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Supplementary Information Tables

Horizontal Initiatives

Canadian Group on Earth Observations

The Canadian Group on Earth Observations is a collection of federal departments participating in the international Group on Earth Observations (GEO).

Name of Lead Department(s)

Environment Canada is the lead department by virtue of the identification of the ADM of the Meteorological Service of Canada as the GEO Principal.

Lead Department Program Activity

Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Start Date

July 2003.

End Date

Ongoing.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date)

Provided through existing resource envelope and in-kind contributions from federal departments.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

The GEO is implementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), which seeks to create free and open access to Earth observations for decision and policy-makers in all countries. In so doing, users such as Environment Canada and other participating departments will be better able to more accurately predict the future state of planet Earth and better warn citizens of the onset of hazardous conditions. See the GEO website for more details.

Shared Outcome(s)

  • Enhancing access to Global Earth Observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements

  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international

  • Improving evidence-based decision making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations

Governance Structure(s)

Coordination is achieved through the newly created ADM-level Federal Committee on Geomatics and Earth Observations (FCGEO), a DG-level shadow committee; and through ad hoc working-level committees and task groups.

Performance Highlights

Environment Canada

Canada is working with the United States Group on Earth Observations (US GEO) on joint projects, such as the binational group for the Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS), which is working to improve monitoring and data sharing in the Great Lakes basin. Work continues to establish similar groups in the Prairies and the Rocky Mountains for better understanding of the water cycle and better predictions of drought, flood and water quality conditions. This is connected to Global Drought Monitoring Initiative efforts. At the November 2011 GEO Plenary in Istanbul, the international community reaffirmed member countries' commitment to the GEOSS. At this plenary, for the first time, Canada was elected to the Executive Committee and will serve a two-year term representing the Americas' caucus. During 2011-2012, Canada has actively contributed to global efforts in forest carbon tracking and in the Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM). The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) will assume the chairmanship of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) in 2012.

Canada also plays a key role in the GEO Monitoring and Evaluation Working Group, with EC providing a co-chair and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) acting as Co-Chair of the Evaluation Team performing the third evaluation of GEO results, which focused on the progress made in the strategic targets for agriculture, biodiversity and ecosystems.

Interdepartmental international activities related to GEO, geomatics and related domains are being better coordinated through the efforts of the Federal Committee on Geomatics and Earth Observations (FCGEO). Co-chaired by AAFC and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), this ADM-level committee formed in 2011-2012 is focused on ensuring coherent Canadian positions and representation at related international fora as well on establishing a federal geospatial platform to increase the interoperability, availability and usefulness of geospatial data for decision and policy-makers.

Federal PartnersFederal Partner Program ActivityNames of Programs for Federal PartnersTotal Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ thousands)2011-12 ($ thousands)
Planned SpendingActual SpendingExpected ResultsResults Achieved
Environment CanadaWeather and environmental services for CanadiansMeteorological Service of Canada In-kind contributions of $100K salary and $50K O&M resources envelope (A-based)
$38K G&C
$75K salary
$25K O&M
$88K G&C

Bilateral projects with U.S., including international test beds and research projects

Coordination of Canadian inputs and positions for international 2011 GEO Plenary in Turkey

CGEO departments are engaged in Earth observation data issues and policy development

See above
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Science and Technology In-kind
To be determined
Not availableNot availableAAFC was actively involved in the development of the GEO-GLAM (Global Agricultural Monitoring) work plan and the Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM).
Canadian Space Agency Earth Observations In-kind
To be determined
In-kind (planning and coordination) and some O&M ($10K)Not availableCSA provided data dissemination, coordination and planning support to GEO activities related to global monitoring via satellites in forestry (Global Forest Observation Initiative), agriculture (GEO-GLAM) and disaster management projects either directly (RADARSAT data provided to disaster response pilots in Caribbean and Namibia) and through its membership and leadership in CEOS.
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Science and Technology In-kind
To be determined
Not availableNot availableSee above
Natural Resources Canada Mapping Information Branch In-kind
To be determined
Not availableNot availableSee above
 Canadian Forest Service In-kind$125K salary
$20K O&M
a) Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics panel (GOFC-GOLD). Fire Early Warning Systema) Prototype in place
b) GOFC; fire extraction from NIRST (New Infrared Sensor Technology)b) Fire emissivity; fire extraction algorithm ongoing
c) Input on Global Forest Observation Initiative (GFOI) methods and sciencec) Contributions to GFOI methods and guidance document to support international Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) efforts
Total  200K salary
55K O&M
88K G&C
  

Comments on Variances

In general, Environment Canada expenditures in terms of O&M for GEO were reduced as a result of limited capacity being redirected to other priorities and efforts to reduce travel. In terms of Grants and Contributions, in the past DFAIT used to make a contribution of $50,000 to GEO, which that department stopped doing a couple of years ago. Environment Canada has been able to find room in its Grants and Contributions budget to continue to keep the Canadian contributions at $88,000 since that time.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners

Not applicable

Contact Information

Michael Crowe
Director, Strategic Integration
Meteorological Service of Canada
Environment Canada
141 Laurier Ave. West
Ottawa ON  K1A 0H3
613-943-5580

Top of Page

Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative

Name of Lead Department(s)

Environment Canada

Lead Department Program Activity

Sustainable Ecosystem

Start Date

April 1, 2010 (Great Lakes Action Plan, Phase V (GLAPV) Departmental resources envelope (A-Based) as of Budget 2010)

End Date

Not applicable

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date)

End Date not applicable - $8 million per year

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

The Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative is Environment Canada's mechanism for coordinating efforts to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem, and ensure delivery of federal commitments as expressed in the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Environment Canada uses the Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem to engage other federal departments and Ontario in delivering Canada's Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments.

Environment Canada's Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative (GLBEI) reflects Budget 2010 investments targeted at continuing the work under the Great Lakes Action Plan to improve the ecological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. The GLAPV is allocated $8 million per year to continue the environmental restoration of key aquatic Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Federal departments also use the departmental resources envelope (A-Base) to support their efforts towards achieving COA results.

Shared Outcome(s)

The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement establishes broad, long-term objectives for Canada and the United States in restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. The COA provides a short-term plan for achieving Canada's Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments. Through the COA, federal and provincial agencies are guided by a shared vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem for present and future generations. The COA also establishes a common purpose and shared goals, results and commitment in four priority areas: restoration of Areas of Concern; reduction of harmful pollutants; achievement of lakes and basin sustainability; and coordination of monitoring, research and information.

Governance structure(s)

Eight federal departments are engaged in delivering GLBEI results under the COA: Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Transport Canada, Infrastructure Canada and Health Canada.

The COA Management Committee is the senior federal-provincial management body responsible for setting priorities, establishing strategies to ensure delivery of the COA, and developing common positions and joint action plans for representing Canadian interests and engaging in cooperative initiatives with the United States agencies and the International Joint Commission.

Planning, prioritization and allocation of GLAPV monies is managed through the Ontario Regional office of Environment Canada with the advice of the GLAPV Workplan Review Team. Members of the GLAPV Workplan Review Team consist of representatives from Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada receiving GLAPV funds. The GLAPV Workplan Review Team reviews proposed projects and activities, developing and regularly updating a coordinated federal workplan based on priorities required to support Great Lakes Action Plan implementation.

Performance Highlights

Federal PartnersFederal Partner Program ActivityNames of Programs for Federal PartnersTotal Allocation (start date to end date) (millions)2011-12 (millions)
Planned SpendingActual SpendingExpected ResultsResults Achieved
Environment CanadaSustainable EcosystemsCOA$40 M GLAPV, plus depart'l resources envelope (A-Base)$7.0 M GLAPV, plus $1.2 M depart'l resources envelope (A-Base)$7.0 M GLAPV, plus $1.2 M depart'l resources envelope (A-Base)All COA results, except Ann. 2-3.2See below
Fisheries and Oceans CanadaSustainable Aquatic EcosystemsCOA$3.7 M GLAPV, plus $4.7 M depart'l resources envelope (A-Base), plus $40.5 M depart'l resources envelope (A-Base)for Sea Lamprey control$756.8 K GLAPV, plus $930 K depart'l resources envelope (A-Base) towards Areas of Concern, plus $8.1 M depart'l resources envelope depart'l resources envelope (A-Base) for Sea Lamprey control$756.8 K GLAPV, plus $930 K depart'l resources envelope (A-Base) towards Areas of Concern, plus $8.1 M depart'l resources envelope (A-Base) for Sea Lamprey controlAnn. 1-2.4 Ann. 1-2.6 Ann. 3-1.2 Ann. 3-1.3 Ann. 3-1.4 Ann. 3-3.1 Ann. 3-3.2 Ann. 3-4.1 Ann. 3-4.2 Ann. 3-5.1 Ann. 4-1.1 Ann. 4-2.2See below
Sea Lamprey Control Program
Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaEnvironmental SustainabilityGrowing Forward$57 M for environment and climate change from April 1, 2008, to March 31, 2013$9,180 K$7,080 KAnn. 1-1.2 Ann. 1-2.2 Ann. 2-2.3 Ann. 3-1.2 Ann. 3-1.4 Ann. 3-2.2 Ann. 4-1.1 Ann. 4-2.2See below
Natural Resources CanadaCanada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resourcesPort Hope Long-term Low-level Radioactive Waste Mgmt ProjectDepart'l resources envelope (A-Base) and C-Base.$356.5 K$375.4 KAnn. 1-2.3 Ann. 3-1.4 Ann. 3-2.4See below
CFS Forest harvesting in riparian zones
Ecosystem risk management: Canada understands and mitigates risks to natural resource ecosystems and human healthCFS understanding and mitigating risks to aquatic biodiversity
Parks CanadaHeritage Resources ConservationCOADepart'l resources envelope (A-Base)No COA AllocationNo COA AllocationAnn. 3-1.1 Ann. 3-1.2 Ann. 3-1.3 Ann. 3-2.2 Ann. 3-3.2 Ann. 3-3.3 Ann. 4-1.1 Ann. 4-2.2.See below
Public Appreciation and Understanding
Transport CanadaEnvironmental Protection and Remediation; the Canadian Ballast Water ProgramCOADepart'l resources envelope (A-Base)$519.0 K$517.0 KAnn. 3-1.3 Ann. 3-2.1 Ann. 3-4.1 Ann. 3-4.2See below
Infrastructure CanadaInfrastructure funding programBuilding Canada Plan (Building Canada Fund; Provincial-Territorial Base Fund and Gas Tax Fund), Green Infrastructure Fund Sunsetting programs (CSIF, MRIF).No COA allocationNo COA allocationNo COA allocationINFC supports the objectives of the COA with particular emphasis on Annex items Ann. 1-1.1 Ann. 1-2.1.See below
Health CanadaRegions and Programs Bureau - Ontario RegionCOADepart'l resources envelope (A-Base)No depart'l resources envelope (A-Base) funding. COA Commit-ment incor-porated in CMP initiatives.No COA allocationAnn. 2-3.2See below
Total GLAPV, plus departmental funding $7.8 M
GLAPV
$7.8 M GLAPV  

Results Achieved in 2011-2012

Specific Results by Department:

Environment Canada

The Department continued its work to achieve progress in the restoration of Great Lakes Areas of Concern:

  • In May 2011, Canada and Ontario declared the Jackfish Bay Area of Concern (AOC) to be an area in recovery. An AOC may be designated as an Area in Recovery when all remedial actions have been completed in the AOC; however, additional time is needed for the recovery of beneficial uses. The status report confirmed that significant improvement had occurred since the area was originally listed as an AOC; however, more time is needed for natural recovery, a process that will be measured by the area in recovery monitoring program established in 2011-2012.

  • In May 2011, Canada and Ontario declared the Jackfish Bay Area of Concern (AOC) to be an area in recovery. An AOC may be designated as an Area in Recovery when all remedial actions have been completed in the AOC; however, additional time is needed for the recovery of beneficial uses. The status report confirmed that significant improvement had occurred since the area was originally listed as an AOC; however, more time is needed for natural recovery, a process that will be measured by the area in recovery monitoring program established in 2011-2012.

  • A Stage 2 Remedial Action Plan report for the Canadian portion of the Detroit River AOC was released in January 2012. The report is a comprehensive assessment of the current status of beneficial use impairments in the AOC, an evaluation of the remedial actions to restore beneficial uses carried out from 1998-2008, and recommendations regarding the remaining remedial actions: their priority, timelines and agency/organization responsible.

  • A four-year sediment transport monitoring study in the Trent River (flowing into the Bay of Quinte-an AOC)-was completed. The sediment management option selected was monitored, and natural recovery and measures were implemented to restrict activity that might disturb sediments in the river.

Environment Canada continued its work to reduce the release of harmful substances through a variety of activities and projects:

  • A commitment to facilitate the sharing of information between Canada and Ontario's respective chemicals management plans was implemented and quarterly meetings were held to support this initiative. Toxics reduction efforts previously undertaken through the Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy (GLBTS) have now been integrated into the federal Chemicals Management Plan risk management strategies.

  • After over 10 years of binational effort, 2011-2012 marked a transition year for the GLBTS as negotiations continued to amended the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, which is expected to create a new process for the selection, identification and development of control strategies for existing and emerging chemicals of concern.

Work continued to achieve a better understanding of, and reporting on the Great Lakes Ecosystem status and trends. Environment Canada worked collaboratively with universities and other government and non-governmental agencies on many projects with the following results:

  • In 2011-2012, the State of the Great Lakes Ecosystem Conference was held. Over 50 draft indicator reports and the draft Great Lakes Ecosystem Status and Trends summary report were presented at this conference, the ninth conference held since 1994. The conference and associated report continues to be an effective means of developing binational agreement on the state of the lakes and communicating this information to stakeholders and the public.

  • The annual Lakewide Management Plans (LaMPs) reports were published for each of the Great Lakes, providing a yearly update on the accomplishments and challenges, and identifying the next steps to take to achieve each lake's ecosystem goals and objectives.

  • Implementation began of the Lake Superior Aquatic Invasive Species Complete Prevention Plan to prevent new aquatic invasive species (AIS) from becoming established in the Lake Superior ecosystem. The Plan sets out key recommended actions to be taken by both the United States and Canada and outlines a list of AIS vectors and pathways to be addressed.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Work continued to conduct science to enhance and protect fish habitats; to control the established invasive species to reduce their effects on fisheries and the ecosystem; and to assess the risk and protect against new invaders. Fisheries and Oceans Canada

  • Provided monitoring and science to support the delisting of Areas of Concern, including the Bay of Quinte, Toronto Harbour, Hamilton Harbour, the Detroit River and the St. Clair River. Results include Biotic Integrity and Habitat Productivity indices for nearshore fish populations; fish habitat classification and supply models to measure the success of habitat restorations; long-term assessments of lower-trophic levels and food web status; and ecosystem models for evaluating cumulative effects.

  • Delivered an integrated program of Sea Lamprey management in the Great Lakes in collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services, under the direction of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Results include successful lampricide treatments in tributaries and connection channels in lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron and Superior to suppress invasive Sea Lampreys and to protect and restore native fishes. Achieved suppression targets for abundances of adult Sea Lampreys in lakes Ontario and Superior and made progress toward targets in Lake Huron. Continued research and development of new alternative Sea Lamprey control methods including field trials of Sea Lamprey pheromones.

  • Carried out risk assessments of potential aquatic invasive species, including a binational risk assessment of Asian Carp; evaluated the impact of aquatic invasive species on Great Lakes ecosystems; and monitored ballast water management to establish its effectiveness in eliminating importation of new species through this vector.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

The department continued its work to improve beneficial agriculture management practices with the involvement of the Great Lakes farming community in numerous projects:

  • Under agreement with Ontario, the department delivered the Canada-Ontario Environmental Farm Plan and Canada-Ontario Farm Stewardship Program to farmers, resulting in the province-wide implementation of 438 peer-reviewed environmental farm plans and 1859 on-farm beneficial management practice projects in 2011-2012.

Natural Resources Canada

Work continued towards the achievement of the sustainable development of Canada's energy, forestry and mineral metals resources within the Great Lakes Basin, including:

  • Enhanced policies and practices to mitigate forestry impacts on creeks and rivers.

  • Enhanced utilization of herbicides on forests to reduce impacts on aquatic organisms.

  • Federal funding approval for the implementation of clean-up activities based on detailed remediation designs for contaminated sites, including the Port Hope Harbour, and for the construction of a new long-term waste management facility to manage the Port Hope area's historic low-level radioactive wastes.

Parks Canada

The Agency delivers the National Parks and National Marine Conservation Areas Programs and works to develop and maintain a viable protected areas network in the Great Lakes Basin that is relevant to Canadians. The Agency

  • Led federal participation in environmental assessments of Niagara-on-the-Lake sewage plant upgrade and the Kingston (Cataraqui) river crossing.

  • Monitored coastal fish populations in the Fathom Five National Marine Park of Canada.

  • Monitored coastal streams in the Pukaskwa National Park of Canada.

Transport Canada

Work continued to ensure compliance with Canada Shipping Act regulations related to the ecosystem health of the Great Lakes. Transport Canada undertook a wide variety of inspection, monitoring and training programs. The department

  • Boarded vessels entering the Great Lakes to ensure compliance with ballast water regulations

  • Carried out biological analysis and evaluation of vessels targeted in the Joint Boarding Program. Analysis indicated the program is very effective in decreasing the risk of discharge of AIS in ballast water. No AIS attributed to ships have been found in the Great Lakes since 2006 when the Canadian regulations came into force

  • Supported Canadian firms interested in the development of ballast water technology programs compliant with the International Marine Organization's Ballast Water and Sediments Management standards. Two firms in the program-Trojan and Degussa-have produced type-approved ballast water management systems available on the world market.

  • It should be noted that Canada has ratified the International Marine Organization's outstanding pollution prevention Conventions from 2007 and has put in place a regulatory regime to enforce them.

Infrastructure Canada

Work continued toward providing funding to eligible infrastructure projects in support of federal objectives such as a cleaner environment, which includes improved wastewater treatment:

  • Since 2007, the Government of Canada has announced over $537 million for wastewater infrastructure in the Great Lakes watershed, through the Building Canada Fund, the Green Infrastructure Fund, and the Infrastructure Stimulus Fund. Of this amount, approximately $383 million in federal funding has been committed toward treatment projects that result in improved municipal wastewater effluent.

  • In 2011-2012, Infrastructure Canada focused on moving a number of large-scale projects towards implementation. This includes $248.6 million announced through the Building Canada Fund - Major Infrastructure Component and the Green Infrastructure Fund, in support of 8 major infrastructure projects located in communities near the Great Lakes. Among these initiatives, approximately $178 million is supporting major projects to improve the quality of municipal wastewater effluent in the following Areas of Concern: the St. Lawrence River, Hamilton Harbour and Nipigon Bay.

Health Canada

The department continued its work to enhance environmental health knowledge within the Great Lakes Basin that can be integrated into policies to address risks to human health by all levels of government:

  • Health Canada supported and facilitated the development of environmental public health networks in the Great Lakes Basin.

  • The Great Lakes Public Health Network (GLPHN) supported 230 federal-provincial-municipal government staff members with 6 environmental health webinars, providing background documents of scientific knowledge, and 10 monthly e-newsletters to date. United States participation through the Great Lakes Human Health Network was also supported

Comments on Variances (if applicable)

Environment Canada

Dedicated Great Lakes funding (GLAPV) is received only by Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, which also each contribute departmental resources envelope (A-Base) funding towards achieving results under the COA. All other partners to the COA (federal and provincial) achieve COA results via departmental funding.

Parks Canada

Figures for planned and actual spending are not available as Parks Canada financial coding systems are not designed to separate out Great Lakes-specific activities.

Health Canada

Health Canada supports work for the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative through the joint Environment Canada/Health Canada Chemicals Management Plan. Specific resource figures are not available as this spending is not tracked separately in Health Canada's financial system.

Infrasctructure Canada

Federal infrastructure funding programs do not include an allocation specific to the COA. Projects that are to be funded may be determined through a competitive, merit-based process, through joint federal-provincial discussions; or the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities may accept an annual capital plan describing these.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable)

See below.

Contact Information

Jennifer McKay
Great Lakes Environment Office
Environment Canada
416-739-5712

Appendix - COA Results Statements

Priority 1 - Areas of Concern

Result 1.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial or municipal wastewater to achieve delisting targets in Nipigon Bay and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources to meet delisting criteria in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.3 - Contaminated sediment management strategies developed for the Wheatley Harbour AOC and implemented in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.4 - Plans in place and being implemented to rehabilitate fish and wildlife habitats and populations to meet delisting targets in the Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.5 - Informed, effective collaboration amongst government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in Nipigon Bay, Jackfish Bay, Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.6 - Environmental monitoring and reporting to document improvements and track environmental recovery.

Result 2.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from municipal sewage treatment plants, combined sewer overflows, urban stormwater and industrial wastewater towards delisting targets in St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources towards achieving RAP delisting criteria in St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, and Toronto and Region AOCs.

Result 2.3 - Progress made in developing sediment management strategies to reduce ecological and human health risk from contaminated sediments in Thunder Bay, Peninsula Harbour, St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Port Hope and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.4 - Long-term management plans being developed and priority actions for delisting being implemented for rehabilitation and protection of fish and wildlife habitats and populations in St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.5 - Informed, effective collaboration amongst government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in AOCs.

Result 2.6 - Identify monitoring needs, undertake required studies and evaluate results to assess environmental recovery and support remediation strategies in AOCs.

Priority 2 - Harmful Pollutants

Result 1.1 - Reduction in releases of Tier 1 substances beyond the 2005 achievements towards the goal of virtual elimination.

Result 2.1 - Reduction in releases of Criteria Air Pollutants.

Result 2.2 - Coordinated activities to reduce releases from municipal wastewater.

Result 2.3 - Develop and initiate a program for the Sound Management of Chemical Substances in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.1 - Improved understanding of the sources, fate and impacts of harmful pollutants in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.2 - Human Health risks from harmful pollutants are understood and addressed in the Great Lakes Basin

Priority 3 - Lake and Basin Sustainability

Result 1.1 - Increased awareness and appreciation of the Great Lakes and their contributions to social, economic and environmental well-being.

Result 1.2 - Increased stewardship actions that work towards a balance between human well-being and prosperity, and healthy aquatic ecosystems.

Result 1.3 - Sustainable use of land, water and other natural resources to provide benefits from the Great Lakes now and in the future.

Result 1.4 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and resources.

Result 2.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial and municipal wastewater, combined sewer overflows and urban stormwater sources consistent with actions specified in binational Lakewide Management Plans (LaMPs) and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural sources by undertaking actions specified in the binational Lakewide Management Plans and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.3 - Identification of contaminated sediment and development of sediment management plans to reduce the release and impact of sediment-bound contaminants on the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem.

Result 2.4 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes water quality.

Result 3.1 - Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and habitats are protected, restored and sustained consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.2 - Progress on rehabilitation of Great Lakes native species to restore the health of aquatic ecosystems, consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.3 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, habitats and species.

Result 4.1 - Implementation of the "National Action Plan to Address the Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species" in the Great Lakes.

Result 4.2: Enhanced knowledge about the harmful impacts of aquatic invasive species on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, food webs and species.

Result 5.1 - The impacts of climate change on the Great Lakes ecosystem composition, structure, and function, including biodiversity (organisms and their habitat), water quality and quantity, human health and safety (including access to clean drinking water), social well being and economic prosperity are understood by governments and the Great Lakes community.

Result 6.1 - The potential risks to Great Lakes drinking water intakes are identified and assessed, and early actions to address risks are undertaken

Result 6.2 - Develop knowledge and understanding of water quality and quantity issues of concern to the Great Lakes as drinking water sources.

Priority 4 - Coordination of Monitoring, Research and Information

Result 1.1 - Responsive and comprehensive monitoring and research programs.

Result 2.1 - Improved reporting on environmental conditions, changes and progress.

Result 2.2 - Increased sharing of data and information among governments, organizations and Basin residents.

Top of Page

Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan

The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005 (followed from the two-year Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP)

Name of Lead Department(s)

Environment Canada (EC) and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS)

Lead Department Program Activity

Substances and Waste Management (EC); Management Frameworks (TBS)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

FCSAP was approved in 2005, with funding of $3.5 billion over 15 years. The first phase of the program ended March 31, 2011. The second phase of the program has been approved, and will run through to March 31, 2016.

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

FCSAP is expected to continue for 15 years (from 2005), to March 31, 2020. However, the current policy approval for Phase II ends March 31, 2016.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)

$2,737.5 million (including PWGSC accommodations charges) to March 31, 2016.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) provides a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites presenting the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2011, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $4.354 billion. Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered jointly by Environment Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Shared Outcome(s)

Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.

Governance Structure(s)

TheFederal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by a Director Generals Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

Performance Highlights

Environment Canada developed, in collaboration with the Treasury Board Secretariat and 16 other participating federal entities, a proposal for FCSAP program renewal that was approved by Cabinet in June of 2011. Fiscal year 2011-2012 was the first year of the second phase of the program, which will run through to March 31, 2016. Assessment activities were undertaken at 831 sites and completed at 249 of these sites; remediation activities were undertaken at 417 sites and remediation was completed at 21 of these sites. Several key program tools were developed during 2011-2012 to improve decision making, performance measurement and reporting.

Federal PartnersFederal Partner Program ActivityNames of Programs for Federal PartnersTotal Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ thousands)2011-12 ($ thousands)
Planned SpendingActual SpendingExpected ResultsResults Achieved
* Expected Results: No information for expected results was available for the 2011-2012 Report on Plans and Priorities because the FCSAP program renewal was developed and approved by Cabinet in June 2011.
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development CanadaFederal Administration of Reserve LandContaminated Sites Management Program188,40611,33411,238 See below
Federal Administration of Reserve LandContaminated Sites1,107,928106,60194,897 See below
Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaInternal ServicesContaminated Sites7,276342272 See below
Canada Border Services AgencyInternal ServicesInfrastructure and Environment3,49000 n/a
Canadian Food Inspection Agencyn/an/a18400 n/a
Correctional Service CanadaCustodyFacilities / Asset Management Services14,1462,543$1,917 See below
Environment CanadaSubstances and Waste ManagementAsset Remediation and Disposal57,2214,355$3,102 Custodian
Contaminated Sites74,6716,4906,357 

Secretariat

Expert Support

Fisheries and Oceans CanadaInternal ServicesContaminated Sites - FCSAP projects94,8853,8473,763 Custodian
Sustainable Aquatic EcosystemsFCSAP Expert Support31,1221,9551,830 Expert Support
Health CanadaFirst Nations and Inuit HealthFirst Nations and Inuit Health Protection7,4457063 Custodian
Environmental Risks to HealthHealthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch62,7494,235$4,178 Expert Support
Industry CanadaCommunications Research Centre CanadaContaminated Site Management Program1625454 See below
Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges IncorporatedManagement of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montréal arean/a23,8901,0780 See below
Marine Atlantic Inc.Corporate ManagementFCSAP (projects)12000 n/a
National Capital Commission Real Asset ManagementLand and Real Asset Management31,8296,3891,661 See below
National DefenceEnvironmental Protection and StewardshipContaminated Sites Program576,14765,01951,982 See below
National Research Council CanadaInternal ServicesEnvironmental Operations5,257139130 See below
Natural Resources CanadaInternal ServicesThe provision of relevant and timely policy analysis and advice for decision making on government priorities and departmental responsibilities28,859304251 See below
Parks CanadaHeritage Resources ConservationActive Management and Restoration51,5512,9151,389 See below
Public Works and Government Services CanadaAccommodation and Real Property Assets Management ProgramFCSAP (projects)109,3008,5394,470 See below
FCSAP (expert services)8,850700677 See below
Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceCorporate Infrastructure/ Internal ServicesFCSAP (projects)25,605924611 See below
Transport CanadaEnvironmental StewardshipEnvironmental Programs204,46713,0977,397 See below
Treasury Board of Canada SecretariatManagement FrameworksAssets and Acquired Services5,386527523 See below
Total
(excluding PWGSC accommodations charges;
totals may not add due to rounding)
2,720,945241,458196,763 See below

Results Achieved and Comments on Variance(s)

In 2011-2012, the FCSAP federal partners spent 81% ($196.8 million) of the available funding; reprofiled, carried forward or cash-managed 17% ($39.9 million) to future years, and lapsed 2% ($4.8 million). Details below.

Federal PartnerResults Achieved for 2011-12Comments on Variance(s)
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada - Southern ProgramAboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's (AANDC's) Southern Program completed the assessment of 46 sites. An additional 5 sites had ongoing assessment activities and 78 sites had ongoing remediation activities.

Additional funds: $646K was carried forward from previous years and $219K was received from AANDC's Northern Program.

Adjustments: $27K was cash-managed internally.

$69K lapsed ($40K program management funding and $29K remediation funding).

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada - Northern ProgramAboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's (AANDC's) Northern Program completed the assessment of 45 sites and the remediation of 3 sites. An additional 38 sites had ongoing assessment activities and 70 sites had ongoing remediation activities.

$11.1M was reprofiled to 2012-2013.

$219K was transferred to AANDC's Southern Program.

Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaAgriculture and Agri-Food Canada completed the assessment of 3 sites. An additional 2 sites had ongoing remediation activities.Minor lapse in assessment funds due to project costs coming in lower than estimated. Lapse in remediation funds due to not being able to complete a planned remediation project late in the fiscal year.
Correctional Service CanadaCorrectional Service Canada completed the assessment of 28 sites and the remediation of 6 sites.$626K was internally cash-managed into 2012-2013.
Environment Canada - CustodianEnvironment Canada completed the assessment of 8 sites.

An additional 6 sites had ongoing assessment activities and 6 sites had ongoing remediation activities.
$800K has been reprofiled for a major project. As for the remaining $453K, the actual spending was less than planned for the same major project.
Environment Canada - Secretariat

In its role of managing the FCSAP program, Environment Canada continued to provide program oversight and administration (including reviewing project submissions for eligibility, maintaining the priority list of eligible projects and tracking program expenditures at mid year and year end).

In collaboration with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and 16 other participating federal entities, a proposal for FCSAP program renewal was developed and approved by Cabinet in June 2011. The Secretariat also prepared the Treasury Board Submission, which was approved in September 2011.

$133K was lapsed due to the delay in receiving 2011-2012 funding until the program was renewed at mid year.
Environment Canada - Expert Support

In its role as an expert support department for the FCSAP program, Environment Canada provided scientific guidance and expert advice to custodial departments for the management of their sites so that risks to the environment are reduced or minimized.

Environment Canada

  • Coordinated and reviewed the site classifications for more than 170 sites to ensure that they are eligible for FCSAP remediation/risk management funding

  • Initiated an on-line training program with the Canada School of Public Service to increase accessibility of training for program partners

  • Developed guidance and tools to assist custodians with the managing and prioritizing of their sites

Fisheries and Oceans Canada - CustodianFisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) undertook work at 434 assessment sites and at 80 remediation/risk management sites in 2011-2012.

DFO Custodian received $305K from DFO Expert Support during mid-year review. $200K was transferred to FCSAP remediation/risk management.

$84K was lapsed, $74K of which is due to staffing delays and $10K is due to invoices coming in lower than expected for assessment and remediation/risk management activities.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada - Expert Support

In its role as an expert support department for the FCSAP program, Fisheries and Oceans Canada provided scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the management of federal contaminated sites that may be impacting, or have the potential to impact, fish or fish habitat. Fisheries and Oceans Canada

  • Developed guidance material and provided training on the management of FCSAP aquatic sites to custodial organizations (e.g. FCSAP Aquatic Sites Framework, the Aquatic Sites Classification System and Ecological Risk Assessment statements of work)

  • Reviewed project submissions to ensure that the potential impacts to fish and fish habitat had been appropriately considered

  • Reviewed and evaluated FCSAP projects to ascertain if, and to what level, the risk to fish and fish habitat had been reduced as a result of custodial actions

Staffing delays caused an inability to access all resources.
Health Canada - CustodianHealth Canada undertook remediation/risk management activities at 1 site during FY 2011-2012.$70K of assessment funds from 2010-2011 were carried forward and reallocated to remediation; project costs were less than anticipated.
Health Canada - Expert Support

In its role as an expert support department for the FCSAP program, Health Canada provided guidance, training and expert advice on human health risk assessments, risk management and public involvement to custodial departments under the FCSAP program. Health Canada

  • Conducted site visits and reviewed site-related documents submitted under the FCSAP program 

  • Reviewed site submissions in order to determine the eligibility for funding

Staffing delays caused an inability to access all resources.
Industry CanadaIndustry Canada had ongoing assessment activities at 1 site. 
Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges IncorporatedJacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated had ongoing remediation activities at 3 sites.Major revenue from the provincial partner.  Balance paid using regular budget. $1.1M was reprofiled to 2012-2013.
National Capital CommissionThe National Capital Commission completed the assessment of 60 sites and 6 sites had ongoing remediation activities.$3M was reprofiled into 2013-2014. $1.7M of internal cash management was redirected into 2012-2013.
National Defence

National Defence completed the assessment of 33 sites and the remediation of 2 sites.

An additional 86 sites had ongoing assessment activities and 66 sites had ongoing remediation activities.

$10M was reprofiled into 2013-2014 and $3M was lapsed.

The reasons for variance were numerous, including work conducted for less than estimated; the use of internal funds; weather conditions that affected the amount of work completed; departmental approval processes that delayed delegation of FCSAP funds; and a bridge to access a site that was washed away too late in the fiscal year to rebuild.

National Research Council CanadaNational Research Council Canada completed the assessment of 1 site. An additional 3 sites had ongoing remediation activities.The majority of lapsed funds are associated with lower-than-expected expenditures in the project management portion of the funding.
Natural Resources CanadaNatural Resources Canada had ongoing assessment activities at 4 sites and ongoing remediation activities at 1 site.Project costs came in under budget.
Parks CanadaParks Canada completed the assessment of 3 sites and the remediation of 6 sites. An additional 7 sites had ongoing assessment activities and 31 sites had ongoing remediation activities.Funds were carried forward.
Public Works and Government Services Canada - CustodianPublic Works and Government Services Canada completed remediation at 1 site. An additional site had ongoing assessment activities and 21 sites had ongoing remediation activities.Forecasted remediation work could not be completed due to late timing of funds.
Public Works and Government Services Canada - Expert SupportIn its role as an expert support department for the FCSAP program, Public Works and Government Services Canada developed project management tools and training, innovative technology profiles, and demand forecast analysis for sharing with the private sector as well as ongoing analysis of procurement issues.Consultant contract could not be completed.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police as custodian completed the assessment of 19 sites under FCSAP. Assessment work will continue outside the FCSAP program at 10 of these sites, and 9 sites were closed.

Remediation was also completed under FCSAP at 2 sites. These sites will require additional work outside the FCSAP program.

An additional 2 sites had ongoing remediation activities.

The variance is explained by a total of $240K of projects not going through: approximately $93K of unspent remediation funds and $148K of unspent assessment funds.

For remediation projects, the variance is due to several projects. One project (approximately $20K) was determined to be ineligible for FCSAP expenditures. Two projects came under budget, for a total of approximately $23K. Finally, the management of one project resulted in the work being paid with departmental funds (approximately $51K).

For assessment projects, $148K was not spent, as the project to which the funds were allocated was identified too late ineligible for FCSAP funds.

Finally, regarding program management funding, the RCMP carried forward $76K from 2010-2011 into 2011-2012. There is a planned carry forward of $72K into 2012-2013.

Transport Canada

Transport Canada completed the assessment of 3 sites and the remediation of 1 site.

An additional 26 sites had ongoing remediation activities.

The $5.7M variance was carried forward to future years. Factors contributing to the variance include the following:

  • a $1M project that did not proceed, as further studies were required to determine the best remedial approach

  • delays due to the federal government contracting process, a reduced field season in the North, variances in contract tender prices, additional delineation required before the remediation project could proceed, and reductions in project scope, all of which impacted project costs

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat supports Environment Canada in the management of the FCSAP program through the provision of policy advice and guidance to ensure that the ongoing implementation of the FCSAP is undertaken in a manner consistent with Treasury Board policies on the management of federal real property and federal contaminated sites.

In this role, TBS

  • Supported Environment Canada in the development of a proposal for FCSAP program renewal that was approved by Cabinet in June of 2011 and a Treasury Board Submission that was approved in September 2011, in consultation with 16 participating federal entities

  • Maintained the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory

  • Supported the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development audit of federal contaminated sites (report to be tabled in May 2012)

  • Coordinated planning for the May 2012 Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop

 

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable)

n/a

Contact Information

FCSAP Secretariat
Compliance Promotion and Contaminated Sites Division
15th floor, Place Vincent Massey
351 St. Joseph Blvd.
Gatineau QC  K1A 0H3
819-934-8153