Strategic Outcome: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

  • 3.1 Program: Substances and Waste Management
    • 3.1.1 Sub-Program: Substances Management
    • 3.1.2 Sub-Program: Effluent Management
    • 3.1.3 Sub-Program: Marine Pollution
    • 3.1.4 Sub-Program: Environmental Emergencies
    • 3.1.5 Sub-Program: Contaminated Sites
  • 3.2 Program: Climate Change and Clean Air
    • 3.2.1 Sub-Program: Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program
      • 3.2.1.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Industrial Sector Emissions
      • 3.2.1.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Transportation Sector Emissions
    • 3.2.2 Sub-Program: International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships
    • 3.2.3 Sub-Program: Environmental Technology
  • 3.3 Program: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution

Internal Services

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Organizational Priorities

Priority 1: A Clean Environment
Description
Manage substances and waste, and reduce pollution and emissions that directly or indirectly harm human health or the environment.
Priority TypeTable note a
Ongoing
Links to Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.
Why this is a priority
Climate change is one of the greatest threats of our time and indisputable science points to changes on Earth due to human activity that will continue to have profound impacts on human health and the environment. Canada’s domestic and international commitments require us to reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Reductions in emissions of air pollutants, short-lived climate pollutants and GHG benefit both climate and air quality. In addition, harmful substances released into the environment and products that contain toxic substances threaten the health of Canadians and their environment. The application of sound science and clean technologies is vital to address these threats effectively.

 

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned InitiativesStart DateEnd DateLink to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
The Department will work with provinces, territories and Indigenous partners to establish a pan-Canadian Framework to address climate change.2015–16Ongoing

3.2.1.1 Industrial Sector Emissions

3.2.1.2 Transportation Sector Emissions

3.2.3 Environmental Technology

The Department will work collaboratively with the United States and Mexico, as well as with other government departments to develop an ambitious North American clean energy and environment agreement.

The Department will establish and pursue international commitments, with emphasis on timely and efficient implementation of the Paris Agreement, that align with our domestic plans and contribute to a clean environment globally, as well as partnerships and climate finance to assist vulnerable countries transition to low carbon economies.

2015–16Ongoing

3.1.1 Substances Management

3.2.2 International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships

Environment and Climate Change Canada will continue to work with provinces and territories to set strong air quality standards (AQS), implement the Air Quality Management System (AQMS), and provide incentives for investments that lead to cleaner air and healthier communities.

Ongoing (AQS)

Ongoing (AQMS)

2015–16 (cleaner air)

Ongoing

3.2.1.1 Industrial Sector Emissions

3.2.1.2 Transportation Sector Emissions

Through our continued implementation of the Chemicals Management Plan and the pollution prevention provisions of the Fisheries Act, environmental risks posed by harmful chemicals and substances in the air, in water and on land will be assessed, and measures to prevent or manage those risks will be developed and implemented as appropriate.OngoingOngoing

3.1.1 Substances Management

3.1.2 Effluent Management

Priority 2: A Safe Environment
Description
Provide Canadians with timely high-quality information on immediate and long-term environmental conditions.
Priority Type
Ongoing
Links to Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.
Why this is a priority
Canadians rely on accurate and timely weather and environmental services from Environment and Climate Change Canada to plan their daily activities and to make decisions about their safety. The same information is central to maintaining a healthy economy, particularly in sectors such as agriculture, resource development, transportation, tourism and recreation.
Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned InitiativesStart DateEnd DateLink to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture

Environment and Climate Change Canada will deliver science-based weather and environmental services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to inform the decisions of individuals, families and an array of economic sectors.

The Department will pursue up-to-date research, technology and systems that support the collection and communication of current conditions and forecasts for the public and for the aviation, marine and defence sectors. For example, we will continue to provide 24/7 meteorological, ocean and ice information vital to the operations of the Canadian Armed Forces, Canadian Coast Guard, and other federal users of weather and environmental information.

OngoingOngoing

2.1.1 Weather and Environmental Observations, Forecasts and Warnings

2.1.2 Health-related Meteorological Information

2.2.1 Meteorological Services in Support of Air Navigation

2.2.2 Meteorological and Ice Services in Support on Marine Navigation

2.2.3 Meteorological Services in Support of Military Operations

To protect Canadians from the challenges of climate change, the Department will continue to undertake activities such as forecasting severe weather events and seasonal predictions, and to deliver Canada’s national climate modelling program. We will work to make better science-based predictions of severe weather and climate-related events to inform provinces, territories and communities in preparing for and responding to such events. As the federal lead for adaptation, ECCC will also continue to advance the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework, which sets direction on adaptation at a high level.OngoingOngoing

2.1.1 Weather and Environmental Observations, Forecasts and Warnings

2.1.3 Climate Information, Predictions and Tools

3.1.4 Environmental Emergencies

Environment and Climate Change Canada will provide environmental science and monitoring to support, for example, the examination of the implications of climate change.OngoingOngoing

2.1.3 Climate Information, Predictions and Tools

 

Priority 3: A Sustainable Environment
Description
Work to conserve and protect land, water and biodiversity.
Priority Type
Ongoing
Links to Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.
Why this is a priority
Canada is a country with a rich natural environment that supports a diversity of plant and animal species. Taking a leadership role in the protection and conservation of these resources for the benefit of Canadians today and into the future is a core component of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s stewardship role.
Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned InitiativesStart DateEnd DateLink to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
Sound science and solid partnerships will provide the foundation to enhance protection of Canada’s endangered species, complete robust species-at-risk (SAR) recovery plans in a timely way, manage and expand National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird (MB) Sanctuaries and increase the proportion of Canada’s marine and coastal areas that are protected. Science will also inform the Department’s work with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency to restore robust oversight and thorough environmental assessments (EA).

Ongoing (Protected Areas)

Ongoing
(MB)

Ongoing
(SAR)

2015–16
(EAs)

Ongoing

1.1.2 Species at Risk

1.1.5 Protected Areas

1.3.2 Ecosystem and Environmental Assessments and Monitoring

The Department will protect Canada’s water resources and target key areas, including the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence River Basin, the Lake Winnipeg Basin, the Atlantic ecosystems, and other water ecosystems, by engaging stakeholders and through effective science, monitoring, regulatory tools and watershed protection.OngoingOngoing

1.2.1 Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health

1.2.2 Water Resource Management and Use

1.2.3 Hydrometric Services

1.3.4 Great Lakes

1.3.5 St. Lawrence

1.3.6 Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay

1.3.7 Lake Winnipeg

1.3.8 Ecosystems Partnerships

3.1.2 Effluent Management

Environment and Climate Change Canada will monitor ecosystems and plant and animal species, and support various domestic and international partners in the conservation of important ecologically sensitive habitats by providing the necessary financial and technical assistance.OngoingOngoing1.1.4 Habitat Conservation Partnerships
The Department will continue to develop and enforce a strong regulatory regime, including promoting compliance to protect wildlife and prevent pollution.OngoingOngoing

1.4 Compliance, Promotion and Enforcement - Wildlife

3.3 Compliance, Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution

Priority 4: Management Priority

Description
Enhance service delivery to support the Department’s mandate.
Priority Type
Ongoing
Links to all Strategic Outcomes
Why this is a priority
Environment and Climate Change Canada will continue its work to ensure that internal services, including human and financial resources management, communication, information management and technology, are aligned to best support and enable the achievement of results.
Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned InitiativesStart DateEnd DateLink to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
Environment and Climate Change Canada will leverage social media and other forms of communication to provide Canadians with timely information relating to our mandate and key priorities.2015–16OngoingLinks to all PAA Programs
We will support Canada’s Open Government Agenda by ensuring that strong systems are in place to gather, collect, communicate and disseminate information, and work to strengthen data management and recordkeeping capacities.OngoingOngoingLinks to all PAA Programs
With a strong focus on results, the Department will put in place mechanisms for robust performance measurement to support decision‑making, reporting and strategic investment.OngoingOngoingLinks to all PAA Programs
The Department will adopt strategic and targeted actions to support employees and develop expertise (including scientific and technical) to achieve concrete results in accordance with our mandate.OngoingOngoingLinks to all PAA Programs

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Minister’s mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada’s Website.

Risk Analysis

Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has identified certain risks that may impact the achievement of the Department’s mandate, strategic outcomes and priorities. These risks are driven by varying aspects, some of which are changes in policy and strategic direction, potential environmental hazards and emergencies, the evolution of collaboration and partnerships with various stakeholders both at home and internationally, together with the ever-changing social, economic and environmental landscape and the need to advance science and technology. The Department has identified actions it could take to mitigate these risks and will monitor, review and respond to these and any potential emerging risks, as appropriate.

Key Risks
RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program Alignment Architecture
Achieving progress on our “Clean” stewardship mandate Strategic Outcome 3
Many of the measures required to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are not under the responsibility of ECCC or the Government of Canada more generally.

Through its leadership and collaboration with partners and stakeholders, ECCC will work with its provincial, territorial, regional and international partners to align regional commitments and actions. In particular, ECCC will work with provinces and territories to establish a pan-Canadian Framework to address climate change.

Environment and Climate Change Canada will continue to work collaboratively under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and bilaterally with key partners to advance work for an effective and timely implementation of the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

 
Achieving progress on our “Safe” stewardship mandate Strategic Outcome 2
Failure of ECCC’s facility infrastructure and Information Technology systems may impede the Department’s capacity to monitor and predict severe weather and other programs to Canadians.

In order to maintain capacity to predict severe weather and protect the health and safety of Canadians and the economy, particularly in sectors such as agriculture, resource development, transportation, tourism and recreation, ECCC works with its partners so that key facility and IT systems are maintained and any necessary planned outages are carefully scheduled so that service disruption is minimized.

As part of its business continuity planning, ECCC also conducts regular risk analysis to inform priority setting and decision making.

 
Achieving progress on our “Sustainable” stewardship mandate Strategic Outcome 1
Population, industrial and economic growth may continue to put stress on the environment.

To mitigate potential harm to air quality, freshwater and terrestrial habitat and species ECCC, together with our provincial, territorial, and Indigenous partners will: use sound scientific evidence; promote compliance; enforce regulations; and, use processes to monitor, take or recommend actions to address this challenge.

ECCC will strengthen its activities in the following areas: education, geo-mapping, watershed, marine and coastal protection, species at risk recovery plans, and expansion of habitats and sanctuaries.

 

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Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
902,089,198902,089,198871,955,579815,884,001

*All figures throughout this document are net of respendable revenues.

Environment and Climate Change Canada's planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support departmental Strategic Outcomes and Programs. The decrease from 2016–17 to 2017–18 in planned spending is mainly due to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2017 for initiatives such as the Lake Simcoe Initiative, the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative, the completion of initiatives such as Federal Infrastructure and Single Windows as well as decreased requirements for Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) for the Sustainable Development Technology Fund, partially offset by increased funding for the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Projects. The decrease in planned spending from 2017–18 to 2018–19 is mainly due to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2018 for initiatives such as the Species at Risk program as well as the reduction in funding requirements for the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Projects, the Meteorological Service of Canada, the National Conservation Plan and SDTC for the Sustainable Development Technology Fund.

ECCC will seek ongoing funding for priority initiatives. Funding requests for such initiatives are subject to government decisions, and the outcomes will be reflected in future budget exercise and Estimates documents.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents--[FTEs])*
2016–172017–182018–19
5,6925,5235,330

*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures. The FTE numbers throughout this document include students.

One FTE equals one person working a 37.5-hour work week full-time for the entire year, or any number of part-time employees whose combined hours of work equal one FTE. An average salary was used to calculate FTEs based on planned salary spending for the 2016–17, 2017–18 and 2018–19 fiscal years. Based on this calculation, Environment and Climate Change Canada plans to use 5,692 FTEs in 2016–17, with decreases of FTE utilization, linked to decreases in planned spending, in 2017–18 and 2018–19, as shown in the above table.

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Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations
Programs2013-14
Expenditures
2014-15
Expenditures
2015-16
Forecast Spending
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Program 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat120,519,001140,408,483135,387,514137,912,691137,912,691133,903,800120,985,239
Program 1.2
Water Resources
100,322,33792,453,05895,770,86280,035,02380,035,02382,145,07682,198,388
Program 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems70,727,19472,619,88890,782,41388,026,73988,026,73982,431,06265,531,319
Program 1.4 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement18,208,95617,058,49716,115,51016,652,42916,652,42916,367,54416,303,290
Strategic Outcome 1 Subtotal309,777,488322,539,926338,056,299322,626,882322,626,882314,847,482285,018,236
Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions
Programs2013-14
Expenditures
2014-15
Expenditures
2015-16
Forecast Spending
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Program 2.1 Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians182,818,981174,493,294201,585,501174,382,678174,382,678169,118,896149,022,208
Program 2.2 Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users26,618,14425,886,65715,562,71119,267,38419,267,38418,998,85119,027,920
Strategic Outcome 2 Subtotal209,437,125200,379,951217,148,212193,650,062193,650,062188,117,747168,050,128
Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized
Programs2013-14
Expenditures
2014-15
Expenditures
2015-16
Forecast Spending
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Program 3.1 Substances and Waste Management84,616,66686,779,80585,149,09974,912,98574,912,98568,461,07966,263,946
Program 3.2
Climate Change and Clean Air
125,118,027121,061,134123,045,01997,030,44997,030,44987,789,68284,659,353
Program 3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution44,661,87642,309,86637,560,22234,672,52834,672,52834,487,23134,914,402
Strategic Outcome 3 Subtotal254,396,569250,150,805245,754,340206,615,962206,615,962190,737,992185,837,701
Internal Services
 2013-14
Expenditures
2014-15
Expenditures
2015-16
Forecast Spending
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Internal Services Subtotal205,338,366203,115,955182,351,884179,196,292179,196,292178,252,358176,977,936
 
Totals2013-14
Expenditures
2014-15
Expenditures
2015-16
Forecast Spending
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome 1309,777,488322,539,926338,056,299322,626,882322,626,882314,847,482285,018,236
Strategic Outcome 2209,437,125200,379,951217,148,212193,650,062193,650,062188,117,747168,050,128
Strategic Outcome 3254,396,569250,150,805245,754,340206,615,962206,615,962190,737,992185,837,701
Internal Services205,338,366203,115,955182,351,884179,196,292179,196,292178,252,358176,977,936
Total978,949,548976,186,637983,310,735902,089,198902,089,198871,955,579815,884,002

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

The variance between the 2015–16 forecast spending and the 2016–17 planned spending is mainly due to the decrease in funding requirements for the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Projects and to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2016 for initiatives such as the Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative, the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda and West Coast Energy Development. The decrease from 2016–17 to 2017–18 in planned spending is primarily due to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2017 for initiatives such as the Lake Simcoe Initiative and the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative. The decrease from 2017–18 to 2018–19 in planned spending is mainly attributable to the decrease in funding requirement for the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Projects and to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2018 for initiatives such as the Species at Risk program.

Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

The variance between the 2015–16 forecast spending and the 2016–17 planned spending is mainly due to the decrease in funding for the Meteorological Service of Canada as well as the funding that will expire on March 31, 2016 for initiatives such as the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda. The decrease from 2016–17 to 2017–18 in planned spending is primarily due to the completion of initiatives such as Federal Infrastructure, offset by the funding increase for the Meteorological Service of Canada. The decrease from 2017–18 to 2018–19 in planned spending is mainly attributable to the decrease in funding for the Meteorological Service of Canada.

Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

The variance between the 2015–16 forecast spending and the 2016–17 planned spending is mainly due to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2016 for initiatives such as the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda, offset by the increase in funding for SDTC for the Sustainable Development Technology Fund. The decrease from 2016–17 to 2017–18 in planned spending is primarily due to the decrease in funding for the World Class Oil Spills Regime, SDTC for the Sustainable Development Technology Fund, as well as the completion of the Single Windows Initiative. The decrease from 2017–18 to 2018–19 in planned spending is mainly attributable to the decrease in funding for SDTC for the Sustainable Development Technology Fund.

Internal Services

The variance between the 2015–16 forecast spending and the 2016–17 planned spending is mainly due to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2016. The decrease from 2016–17 to 2017–18 in planned spending is primarily due to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2017 for initiatives such as the Lake Simcoe Initiative, the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative and the completion of the Single Windows Initiative. The decrease from 2017–18 to 2018–19 in planned spending is mainly attributable to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2018 for initiatives such as the Species at Risk program and the World Class Oil Spills Regime.

See the previous Departmental Performance Report (DPR) for additional details on year-over-year variances between 2013–14 and 2014–15 expenditures.

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Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016–17 Planned Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations
ProgramSpending AreaGovernment of Canada Outcome2016–17
Planned Spending
Program 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and HabitatEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment137,912,691
Program 1.2 Water ResourcesEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment80,035,023
Program 1.3 Sustainable EcosystemsEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment88,026,739
Program 1.4 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – WildlifeEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment16,652,429
Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions
ProgramSpending AreaGovernment of Canada Outcome2016–17
Planned Spending
Program 2.1 Weather and Environmental Services for CanadiansEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment174,382,678
Program 2.2 Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted UsersEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment19,267,384
Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized
ProgramSpending AreaGovernment of Canada Outcome2016–17
Planned Spending
Program 3.1 Substances and Waste ManagementEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment74,912,985
Program 3.2 Climate Change and Clean AirEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment97,030,449
Program 3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – PollutionEconomic AffairsA clean and healthy environment34,672,528
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending AreaTotal Planned Spending
Economic Affairs722,892,906
Social Affairs0
International Affairs0
Government Affairs0

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Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

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Departmental Spending (in dollars)
Fiscal YearSunset Programs
(Anticipated)
StatutoryVotedTotal
2013–140105,709,346873,240,202978,949,548
2014–150100,888,122875,298,515976,186,637
2015–16088.404,150894,906,585983,310,735
2016–17110,800,51081,932,846820,156,3521,012,889,708
2017–18122,481,45480,846,602791,108,977994,437,033
2018–19135,114,49779,230,382736,653,619950,998,498

Note: Environment and Climate Change Canada will seek ongoing funding for priority initiatives. Funding requests for such initiatives are subject to government decisions and will be reflected in future budget exercise and Estimates documents.

For fiscal years 2013–14 and 2014–15, the amounts shown represent the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts. For fiscal year 2015–16, the forecast spending represents the planned budgetary and statutory expenditures as presented in the Estimates documents (Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates).

For the period 2016–17 to 2018–19, the planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the departmental Strategic Outcomes and Programs.

Environment and Climate Change Canada’s actual spending for 2014–15 was $976.2 million, a year-over-year decrease of $2.8 million (0.3%) from the 2013–14 actual spending. This decrease is mainly due to a reduction in payments in lieu of severance, parental benefits and the related Employee Benefit Plan, as well as a reduced statutory payment to the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC), offset by a one‑time transition payment made in 2014–15 as a result of the change from pay in arrears and increased funding for the National Conservation Plan.

The increase between 2014–15 actual spending and 2015–16 forecast spending is mainly due to the increase in funding for the National Conservation Plan, Meteorological Service of Canada and SDTC for the Sustainable Development Technology Fund as well as the new funding for Federal Infrastructure. These variances are offset by the payment in lieu of severance and parental benefits, the inclusion in 2014–15 of the one-time transition payment as a result of the change from pay in arrears, as well as the statutory payment in 2014–15 to the NCC.

The decreases between 2015–16 forecast statutory and voted spending and 2016–17 planned statutory and voted spending is mainly due to the funding that will expire on March 31, 2016 for initiatives such as the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda and Federal Contaminated Sediment Action Plan, as well as a reduction in funding for the Meteorological Service of Canada and for Contaminated Sediment Remediation Projects. These decreases are partially offset by increases for SDTC for the Sustainable Development Technology Fund.

For variance explanation between 2016–17 and 2018–19 planned spending, please see the Planned Expenditures section.

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Estimates by Vote

For information on Environment and Climate Change Canada’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2016–17 Main Estimates.

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