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Performance Report on Environment Canada's 2011–2012 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Part 2: EC's Performance Achievements for 2011-2012 on FSDS Implementation Strategies

Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

3. Goal: Water Quality - Protect and enhance the quality of water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

3.1 Target: Fresh Water Quality - Complete federal actions to restore beneficial uses in Canadian Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes by 2020.
3.2 Target: Contribute to the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes by developing and gaining binational acceptance of objectives and strategies for the management of nutrients in the Great Lakes by 2015.
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

3.1.1 Fund external work through Grants and Contribution Agreements to coordinate Remedial Action Plans related to the remediation and restoration of beneficial uses in Areas of Concern (AOCs) in the Great Lakes Basin and through the Great Lakes Sustainability Fund (GLSF) which provides technical and financial support to projects to clean up and restore Areas of Concern. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Each Area of Concern has developed a remedial action plan (RAP) that guides restoration and protection efforts. Remedial action plans proceed through three stages.

  • Stage 1 determines the severity and underlying causes of the environmental degradation that makes the location an AOC.

  • Stage 2 identifies the goals and recommends actions to restore and protect the ecosystem.

  • Stage 3 implements the recommended actions and measures progress to ensure the local goals have been met.

It is through these stage reports that the determination will be made as to whether the established indicator under the FSDS for Target 3.1 has been met: for Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes, the change in beneficial use (BU) status from "impaired" or "requires further assessment" to "not impaired" or "restored".

For further information, please visit the Great Lakes Areas of Concern website and the Great Lakes Sustainability Fund.

 
Performance Expectations:

Remedial Action Plan (RAP) stage reports are issued as critical stages in the RAP are reached.

Under the Great Lakes Action Plan, actions to continue and complete the restoration of beneficial use impairments in Canadian Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes are undertaken.

The following remedial action plan (RAP) stage reports were issued:

  • Jackfish Bay Area in Recovery Report

  • Detroit River (Canadian side) Stage 2 Report

  • Niagara River (Canadian side) Stage 2 Update Report

RAP stage reports are specified in the current Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and provide an effective means of guiding restoration and protection work in the Area of Concern. The Stage 1 report describes the severity and underlying causes of environmental degradation. The Stage 2 report identifies goals and actions to restore and protect the ecosystem. The Stage 3 report documents the implementation remedial measures, the results of environmental monitoring and assessment and confirmation of the restoration of the beneficial use impairments. An Area in Recovery report, while not a requirement of the current GLWQA, is issued when the Area of Concern has been identified as an Area of Concern in Recovery, which means that all reasonable restoration actions have been undertaken and additional time is needed for the ecosystem to recover and meet restoration objectives.

Actions continued in 2011-2012 to restore beneficial use impairments in Great Lakes Areas of Concern. A report providing the current status of beneficial use impairments in each Canadian AOC was issued in May 2011.

3.1.2 Fund external work through Grants and Contribution Agreements to implement Lakewide Management Plans related to the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

A lakewide management plan is an action plan for cooperatively restoring and protecting the ecosystem of one of the Great Lakes. Lakewide management plans are in place for Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. A similar binational partnership plan is in place for Lake Huron.

One area of focus for lakewide management plans is the management of nutrients. Reports on the activities and status of each lakewide management plan and binational partnership are issued annually. It is through these reports, and State of the Great Lakes reporting, that the determination will be made as to whether the established indicator under the FSDS for Target 3.2 has been met.

For further information, please visit the Great Lakes Lakewide Management Plan website.

 
Performance Expectations:
100% of EC's commitments under Annex 3 (Lake and Basin Sustainability) in the Canada-Ontario Agreement are assessed as being on track for completion by March 31, 2012.

Only one of the 82 Annex 3 commitments was not met by March 31, 2012: the development of a Canadian framework to assess and protect the Great Lakes nearshore. While work on the framework was initiated in 2011-2012, it was not completed. Federal and provincial officials are continuing to develop options for the framework using stakeholder input from a variety of sources.

99% of the commitments in Annex 3 had been met by March 31, 2012.

The 2011 annual Lakewide Management Plan reports were published for each of the Great Lakes in 2011-2012.

3.1.3 Establish important cooperative partnerships between the federal and provincial governments and engage appropriate private, public (including local governments and agencies), Aboriginal communities and stakeholder participation in order to achieve the vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable Great Lakes ecosystem. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Partnerships have been established on an overall Great Lakes-basin scale through the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem, on an individual lake-basin scale through the lakewide management plans and a binational partnership, and on a local scale through geographic and issue-specific programs and activities.

The provision of funding, technical and scientific expertise, coordination and communication activities assist other levels of government, organizations and communities in working together to resolve issues and protect Great Lakes ecosystems. For example, Lake Huron's Southeast Shore Working Group, Aboriginal Elders workshops and Lake Erie's Nutrient Management Strategy have assisted many partners in addressing nutrients and other ecosystem issues.

 
Performance Expectations:
All four of the binational Great Lakes will have established cooperative partnerships.Cooperative partnerships are in place for each of the binational Great Lakes. Each Lakewide Management Plan/Binational Partnership reports annually on work being carried out to protect and restore the lake. The most recent reports were issued in May 2011.

3.1.4 Promote voluntary approaches where appropriate to achieve results beyond compliance to attain Great Lakes water quality targets with respect to toxics, critical pollutant reduction, municipal wastewater sources, etc. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Program 1.2: Water Resources

Program 2.1: Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

Program 3.2 Climate Change & Clean Air

Program 3.3: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution

In partnership with municipalities in the Great Lakes Basin, research and development will be undertaken to evaluate and enhance wastewater process technologies. In addition, existing anaerobic technologies will be adapted and optimized using membrane processes for the efficient treatment of raw municipal wastewater to serve as a sustainable treatment technology for use in the Great Lakes Basin.

The Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy (GLBTS) sets forth a collaborative, beyond-compliance binational process through which EC and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, along with provinces, states, First Nations, tribes, industry, environmental groups and individual citizens come together in substance-specific work groups to execute reduction challenges for all of the GLBTS-targeted level one substances.

Another mechanism that supports voluntary approaches is the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem (COA). The Harmful Pollutants Annex to the COA sets out goals to achieve progress towards the virtual elimination of persistent bioaccumulative toxic substances and significant reductions of other harmful pollutants.

 
Performance Expectations:

In partnership with municipalities in the Great Lakes Basin, research and development will be undertaken to evaluate and enhance wastewater process technologies.

Existing anaerobic technologies will be adapted and optimized using membrane processes for efficient treatment of raw municipal wastewater, to serve as a sustainable treatment technology for use in the Great Lakes Basin.

In partnership with Ontario's Ministry of the Environment, Region of Peel and City of Toronto, EC conducted comparison studies of various advanced wastewater treatment technologies, including integrated fixed-film activated sludge, moving-bed bioreactor activated sludge, and conventional activated sludge and membrane technologies. Data reports are in preparation. These technologies have the potential to improve performance and reduce footprints over conventional treatment processes.

3.1.6 Release reports regularly on: State of the Great Lakes environmental indicators, the Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy, the status of Remedial Action Plans for AOCs in the Great Lakes, and updates for Lakewide Management Plans. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

A Canada-U.S. State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC) is held every three years to report on the state of the Great Lakes, to facilitate information sharing amongst Great Lakes decision-makers, and to provide information to government, corporate, and not-for-profit sectors that make decisions that affect the lakes.

A public-friendly state of the Great Lakes highlights report and a more detailed technical report are issued every three years, containing an overall assessment of the status of the Great Lakes ecosystem based on environmental and human health indicators.

State of the Great Lakes Reporting Web page.

A Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy (BTS) Progress Report is issued every two years, with a public-friendly newsletter being issued in the intervening years. The GLBTS provides a binational framework for actions to reduce or eliminate persistent toxic substances in the Great Lakes, and establishes reduction challenges for persistent toxic substances targeted for virtual elimination.

Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy Web page.

 
Performance Expectations:

RAP stage reports are issued as critical phases in the RAP are reached.

State of the Great Lakes highlights reports and a detailed technical report are issued triennially.

A Great Lakes BTS progress report is issued biennially, with a newsletter issued in the intervening years.

As previously noted under 3.1.2, Lakewide management plans update reports will be issued annually.

The following remedial action plan (RAP) stage reports were issued:

  • Jackfish Bay Area in Recovery Report

  • Detroit River (Canadian side) Stage 2 Report

  • Niagara River (Canadian side) Stage 2 Update Report

RAP stage reports are specified in the current Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and provide an effective means of guiding restoration and protection work in the Area of Concern. The Stage 1 report describes the severity and underlying causes of environmental degradation. The Stage 2 report identifies goals and actions to restore and protect the ecosystem. The Stage 3 report documents the implementation remedial measures, the results of environmental monitoring and assessment, and the confirmation of the restoration of the beneficial use impairments. An Area in Recovery report, while not a requirement of the current GLWQA, is issued when the Area of Concern has been identified as an Area of Concern in Recovery, which means that all reasonable restoration actions have been undertaken and additional time is needed for the ecosystem to recover and meet restoration objectives.

State of the Great Lakes reports are issued every three years. The last reports were released in 2009-2010 and so the next reports are anticipated in 2012-2013. Reports were not issued as per the triennial schedule in 2011-2012.

The final Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy newsletter was released in October 2011. It highlighted progress achieved in reductions of toxics released to the Great Lakes over the course of the 10-year strategy. Future binational chemicals management will take place under the amended Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

3.1.7 Coordinate with the United States scientific research and monitoring activities in the Great Lakes through the binational Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

In 2003, the Great Lakes Binational Executive Committee endorsed the Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI) to improve the coordination of monitoring in the Great Lakes. A five-year rotational cycle was adopted to focus on one lake per year.

The complete cycle for each lake involves two years of planning, one year of field activity and two years for analysis, synthesis and reporting. Starting with Lake Huron, the connecting channels will be included with the downstream lakes to the extent that they impact the downstream lakes.

Lake Ontario (Field Year 2008)
The focus of the Lake Ontario program includes understanding nearshore-offshore nutrient transport, assessing the status of the offshore lower foodweb, conducting a lakewide fishery assessment, and understanding food web changes using biomarkers.

Lake Erie (Field Year 2009)
Programs include a central and eastern basin nearshore-offshore nutrient study, a bioavailable phosphorus study, a western basin algal bloom project, a farm demonstration practice and a tillage study.

Lake Michigan (Field Year 2010)
Priorities being addressed include understanding nearshore issues and food web issues, and determining the status of contaminants in Lake Michigan waters, tributaries and sediment. In 2011-2012, lab analyses will be undertaken on samples taken from Lake Michigan in 2010.

Lake Superior (Field Year 2011)
Programs to be undertaken in 2011 include determining the status of Lake Superior chemicals of concern and chemicals of immediate concern to the ecosystem; and determining the status of the lower food web, the aquatic invasive species, and the native fish species in Lake Superior.

Lake Huron (Field Year 2012)
A prioritized list of issues is currently being identified for the Lake Huron field year.

 
Performance Expectations:

Publication of the findings regarding Lake Erie:

CSMI field work will be carried out in Lake Superior, lab analysis will be undertaken on samples taken from Lake Michigan in 2010, and reporting of findings on Lake Erie will be issued.

Indicator reports were prepared in collaboration with binational partners for nutrients, toxic chemicals and contaminants in fish for the Great Lakes (Lake Erie).

A major binational collaborative report on mercury in the Great Lakes (Lake Erie) was produced, indicating progress in controlling mercury emissions, which are expected to show benefits in the food chain.

Planned binational field work was carried out under the Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI) on Lake Superior in 2011, and planning started for the Lake Huron field year in 2012. A reporting and synthesis workshop was held to complete the 2008 cycle for Lake Ontario and start the planning for the 2013 Lake Ontario intensive year.

3.1.8 Manage/deliver Great Lakes results internally, within the Department, through the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

The Great Lakes Basin initiative will deliver the following programs, thereby supporting the development of federal actions to improve the quality of water in the Great Lakes.

  • Provide the results of applied scientific research, monitoring and assessment.

  • Coordinate community delivery of actions, public involvement and reporting progress. Publish contaminated sediment assessments and development of sediment management plans.

  • Promote dissemination of research results on stormwater management, combined sewer overflow control and treatment, and innovative wastewater management through the existing mechanisms (e.g. Science Alert) as well as through new methods (e.g. direct contact with Remedial Action Plan teams).

 
Performance Expectations:

By October 2012, compile a list of the remaining research needs in Area of Concerns with significant wet-weather flow pollution and municipal wastewater treatment issues, and suggest solutions.

Goals as set out in the Canada-Ontario Agreement are fully met.

A remedial action plan workshop was held in February 2012 with participants from Canadian federal and provincial governments, conservation authorities and the United States to analyze the current status of all remaining beneficial use impairments in each Area of Concern (AOC) and from that to determine the work required in each. This includes any wet-weather flow and municipal wastewater issues.

The workshop determined what work was needed in the AOCs for monitoring and analysis, habitat restoration and protection, contaminated sediment assessment, sewage treatment plants requiring upgrades to be done by the municipality, etc.

12 of the 13 goals in the 2007-2012 Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA) were met as of March 31, 2012.

The goal to complete priority actions for delisting four Areas of Concern (Nipigon Bay, Jackfish Bay, Wheatley Harbour, St. Lawrence River (Cornwall)) was not met. Meeting the goal requires upgrading the wastewater treatment plants in the Nipigon and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs, the funding for which is outside EC's mandate. The goal is expected to be achieved by 2013-2014.

3.1.9 Manage/deliver Great Lakes results federally- provincially, between the Government of Canada and the Province of Ontario. (EC, NRCan)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Each year, federal-provincial agencies signatory to the Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem take part in a comprehensive update of their work plans to deliver their agency's COA commitments. Work plans are assessed each year to determine whether they will meet the goals, results and commitments contained in the COA, the results of which work are presented to the COA Management Committee in the fall for direction and decision.

Progress reports for the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem are issued, setting out the current status in meeting the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem COA commitments. A final progress report is issued at the end of each Canada-Ontario Agreement to provide a conclusive report card on implementation of the Agreement.

 
Performance Expectations:

The results of the annual assessment of progress against work plans are to be completed by the fall of each year.

Canada-Ontario Agreement progress reports are issued regularly during the life of, and upon completion of each Canada-Ontario Agreement.

The annual assessment was reported to the Canada-Ontario Agreement Management Committee in March 2012, indicating that 94% of the commitments in the COA had been met. The remaining commitments were not met due to a variety of internal and external reasons. For instance, within EC, there was a refocusing of work on delivery of the Chemicals Management Plan, resulting in a reduced focus on a few COA commitments. Also, there are issues beyond the federal government's mandate, such as the necessity of upgrading sewage treatment plants by municipalities to reduce effluent loadings.

The interim COA Progress Report and public-friendly newsletter was issued in March 2011. The current Canada-Ontario Agreement expires on June 24, 2012, and a final COA Progress Report is anticipated to be released in 2012-2013.

3.1.10 Manage/deliver Great Lakes results binationally, between Canada and the United States through the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Management and delivery of the binational Great Lakes program is coordinated through the Great Lakes Binational Executive Committee (BEC). The BEC is a forum composed of senior representatives of Canadian and American federal, state and provincial agencies accountable for delivering programs and activities that respond to the terms of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA).

The BEC sets priorities and strategic direction for binational programming in the basin; coordinates binational programs and activities; responds to new and emerging issues in the Great Lakes; and provides advice, comment or other input for the preparation of various binational reports and presentations. The BEC is also responsible for overseeing mandatory reviews of the GLWQA.

The BEC meets twice a year, each spring and fall, alternating between locations in Canada and the United States.

 
Performance Expectations:
Binational issues in the Great Lakes are managed, strategic direction provided and decisions made by senior representatives of Canadian and American federal, state and provincial agencies that are accountable for delivering programs and activities that respond to the terms of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA).Work in 2011-2012 focused on negotiations and drafting of an amended Canada-United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, with two formal Canada-United States negotiating sessions, three meetings with targeted Great Lakes stakeholders, targeted sessions with First Nations and Métis organizations, and broader public engagement sessions taking place.

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3.3 Target: Fresh Water Quality - Complete federal actions to reduce pollutants and restore beneficial uses in hot spots in the St. Lawrence River by 2016.
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

3.3.1 Fund external work through Grants and Contribution Agreements so that communities can restore beneficial uses and improve environmental quality in their locality along the St. Lawrence. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources or/and Program 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

The Priority Intervention Zones (ZIP) Program will fund 14 groups to support local and regional collaboration among various stakeholders involved in the governance of the St. Lawrence and to engage them in improving its environmental quality.

Community action projects will be funded through contribution agreements with sector organizations under the Community Interaction Program (CIP). Funding will encourage the realization of community projects related to issues surrounding the Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence: biodiversity conservation, sustainable use and water quality improvement.

 
Performance Expectations:

Annual number of projects completed (Community Interaction Program indicator).

14 contribution accords reached with the organizations in 2011-2012 (ZIP Program indicator).

Thirteen projects were completed in 2011-2012.

Fourteen new agreements were signed, which will remain valid until 2015-2016.

3.3.2 Establish important cooperative partnerships between the federal and provincial governments and engage the appropriate public and stakeholder participation in order to achieve the vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable St. Lawrence River ecosystem. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

The Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence is currently being negotiated. Under this Agreement, the governments hope to implement projects on priority issues surrounding the St. Lawrence and implement cooperative and collaborative mechanisms to engage stakeholders in the river's governance. 
Performance Expectations:
Number of organizations (government departments / agencies and non-governmental organizations) participating in the implementation of the St. Lawrence Action Plan.

On November 29, 2011, the St. Lawrence Action Plan 2011-2026, which renews the Canada-Quebec collaboration on the St. Lawrence for 15 years, was signed by Minister Kent and Minister Arcand from the Quebec government. More information can be found at the following website.

18 federal and provincial departments and agencies are participating in the Agreement. Information is available on this website.

3.3.3 Release reports regularly on the State of the St. Lawrence and factsheets on environmental indicators. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

The Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence is currently being negotiated. Implementation and monitoring of the Agreement will be based on results identified in the 2011-2016 Action Plan for the three priority issues: biodiversity conservation, sustainable use and water quality improvement.

Under this Agreement, the intergovernmental Monitoring the State of the St. Lawrence River Program will be renewed. This program will give an overview of the state of the St. Lawrence by monitoring environmental indicators. The Overview of the State of the St. Lawrence River and factsheets on environmental indicators are published on a regular basis by partners of the Monitoring the State of the St. Lawrence River Program.

 
Performance Expectations:

The Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence will be announced in 2011 and information could be found later on this website.

Next edition of the Overview of the State of the St. Lawrence River to be published in 2014.

3 factsheets on environmental indicators published in 2011-2012 (by all federal partners in the Monitoring the State of the St. Lawrence Program) / Eight factsheets on various environmental indicators will be published in 2011 (by all federal partners in the Monitoring the State of the St. Lawrence River Program).

The Canada-Quebec Agreement on the St. Lawrence was announced in 2011. More information can be found at the following website.

Six factsheets were developed and three of them are ready to be published.

3.3.4 Conduct and coordinate research, prediction and monitoring activities in the St. Lawrence with other federal and provincial Departments and with local communities. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

The Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence is currently being negotiated. An intergovernmental environmental prediction program for the river will be implemented under the Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence. The Agreement will contain an appendix specifically regarding this program.

Implementation and monitoring of the Agreement will be based on results identified in the 2011-2016 Action Plan for the three priority issues: biodiversity conservation, sustainable use and water quality improvement.

The implementation of the Monitoring the State of the St. Lawrence River Program involves various partners from federal and provincial governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), including Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada, the Canadian Space Agency and Quebec's Ministère du Développement durable, de l'Environnement et des Parcs and Ministère des Ressources Naturelles et de la Faune. Together these efforts produce information on environmental indicators as well as editions of the Overview of the State of the St. Laurence River.

For more information, see the St. Lawrence Action Plan website and the website of the State of the St. Lawrence Monitoring Program.

 
Performance Expectations:
The indicators for the Monitoring of the State of the St. Lawrence River Program involve the production of 21 factsheets on those indicators as well as the release of the Overview of the State of the St. Lawrence River, as indicated in point 3.3.3.Six factsheets were developed and three of them are ready to be published.

3.3.5 Manage/deliver St. Lawrence results internally, within the Department, through the St. Lawrence Ecosystem Initiative. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

The Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence is currently being negotiated. Implementation and monitoring of the Agreement will be based on results identified in the 2011-2016 Action Plan for the three priority issues: biodiversity conservation, sustainable use and water quality improvement.

A number of EC programs and activities will contribute to the implementation of the Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence. EC's entire contribution will be monitored under the Department's St. Lawrence Ecosystem Initiative.

 
Performance Expectations:
Indicators will include a status update on 2011-2016 Action Plan projects and the Department's financial contribution in terms of projects carried out in said Action Plan.

Following the signing of the new agreement, the process of implementing the Agreement's projects was initiated. These projects are monitored by the issue committees on biodiversity, water uses and water quality, as well as the Monitoring of the State of the St. Lawrence River working group and the brand-new working group on environmental prediction, which has become an integral part of the agreement. For 2011-2012, it was reported to the Agreement Steering Committee that

  • of the 48 joint Canada-Quebec projects announced, 16 are proceeding very well; in fact, some achieved their expected deliverables during 2011-2012

  • however, 7 projects are experiencing major issues and 25 projects are having minor issues

Various EC branches are involved in 33 of the 48 projects.

3.3.6 Manage/deliver St. Lawrence results federally- provincially, between the Government of Canada and the Province of Quebec. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

The Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence is currently being negotiated. Implementation and monitoring of the Agreement will be based on results identified in the 2011-2016 Action Plan for the three priority issues: biodiversity conservation, sustainable use and water quality improvement.

An intergovernmental steering committee will be formed in the summer of 2011 to ensure annual monitoring of the results targeted in the Agreement.

 
Performance Expectations:
Indicators will include a status update on 2011-2016 Action Plan projects and the Department's financial contribution in terms of projects carried out in said Action Plan.

Following the signing of the new agreement, the process of implementing the Agreement's projects was initiated. These projects are monitored by the issue committees on biodiversity, water uses and water quality, as well as the Monitoring of the State of the St. Lawrence River working group and the brand-new Environmental Prediction working group, which has become an integral part of the agreement. For 2011-2012, it was reported to the Agreement Steering Committee that

  • of the 48 joint Canada-Quebec projects announced, 16 are proceeding very well, some of which have already achieved their expected deliverables during 2011-2012,

  • however, 7 projects are experiencing major issues and 25 projects are having minor issues.

Various EC Branches are involved in 33 of the 48 projects.

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3.4 Target: Fresh Water Quality - Reduce nutrient inputs into Lake Simcoe by 2012.
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

3.4.1 Manage/deliver Great Lakes results binationally, between Canada and the United States through the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). (EC)4

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Lake Simcoe is not one of the Great Lakes and is not included in Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement; therefore, this implementation strategy would not apply to Lake Simcoe.

Please note that this implementation strategy (3.4.1) is a duplicate of implementation strategy 3.1.10.

n/a

3.4.2 Provide financial and technical support through the Lake Simcoe Clean-Up Fund (LSCUF) to implement priority projects aimed at reducing phosphorus inputs, restoring fish and wildlife populations, and enhancing research and monitoring capacity that are essential to making progress in relation to the restoration of the Lake Simcoe Basin watershed. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

The Lake Simcoe Clean-Up Fund continues to support projects through contribution agreements in partnership with other stakeholders.

The Lake Simcoe Clean-up Fund provides funding for priority clean-up projects at the community, lake-wide and watershed-wide levels. Projects are led by community organizations, landowners, environmental non-governmental organizations, community groups, educational institutions, small- and medium-sized businesses, the provincial and municipal governments and the Lake Simcoe Region Conservation Authority.

The Fund provides financial and technical support to implement high-impact priority projects to reduce phosphorus inputs, rehabilitate habitats to achieve nutrient reductions, restore the coldwater fishery in Lake Simcoe, and enhance the research and monitoring capacity deemed essential for the restoration of Lake Simcoe and its watershed. Two funding rounds occur each year and the Fund is in place until March 31, 2012.

Examples of funded projects include

  • nearshore monitoring to better understand, evaluate, manage and potentially predict impacts to Lake Simcoe's nearshore zone;

  • research to improve methods for estimating the amount of phosphorous being deposited into the atmosphere;

  • data collection on phosphorous inputs from rural and urban sources; and

  • projects aimed at rehabilitating priority habitats in order to restore the health of the aquatic ecosystem and the coldwater fishery.

EC administers the fund in consultation with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the Province of Ontario, the Lake Simcoe Conservation Authority and other key stakeholders. For more information, please visit the Cleaning Up Lake Simcoe website

 
Performance Expectations:
Progress is being tracked through estimated phosphorus reductions, leveraged funding from other partners and accelerated adoption of best management practices.

EC coordinated and leveraged efforts to secure $28.5 million, including $6 million in cash and in-kind investments from individual property owners.

EC accelerated the adoption of best management practices (BMPs), which was accomplished through 91 habitat and non-point source improvement projects supporting implementation of over 350 agricultural and urban BMPs, which included third-party agreements completing over 600 additional restoration projects.

Overall, the initial estimates of the total phosphorus reduction achieved are 2.2 tonnes/year.

Some specific accomplishments of the projects were supported by the Clean-up Fund:

  • over 20,000 m of fencing were installed to restrict 1,296 livestock from watercourses

  • ten manure storage facilities were constructed to manage waste from 718 livestock

  • over 72,000 native trees, shrubs and grasses were planted in the watershed to stabilize shorelines and reduce phosphorus runoff

  • 110 septic systems were improved or upgraded

  • a sewage treatment plant optimization manual was developed that will be used across Ontario. Stormwater pond retrofits using wetlands and innovative technologies were implemented in several municipalities

The Lake Simcoe Clean-Up Fund ended on March 31, 2012. Budget 2012 announced that "the Government is working together with partners to protect and restore Canada's water resources for the benefit of all Canadians. Going forward, the Government will continue to pursue water quality and ecosystem health improvements in lakes and other bodies of water, such as Lake Winnipeg and Lake Simcoe."

3.4.3 Ongoing action to limit phosphates in laundry and dishwasher detergents. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Too many phosphates in our water can lead to an overabundance of blue-green algae. Though blue-green algae occur naturally, in large quantities they can emit a harmful level of toxins. This can lead to poor water quality and force the closure of beaches in warm weather. Restricting the level of phosphates in laundry and dishwasher detergent can have a positive impact on reducing the growth of blue-green algae in our rivers, lakes and streams. These reductions are key to improving water quality and protecting the health of Canadians.

The new phosphorus concentration limitations on household cleaning products came into force on July 1, 2010, and they reduce the phosphorus content in products manufactured or imported on or after that date. Information on the concentration limitations is available on the CEPA Environmental Registry.

 
Performance Expectations:
Develop compliance promotion products to increase awareness of the amended Phosphorus Concentration Regulations, which came into force in July 2010.

Compliance Promotion products were developed and delivered to regulatees in fiscal year 2011-2012.

Compliance Promotion activities will be conducted if needed, upon the results of the 2012-2013 Enforcement verifications.

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3.5 Target: Fresh Water Quality - By 2020, through strategic collaborations and by increasing scientific knowledge, contribute to the establishment of targets to reduce nutrients in Lake Winnipeg and its basin to support the sustainability of the lake.
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

3.5.1 Provide financial and technical support, through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund, to projects having concrete, demonstrable results to reduce pollutants and, in particular, nutrient loads, throughout the Lake Winnipeg Basin. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

The Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund provides funding support for cost-shared projects to reduce nutrients across the Lake Winnipeg watershed. Projects are based throughout Manitoba, Ontario, Saskatchewan and Alberta, and encompass agricultural beneficial management practices, wetland and riparian restoration, and demonstration projects related to nutrient abatement. 
Performance Expectations:
Seven or more contribution agreements developed for the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund in 2011-2012, for a total of 40 or more agreements implemented over the four-year lifespan of the Fund.

In 2011-2012, under the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund, nine new projects were funded in support of wetlands restoration, riparian enhancements, livestock beneficial management practices, and research into phosphorus recovery from wastewater sludge and the effective use of riparian zones. Funding for a sensitive habitat inventory and mapping of foreshore areas culminated in the development of recommended shoreline management guidelines in the southern basin of Lake Winnipeg.

A total of 41 agreements were signed over the four-year lifespan of the fund.

3.5.2 Conduct science activities required to understand the relationship between the ecology and nutrient cycling within Lake Winnipeg, and the sources and transport mechanisms for nutrients, in order to help inform the development of nutrient objectives and performance indicators for Lake Winnipeg. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

The Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative (LWBI) is focused primarily on science, in order to understand the gaps related to ecology and nutrient cycling and the sources and transport mechanisms for nutrients. The purpose of the science program is to provide the data and information needed to inform the development of nutrient objectives for the lake, as well as performance indicators to assess the health of the lake and watershed.

Science projects and activities are currently underway on Lake Winnipeg and major sub-basins, including the Red-Assiniboine and Winnipeg rivers, and Lake of the Woods, through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative Science Plan.

Activities include studies to characterize the physical, chemical and biological nature of Lake Winnipeg, including nutrient dynamics; sediment surveys; dissolved oxygen studies; stable isotope analyses to fingerprint nutrients; food web analyses; remote sensing; water quality, climate and hydrodynamic modeling; socio-economic analyses and case studies of ecological goods and services; and assessment of agricultural beneficial management practices for nutrient reduction.

 
Performance Expectations:

Information and research data will continue to be gathered and finalized throughout the 2011-2012 field season on Lake Winnipeg and in the watershed. An LWBI science synthesis and final report documenting science activities and findings will be compiled and published at the conclusion of the LWBI in March 2012.

Information and data gathered through the LWBI science program will be provided to Manitoba and other decision-makers following the conclusion of the LWBI in March 2012, to inform the development of appropriate nutrient objectives and performance indicators for Lake Winnipeg.

The final report for Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative (2008-2012) was prepared. The TB submission for Phase 2 is in preparation. The framework for establishing nutrient quality objectives was prepared with the government of Manitoba. Eighteen water quality indicators were established to report on the water quality of the lake and monitor changes. A special Lake Winnipeg issue of the Journal of Great Lakes Research was published.

The results of these science activities have been made available to Manitoba and other partners via the Lake Winnipeg Web portal.

3.5.3 Conduct monitoring activities for Lake Winnipeg and its sub-watersheds in order to help inform the development of nutrient objectives and performance indicators for Lake Winnipeg. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

A key component to the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative science program is the monitoring program. Water quality and biological monitoring occurs throughout the Lake and the watershed, including a review of monitoring networks (location, timing and sampling protocols amongst agencies) and reservoir nutrient sequestration studies. Monitoring contributes to the scientific knowledge needed by all levels of government to make sound decisions on Lake Winnipeg's health. 
Performance Expectations:

Finalize recommendations to optimize water quality networks in the Lake Winnipeg Basin to maximize efficiencies for federal and provincial networks and share this information with partner agencies.

Monitoring information and data from Lake Winnipeg and the watershed will continue to be gathered and finalized throughout the 2011-2012 field season and included in the LWBI science synthesis and final report to be completed and published at the end of the LWBI in March 2012.

A draft report was produced for an in-lake monitoring network, and a national risk-based approach was initiated to assess all river monitoring sites at the scale of the broader Lake Winnipeg watershed, including major rivers such as the Saskatchewan River (including North and South sections), the Red River and the Assiniboine River. Risk-based approach (RBA) documentation was completed, and a statistical tool (power analysis) was used to assess monitoring optimal sampling frequency looking for long-term water quality trends. A presentation to the Prairie Provinces Water Board (PPWB) members (including Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba) was made on March 2012, to be followed by a scientific discussion on the findings.

Monitoring information and data from Lake Winnipeg was collected during the 2011-2012 field season. The State of Lake Winnipeg Report was completed and published with Manitoba in summer 2011, and a science progress report had been drafted by March 2012.

3.5.4 Develop a single window web information portal to promote and enable data sharing and analysis with partners and other networks, in order to support research on Lake Winnipeg. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

EC is working with partners to develop and obtain data, provide guidance on modeling standards, build online modeling capacity, and further refine the prototype portal to meet the needs of stakeholders and users. 
Performance Expectations:

Continue to work with partners during 2011-2012 to develop and obtain data to populate the Web portal and further refine modeling capacity.

Long-term external portal hosting opportunities will be finalized in order to maintain the portal after the conclusion of the LWBI in March 2012.

The Lake Winnipeg Web portal was developed under the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative (LWBI) and transferred for ongoing management to the University of Manitoba. The portal continues to be populated by program partners and stakeholders.

3.5.5 The Lake Winnipeg Basin Management Office will coordinate and manage the activities of the Lake Winnipeg initiative, work with existing water governance bodies, explore the need for an overarching basin mechanism to cooperatively develop a basin-wide strategy, and provide a forum for communication. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

The Lake Winnipeg Basin Office was established to coordinate and oversee the three focus areas of the LWBI (science, stewardship and facilitating governance). The office works with existing water governance bodies, and is engaged in exploring opportunities to cooperatively develop a basin-wide strategy or otherwise facilitate governance and coordinate activities amongst partners throughout the transboundary. 
Performance Expectations:

The Lake Winnipeg Basin office will continue to oversee and manage the three focus areas of the LWBI (governance, stewardship and science) during the final 2011-2012 year of the LWBI.

EC will continue to participate on a number of other interprovincial and international water, science and governance mechanisms to facilitate coordination of government and stakeholder efforts across the watershed.

Evaluation of existing governance mechanisms will be completed and options for alternative models to facilitate integrated transboundary watershed management will be potentially explored.

The Lake Winnipeg Program Office continued to be the focus for management action with respect to governance, stewardship and science, and to provide a visible point of contact for partners.

EC continued to participate in the Prairie Provinces Water Board (PPWB), the International Red River Board (IRRB) of the International Joint Commission and its committees, the International Multi-Agency Work Group for the Lake of the Woods, the Canada-Manitoba MOU Steering Committee and its Science Sub-Committee. EC's role is to facilitate coordination of government and stakeholder efforts in the watershed.

Existing governance mechanisms were evaluated and considered to be an appropriate model to support the development of more integrated transboundary watershed management in the Lake Winnipeg basin.

3.5.6 Work with the Province of Manitoba to establish a Canada-Manitoba Agreement to provide for a long-term collaborative and coordinated approach between the two governments to ensure the sustainability and health of the Lake Winnipeg Basin. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

A five-year Canada-Manitoba Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Respecting Lake Winnipeg and the Lake Winnipeg Basin, developed under section 4 of the Canada Water Act, was signed in September 2010. The MOU formalizes the commitment of both governments to a long-term, collaborative and coordinated approach to support the sustainability and health of the Lake Winnipeg Basin. 
Performance Expectations:

EC will continue to co-chair the MOU steering committee, to oversee implementation of the MOU and provide oversight for the development of subsidiary arrangements in support of the MOU, including finalization of a science subsidiary arrangement in 2011-2012.

For further information about the LWBI, please visit EC's website at Cleaning Up Lake Winnipeg.

EC continued to co-chair the Canada-Manitoba MOU Steering Committee and the Science Subsidiary Arrangement under the MOU.

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3.6 Target: Fresh Water Quality - Achieve a value between 81-100 on each of the Water Quality and Soil Quality Agri-Environmental Performance Indices by March 21, 2030.
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

3.6.6 Identify opportunities to work within the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) to develop nutrient management approaches from non-point agricultural sources. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

By 2012 an assessment of the opportunities to exchange policy ideas and to develop options for collaboration will be completed and considered by the CCME Water Agenda Development Committee (WADC). Based on the outcomes of this scoping exercise, further collaborative work on nutrients may be undertaken. Intergovernmental collaboration contributes to developing a harmonized approach to managing agricultural nutrients and improving the water quality agri-environmental performance index. 
Performance Expectations:
By 2012, the assessment will be completed and the CCME WADC will recommend future intergovernmental collaboration opportunities to the Environmental Planning and Protection Committee.Work with the CCME Water Management Committee (renamed from WADC) on nutrient management is ongoing. A number of webinars were held in 2012 to share information and enhance progress on nutrient management.

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3.7 Target: Reduce Risks associated with wastewater effluent by 2020 in collaboration with provinces and territories.
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

3.7.1 Work collaboratively with provinces to conduct and disseminate research on wastewater effluent. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment's (CCME's) Canada-wide Strategy for the Management of Municipal Wastewater Effluent identified the need to improve science and research coordination. The CCME is proposing to establish a science and research coordination body for wastewater effluent and biosolids to track research; identify priorities for future study; and disseminate information on research results to prevent duplication and promote collaboration among researchers.

Coordinated science and research would provide a sound basis for risk management decisions and thereby contribute to Target 3.7, Fresh Water Quality - Reduce risks associated with wastewater effluent by 2020.

 
Performance Expectations:

Establishment of the Science and Research Coordination Body.

Development of the Canada-wide research agenda.

Completion of the review of the federal, provincial, territorial, municipal governments and other stakeholders' existing research agendas related to biosolids and wastewater.

Initiation of consultations on best mechanisms to help meet the national scientific research and information dissemination needs that are identified.

The Science and Research Coordination Body was established with a steering committee with representatives from EC, the Canadian Water Network, CCME, Canadian Water and Wastewater Association and Ontario's Ministry of the Environment.

The National Wastewater Research Agenda was completed in March 2012 and was promoted through various meetings and workshops.

The Canadian Water Network is taking the lead to identify the top one or two research needs from the agenda and to explore funding opportunities to establish a consortium of interested users to carry out the research.

3.7.2 Implement the federal aspects of the CCME strategy for the management of municipal wastewater effluent in Canada through effluent regulations under the Fisheries Act and through agreements with provinces and territories by 2012. Work with the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Quebec, and Newfoundland and Labrador to complete policy analysis and research for minimum performance standards for wastewater effluent for the far north. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

The proposed Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (WSER) were developed under the Fisheries Act and published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, for public comment in 2010. When finalized, the WSER will be the federal government's primary instrument to implement the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment's (CCME's) Canada-wide Strategy (endorsed February 2009). The federal regulations will contribute to harmonizing the regulatory framework and would include a regulatory baseline with effluent quality limits equivalent to secondary wastewater treatment.

As part of implementing the CCME Strategy, bilateral agreements are to be negotiated with the provinces and Yukon to establish roles and responsibilities for the administration of the wastewater regulations. The agreements would clarify roles and responsibilities with respect to authorization officers, regulatory reporting, data exchange, compliance promotion, and inspections and enforcement activities.

The Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations are aimed at reducing, in collaboration with the provinces, risks from the deposit of wastewater and as such contribute to Target 3.7.

 
Performance Expectations:

Conduct field surveys of the selected Far North sewage treatment facilities with respect to their treatment performance and opportunities for optimization. Most of this work will focus on sewage lagoons and effluent polishing wetlands.

Prepare a report on the performance of monitored sewage treatment facilities, in the context of the Canadian Council of the Ministers of the Environment (CCME) strategy, and assess the feasibility of computer modeling of such facilities.

Publish the final regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part II, targeted by the end of spring 2011.

Establish bilateral administrative agreements with each province and Yukon by the end of 2012.

Engage stakeholders on the standards for the North by April 2012.

EC conducted field surveys of wastewater lagoons in the Far North with respect to their treatment performance. The research was completed in 2011-2012.

EC is preparing a report on the performance of the monitored facilities; the report is expected to be completed in 2012-2013.

Following the publication of the proposed Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (WSER), EC extensively engaged provincial, municipal and other stakeholders in 2011-2012. The regulations have been adjusted accordingly and the final regulations are expected to be published in Canada Gazette, Part II, in 2012.5

EC initiated formal negotiations with the provinces and Yukon on agreements to streamline administration of regulations for wastewater effluent.

Stakeholders were engaged on standards and a regulatory regime for the North at a workshop in March 2012.

3.7.3 Ensure compliance with performance standards for higher risk wastewater effluents by 2020. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

The proposed Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations were developed under the Fisheries Act and published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, for public comment in 2010. When finalized, the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations will be the federal government's primary instrument to implement the CCME's Canada-wide Strategy (endorsed February 2009). The federal regulations will contribute to harmonizing the regulatory framework and would include a regulatory baseline with effluent quality limits equivalent to secondary wastewater treatment. For wastewater systems required to upgrade existing, or build new, infrastructure to meet the effluent quality standards, those situations posing the highest risk would be required to come into compliance by 2020.

The Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations are aimed at reducing, in collaboration with the provinces, risks from the deposit of wastewater and as such contribute to Target 3.7.

 
Performance Expectations:
Publication of final regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part II, targeted for spring 2011. This will create performance measures that are applicable after 2020.Following the publication of the proposed Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (WSER), EC extensively engaged provincial, municipal and other stakeholders in 2011-2012.The regulations have been adjusted accordingly and the final regulations are expected to be published in Canada Gazette, Part II, in 2012.

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3.8 Target: Marine Water Quality - Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the marine environment posed by pollution form land-based activities.
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

3.8.1 Fund external work through Grants and Contribution Agreements so that communities can restore beneficial uses and improve environmental quality in their locality along the St. Lawrence. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.3: Sustainable Ecosystems

Six of 14 ZIP Program groups and Strategies Saint-Laurent have marine zone activities to encourage local and regional collaboration among the various stakeholders involved in the St. Lawrence Plan and involve them in improving the quality of its environment.

Community action projects will be funded through contribution agreements with sector organizations under the Community Interaction Program (CIP). The funding will support community projects associated with the issues surrounding the Canada-Quebec Agreement Pertaining to the St. Lawrence: biodiversity conservation, sustainable use and water quality improvement.

 
Performance Expectations:

Annual number of projects completed (Community Interaction Program indicator).

6 contribution agreements with organizations in 2011-2012 (ZIP Program indicator).

Thirteen projects were completed.

Fourteen agreements were signed, and are valid until 2015-2016.

3.8.3 Provide advice on garbage, ballast water, sewage and other marine pollution to support Canadian positions in international commitments. (TC, EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

EC provides advice to TC on issues that involve both disposal at sea and marine pollution from ships, preventing gaps in regulation and providing consistent environmental protection.

By participating in the development and implementation of best practices or global regulation, EC's support of Transport Canada has an impact on ocean sustainability with respect to marine pollution from ships.

 
Performance Expectations:
Provide support towards the development of Canadian positions on the issue and management of ship-based garbage (Garbage Annex of MARPOL), and support the advance of these positions at the Marine Environmental Protection Committee of the International Maritime Organization and with Transport Canada domestically.

EC provided advice to Transport Canada through input to the review of Annex V (Garbage) of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution From Ships, 1973 as modified by the Protocol of 1978 (MARPOL).

EC also provided advice to the Canadian Delegation to the Marine Environmental Protection Committee (TC Lead).

3.8.4 Collect required data to support International Maritime Organization, the United Nations Environmental Programme and other domestic and international organizations. (TC, EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

EC and Fisheries and Oceans Canada work collaboratively to coordinate the development of Canada's national report in support of its commitment to the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-Based Activities (GPA-Marine). The report is submitted to the United Nations Environment Program once every five years prior to an international meeting of GPA signatories. The next meeting is expected to occur in fall 2011.

The development of Canada's national report on the Global Program of Action provides an opportunity to take stock of how effectively federal, provincial and territorial policies and programs are helping to reduce the risk to Canadians and impacts on the marine environment posed by pollution from land-based activities. It is, however, only one example of how data is being collected and used to support domestic and international organizations.

 
Performance Expectations:

Coordinate the development of Canada's national report on the Global Program of Action.

Submit Canada's national report prior to the 3rd Intergovernmental Review of the Global Program of Action in fall 2011.

The Third Intergovernmental Review (IGR-3) of the Global Programme of Action (GPA) for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities took place in Manila, Philippines from 25-27 January 2012.

EC coordinated the development of all materials for the IGR meeting, including Canada's national report on the GPA.

The Canadian delegation delivered Canada's statement during the high-level segment of the meeting, highlighting achievements in implementing the GPA over the past five years since IGR-2.

3.8.9 Advance positions that can influence global rules and practices on dumping waste at sea and other marine pollution matters. (EC, TC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

Canada is a Party to the London Protocol, a global treaty on disposal at sea. The treaty sets assessment and monitoring goals globally. EC leads on this treaty for Canada.

Canada's participation internationally has an impact on the domestic and global ocean sustainability with respect to disposal at sea by influencing best practices or global regulation.

 
Performance Expectations:
Develop Canadian positions and advance them at the London Protocol. Canada expects to achieve at least 50% of its positions.In 2011-2012, Canada was successful in advancing its positions at both the Meeting of the Parties of the London Protocol and at the Scientific Groups meeting of the London Protocol and Convention. Canada met its objectives for 50% of issues and partially achieved the other 50%, with the work ongoing. Canada set positions on 4 main issues: compliance, ocean fertilization regulation, spoilt cargo management, and rules for exporting CO2 to sub-seabed geological formations for storage.

3.8.13 Ensure that 90% of CEPA 1999 disposal at sea permits are issued within 120 days. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

The Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 requires an application for disposal at sea and the Minister of the Environment is required to monitor representative disposal sites where material is permitted for disposal. Each permit is granted following a detailed assessment, and the permit sets conditions to protect the marine environment and human health.

This service requirement for permit assessment supports the larger sustainability in Target 3.9 by ensuring that the assessment is consistent, conducted in a timely manner, and thus provides a sound basis for monitoring.

Please visit the Disposal at Sea website for more information.

 
Performance Expectations:
Service standard of 90% of permits issued within 120 days will be met on an ongoing basis.85% of permits were issued within 120 days of receipt of the application. The Disposal at Sea (DAS) Permit program did not meet the service standard in 2011-2012, due largely to delays in the Pacific and Yukon Region s a result of sensitive killer whale habitat. EC has been working with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) to develop standard joint operating procedures to facilitateDAS permitting. These procedures are in use on an interim basis and improvements have been made in the delivery ofDAS permits.

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3.10 Target: Drinking Water Quality - Increase the percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable water and wastewater facility risk ratings by 20136.
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

3.10.9 Develop and continuously update technical guidance protocols, such as the Protocol for Safe Drinking Water in First Nations Communities and the Protocol for Wastewater Treatment and Disposal in First Nations Communities. (INAC, EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

This will be reported by INAC.n/a

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3.12 Target: Chemicals Management - Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by harmful substances as a result of decreased environmental concentrations and human exposure to such substances.
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

3.12.1 Federal custodians plan and undertake assessment and remediation/risk management activities at contaminated sites for which they are responsible in order to reduce human health and ecological risks at higher priority sites. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) is a cost-shared program that helps federal custodians address contaminated sites for which they are responsible. The primary objective of this program is to address the risks that these sites pose to human health and the environment and to reduce the associated financial liability. The program has the complementary objectives of supporting other socio-economic outcomes, such as the training and employment of Canadians and promotion of innovative technologies.

EC's responsibilities include providing expert advice to other federal custodians on the issue of ecological risk reduction.

After a site is assessed and the need to address the contamination confirmed, a remediation or risk management plan is used to explore the various alternatives and identify the preferred option to reduce the risk to human health and the environment. The chosen remediation or risk management method is designed to address the unique conditions of the site. Common remediation activities involve reducing exposure to contaminants by removing, destroying or containing them.

By assessing sites suspected of being contaminated, the federal government is able to more accurately estimate human health and environmental risks. Remediation of contaminated sites is designed to reduce risks to human health and the environment from contaminants through the clean-up and risk management of sites.

 
Performance Expectations:
Performance indicators are being developed for this implementation strategy and will be available following the finalization of the Performance Management Strategy for the renewed program. Targets will be set following the 2011 federal budget and reporting will begin in 2011-2012.

Performance indicator for the FCSAP program overall:

Remediation or risk management plans will be implemented at the 368 highest-priority federal sites by 2015-2016, with annual assessment of progress.

Performance achieved:

Remediation or risk management plans were implemented at 32 sites in 2011-2012 under the FCSAP, which represents 9% of the five-year target. Performance will be monitored annually to determine whether the target is likely to be met.

Performance indicator specific to EC:

Implementation of remediation or risk management plans will be completed at 2 of the Department's highest-risk sites by 2015-2016, with annual assessment of progress.

Performance achieved:

To date, EC has completed assessment work at 7 of its 16 highest-risk sites where risk reduction plans were expected to be completed by 2015-2016. Results of the assessment work concluded that no further action was required at these 7 sites. EC plans to complete assessment and remediation work (where required) at the remaining 9 sites by the end of 2015-2016 fiscal year.

3.12.2 Guidance and program policies developed by the program secretariat and the expert support departments are used by federal custodians in the program implementation activities. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

EC will sustain the capability to review site classification to ensure funding is directed to highest-risk sites and to manage sites with a focus on reducing the risk to human health and the environment.

Expert advice ensures that custodians adopt a scientifically credible and consistent approach to the assessment of human health and ecological risks across the program. A sustainability framework is currently being developed to help custodians integrate sustainable decision making into the management of contaminated sites.

 
Performance Expectations:
Performance indicators are being developed for this implementation strategy and will be available following the finalization of the Performance Management Strategy for the renewed program. Targets will be set following the 2011 federal budget and reporting will begin in 2011-2012.

FCSAP Secretariat and EC's Expert Support produced or delivered 18 guidance, tools or training items in 2011-2012. Two of these items are described below.

A scoping study for a FCSAP sustainability strategy and plan was drafted with the implementation of activities for the first year of the strategy to occur in 2012-2013. Sustainable approaches to remediation consider future environmental and socio-economic effects of a remediation strategy, and how to maintain the benefits of remediation long-term.7

Public Works and Government Services Canada and EC completed the Sustainable Development Analysis Tool to assist federal custodians in choosing the most sustainable remediation or risk management solution for their contaminated sites.

3.12.3 In 2010-2011, site assessments will be undertaken on an estimated 1500 projects by 15 federal custodians in total while an estimated 500 remediation/risk management projects will be implemented by 17 custodians in total. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

This implementation strategy has been completed and will be reported in the 2010-2011 Departmental Performance Report.

All future work with federal contaminated sites is outlined in the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan.

In 2010-2011 (as stated in the implementation strategy), site assessments were undertaken at 2,700 sites while remediation or risk management occurred at 630 sites belonging to 14 federal custodians.

3.12.4 Assess 100% of existing commercial substances as identified under the Chemicals Management Plan for risks to human health and/or the environment (100% of total of 4300 by 2020). (EC, HC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

The Government of Canada is committed to addressing all of the substances that have been identified as being a priority. Under CEPA 1999, EC and Health Canada have identified these priorities though the categorization of all substances in commerce , as included on the Domestic Substances List. The assessment and management of substances is addressed through a range of activities best suited to the level of priority, nature and use of the substances, and the types of risks they may pose to Canadians or their environment.

To support assessment and management activities, the strategy further involves research and monitoring activities, including updating information on the commercial status of these substances. There is also international collaboration relating to data sharing and the shared development of assessment and management approaches.

This includes priority setting, assessment and related research and monitoring, which identifies substances of concern and the nature of risks that they pose to Canadians and their environment, allowing risk management to focus on implementing appropriate measures for reduction of those risks.

 
Performance Expectations:

Close to 1,200 (28%) of the existing commercial substances under the Chemicals Management Plan will be assessed for risk to human health and/or the environment.

Risk management measures will be implemented for those substances identified as being of concern to human health or the environment.

Identification of the next round of assessment and associated timelines, and initiation of assessments.

By the end of 2011-2012, 1,092 (25%) of the 1200 substances had been addressed Substances were considered to be addressed once a formal decision was made that, pending new information, no further assessment work was required on a substance of concern. Of the 1092 substances:

  • 144 were determined or proposed to require risk management actions

  • 283 were determined or proposed to not currently pose a risk but would be subject to the significant new activity provisions

  • 665 were determined or proposed to not pose a risk and require no further action

The cumulative total number of substances addressed to the end of 2011-2012 (including previous years) is 1,092, which represents approximately 25% of all substances under theCMP.

In 2011-2012, a total of 655 substances were considered to have been addressed, including 22 substances in the Challenge, 28 substances from the petroleum stream sector approach, 545 substances using the rapid screening approach, and 60 in other initiatives under the Chemicals Management Plan. Of the substances addressed, 10 were found or proposed to be found to meet the definition of "toxic" under CEPA 1999.

3.12.5 Assess 100% of new substances, for which EC has been notified by industry of their intended manufacture or import, to determine if they are suspected of being toxic within the timelines in the regulation or established services standards. (EC, HC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

Any person who intends to import or manufacture a new substance in Canada must submit a notification to EC prior to importing or manufacturing the substance. Once the notification is received, EC and Health Canada are responsible for assessing the substance assessing the substance within the prescribed regulatory timeline to determine whether the proposed uses of the substance could lead to its posing any risk to human health or the environment.

Actions taken under the New Substances program ensure that new substances are not allowed onto the market if their introduction would result in risks to the environment or human health.

Approximately 500 new substance notifications are processed on an annual basis. Of these 500 assessments, approximately 25 Significant New Activity notices and 10 Ministerial Conditions are issued annually to restrict the use of these substances for other activities, or to mitigate potential risks.

 
Performance Expectations:
100% of new substances, intended for manufacture and/or import into Canada, for which notification by industry has been received by EC in 2011-2012, will be assessed within the prescribed regulatory timeline, to determine whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming "toxic" within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999).100% of new substances were addressed with the prescribed legislative timeline.

3.12.7 Ensure at least one risk management measure is in place within the legally mandated timeframes for 100% of substances added to the List of Toxic Substances within. (EC,HC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.1: Substances and Waste Management

Substances found to be "toxic" under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) and added to the Schedule 1 must have a proposed instrument to establish or control actions for managing the substance published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, within two years of the recommendation that the substance be added to Schedule I. Within 18 months of the publication of the proposed instrument in the Canada Gazette, Part I, the final instrument must be published in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

Information regarding the risk management measures in place for the substances on the List of Toxic Substances can be found on the Chemical Substances website and EC's CEPA Environmental Registry.

Under the Chemicals Management Plan, the Challenge initiative to industries and other stakeholders was developed to address approximately 200 chemicals identified as high priorities for action due to their potential to cause harm to human health and/or the environment. The Challenge divides these chemicals into 12 batches. Approximately every 3 months, a new batch of chemicals is released for comment and information gathering. The information gathered is used to feed into evidence-based decisions when assessing risks to human health and the environment, and developing measures to reduce these risks.

 
Performance Expectations:
All substances added to the List of Toxic Substances will have at least one risk management measure in place within the legally mandated time frames.

In 2011-2012, proposed risk management instruments were published for 10 of 11 substances listed on Schedule 1 within the required timelines.

Final risk management instruments were published for 8 of 8 substances listed on Schedule 1 within the required timelines.

3.12.8 Deliver compliance promotion activities for new instruments developed under CEPA 1999. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 3.3: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution

Compliance promotion relates to activities that are undertaken to increase the awareness and the understanding of new risk management instruments developed under Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999). Through these activities, information is provided regarding the compliance requirements, the benefits of complying with the law, as well as, the consequences of non-compliance.

The approach to compliance promotion is collaborative and coordinated across the department's programs and regions and with the Enforcement Branch of EC. It is achieved using various tools and approaches such as website postings, letters and emails, brochures, site visits, responses to inquiries and information sessions.

 
Performance Expectations:
Conduct compliance promotion activities to increase Stakeholder awareness for new regulations related to substances added after 2009 to the CEPA 1999 List of Toxic Substances.

Compliance promotion activities have been delivered for instruments managing the risk of toxic substances added to the List of Toxic Substances prior to 2003 such as VOC, tetrachloroethylene, PCBs, fuel-containing toxic substances, mercury, PFOS and its salts, etc.

No new instruments controlling substances added to the CEPA 1999 List of Toxic Substances after 2009 were developed and promoted in 2011-2012.

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4. Goal: Water Availability - Enhance information to ensure that Canadians can manage and use water resources in a manner consistent with the sustainability of the resources.

4.1 Target: Water Resource Management and Use - Promote the conservation and wise use of water to affect a 30% reduction or increased efficiency in water use in various sectors by 2025 (based on 2009 water use levels).
FSDS Implementation StrategiesDescription of the Implementation Strategy and Relationship to FSDS Goals and Targets and Performance ExpectationsPerformance Achieved

4.1.1 Provide non-financial support for a partnership consortium that will implement a water labeling and certification program to Canadians. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

WaterSense-labelled products and fixtures will be promoted to Canadians in general and to federal facilities, other levels of government, industry and the retail sector in particular, so that consumers and managers can make responsible decisions relating to efficient water use. 
Performance Expectations:
Starting in 2012-2013, the performance of the program will be documented by EC in its annual reports of partner activities, successes, challenges and other feedback including data, such as retail sales of WaterSense products.Data on the type of promotional activities conducted by EC in 2011 was reported to the U.S.EPA. This data helped the U.S.EPA track progress and program achievements, identified potential case studies, and improved the WaterSense program.

4.1.2 Enhance and expand effective partnerships that enable the voluntary and regulatory means of managing the demand for water towards its sustainability. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

EC collaborates with federal colleagues, research institutions, other jurisdictions, and environmental non-governmental organizations to promote sustainable water management tools and mechanisms, including information on water pricing, modeling and incentive programs. 
Performance Expectations:
Metrics are under development and would include the number and variety of partners and the number and reach of promotional material developed to inform Canadians.

EC collaborated with a variety of partners to promote sustainable water management. For instance, other members of the Canadian WaterSense Consortium represent other federal government departments, 4 provincial ministries, 3 municipal governments, 4 ENGOs, 4 trade/industry associations, 3 technical consultants and an academic organization.

The Water pages of EC's website were visited 457,375 times during 2011-2012 - an average of 1,250 times per day. Of the visitors, 60% were in Canada and the remaining 40% were international (primarily in the United States, France and India).

Discussions were held with EC federal facilities to promote water efficiency in buildings and integrate the WaterSense labelling and certification program into the new building and retrofits.

The WaterSense labelling and certification program was integrated in the retrofit of Place Vincent Massey which houses many Environment Canada employees and the construction of the Place Vincent Massey Annex.

4.1.4 Improve knowledge of water, its nature, extent, availability, sector use and best management practices such as Integrated Watershed Management to Canadians (EC, NRCan)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

A variety of Web- and print-based information is available to Canadians regarding water science, extent, availability, sector use and best management practices. The following is a list of some of the websites:

  • The Water website is the most comprehensive site regarding EC's role in water management.

  • The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) initiative reports on environmental indicators that track the long-term trends for issues of key concern to Canadians, including national, regional and local changes in water levels.

  • Historical water level and streamflow data is available from Canada's national HYDAT (Hydroclimatological Data Retrieval Program) archives.

  • Real-time and historical (archived) water levels and streamflow is publicly available from the Water Survey of Canada Real-Time Data.

 
Performance Expectations:
Analyse the Web metrics of the Water section of EC's website to indicate reach and use of comprehensive and timely information on water-related issues designed to improve knowledge of water.The Water pages of EC's website were visited 457,375 times during 2011-2012 - an average of 1,250 times per day. Of the visitors, 60% were in Canada and the remaining 40% were international (primarily in the United States, France and India).

4.1.5 Provide web and print based information on the science and knowledge of water to Canadians in a comprehensive and timely manner to enable responsible decision. (EC, NRCan)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

A variety of Web- and print-based information is available to Canadians regarding water science, extent, availability, sector use and best management practices. The following is a list of some of the websites:

  • The Water website is the most comprehensive site regarding EC's role in water management.

  • The Water S&T website provides access to information on water research (Research), water science expertise (Water S&T Experts), Key Water S&T Reports, and the S&T Into Action series documenting the benefits of EC's water research programs and projects to Canadians.

  • The Water Science News is e-published and disseminated externally every two months and provides updates on current water research and new journal articles published by EC scientists.

  • The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) initiative reports on environmental indicators that track the long-term trends for issues of key concern to Canadians, including national, regional and local changes in water levels.

  • Historical water level and streamflow data is available from Canada's national HYDAT (Hydro-climatological Data Retrieval Program) archive.

  • Real-time and historical (archived) water levels and streamflow is publicly available from the Water Survey of Canada Real-Time Data website.

 
Performance Expectations:

Analyse the Web metrics of the Water section of EC's website to indicate the reach and use of comprehensive and timely information on water-related issues designed to improve knowledge of water.

Number of site visits to the Freshwater Web pages of the EC website.

Number of site visits to the S&T Water pages of EC.

Growth in requests for a subscription to Water Science News.

The Water website was visited 457,375 times during 2011-2012 - an average of 1,250 times per day. Of the visitors, 60% were in Canada and the remaining 40% were international, primarily in the United States, France and India.

4.1.6 Continue work on collection of hydrometric data through the Water Survey of Canada. (EC, HC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

The Water Survey of Canada is the national authority responsible for the collection, interpretation and dissemination of standardized water resource data and information in Canada. In partnership with the provinces, territories and other agencies, the Water Survey of Canada operates over 2,500 active hydrometric gauges across the country. For further information, please visit EC's water survey website. 
Performance Expectations:
100% availability of preliminary water level and discharge data available via the Internet for real-time hydrometric stations within 24 hours of occurrence.Operationalization of the Hydrometric Workstation has afforded access to preliminary water-level and discharge data available via the Internet for 95% of real-time hydrometric stations within 24 hours of occurrence.

4.1.7 Conduct research and modeling with respect to water use and management particularly in the design and implementation of integrated decision systems such as Integrated Watershed Management. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

Use of coupled and ensemble modelling approaches for water cycle and environmental prediction to better inform water resource management decision making - this is being conducted by MSC and S&T (e.g. operationalizing the model for the Upper Great Lakes will be completed next year).

We also develop and test a numerical water analysis model for the integrated assessment of water use and availability at the watershed level, and apply the water analysis model to areas of federal interest. In addition, a numerical model (RIVICE) for the analysis of flooding due to river ice jams will be developed and tested and also applied to areas of federal interest.

The development of water models will provide a tool for developing solutions for wise water management and support the decision system for assessing impacts of changes in water use.

 
Performance Expectations:

Testing and documentation of a new version of the Water Analysis Model.

Initial Water Analysis Model applications completed and documented for the Okanagan River Basin and South Saskatchewan River Basin.

First version of RIVICE tested by provincial and private sector collaborators.

Testing and documentation of the updated version of the Water Availability Model is complete. A comprehensive reference manual for the model will be completed by March 29, 2013.

The application of the Water Availability Model to the entire Okanagan basin was completed and the results were presented to the Okanagan Water Use and Supply Study. Testing of the Numerical River Ice Model (RIVICE model) was completed in conjunction with Manitoba Water Stewardship. Model documentation is nearing completion, which is targeted for March 29, 2013. Two papers on model application were also published.

4.1.8 Conduct surveys on water use such as the Municipal Water and Wastewater Survey (EC) and the CESI Industrial Water Use Survey, Survey of Drinking Water Plants and Agriculture Water Use Survey. (Stats Can, EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

The four surveys assist in establishing 2009 sectoral water use baseline data. The 2009 Municipal Water and Wastewater Survey data has been collected and is currently undergoing quality control and analysis.

The CESI surveys are conducted by StatsCan and managed by EC. However, to be verified with StatsCan, the 2009 industrial water survey collection period is finished and publication is scheduled for early 2012. The 2010 Agriculture water survey collected information for the 2010 growing season and data will become available this spring 2011. The next survey of drinking water plants is scheduled for launch in early 2012 and will collect 2011 information.

The Municipal Water and Wastewater Survey assists in tracking progress of the FSDS Target 4.1 and Goal 4.

 
Performance Expectations:
Quality control and analysis of 2009 Municipal Water and Wastewater Survey; data will be publically available by end of year 2011.The Municipal Water and Wastewater data was released in August 2011. Water use and pricing reports have been published.

4.1.9 Continue the development and implementation of Water Availability Indicators. (HC, EC, NRCan)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

To ensure continued sustainability of freshwater for human use and ecosystem support, water availability status in Canada must be tracked. "Water availability" refers to the volume of water in our rivers compared with the amount of water we are using. A water availability indicator (WAI) is currently under development. 
Performance Expectations:

Publication of the water availability indicator for all sub-drainage areas in Canada.

Water demand and availability ratio for the Mixed Grassland Case Study will be reported in the Clean Water Act annual report to be released in 2011.

The water availability indicator by sub-drainage areas in Canada for 2005 and 2007 was published in the 2010-2011 Canada Water Act Annual Report.

Water demand and availability ratio for the Mixed Grassland Case Study was reported in the 2009-2010 Canada Water Act Annual Report.

4.1.11 Conduct hydrological and hydraulic studies in support of key environmental projects/programs of federal interest (e.g. oil sands). (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

Hydrological and hydratic studies support the assessment of surface water quantity issues related to the wise use of water in specific watersheds and international river improvements and environmental assessment of the Major Projects Management Office infrastructure projects in areas of federal interest (e.g. oil sands). 
Performance Expectations:

Completion of the International River Improvements Act (IRIA) licensing process for the Long Lake Hydro project in British Columbia.

Publication of five Major Projects Management Office project assessments.

Licensing of the Long Lake Hydro project in British Columbia was expected in 2012-2013.

Reviewed hydro technical assessments and contributed input to support the departmental position on environmental assessments for 6 major resource projects.

4.1.12 Develop appropriate tools to ensure federal leadership in water efficiency in the Federal House. (EC)

Alignment with the 2011-2012 PAA:

Program 1.2: Water Resources

Develop, with federal colleagues, a federal specification for retrofitting or building new facilities, including a water efficiency objective and specifications.

Promote with administrators of federal infrastructure funding programs (Federation of Canadian Municipalities and Industry Canada) the need to include water efficiency requirements as criteria for funding allocations.

 
Performance Expectations:
EC will provide annual reports to EC's senior management on activities, successes and challenges.

Discussions were held with EC federal facilities to promote water efficiency in buildings and to integrate the WaterSense labelling and certification program into other new building and retrofit projects.

The WaterSense labelling and certification program was integrated into the retrofit of Place Vincent Massey (PVM) and the construction of the PVM Annex.

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4 This implementation strategy does not contribute to the FSDS Target 3.4 as Lake Simcoe is not one of the Great Lakes and is not included in the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

5 The Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations are published in Canada Gazette, Part II in July 2012.

6 Drinking water on reserve remains a primary focus of AANDC's current Key Performance Indicators mapping pilot, and targets will be revised based on the pilot's recommendations.

7 In the context of FCSAP, sustainable approaches to remediation consider the environmental and socio-economic effects of a remediation strategy, resulting in an optimization of benefits

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