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Planning for a Sustainable Future:
A Federal Sustainable Development Strategy for Canada
2013–2016

Sustainable Development Office
Environment Canada

November 2013


Theme III. Protecting nature and Canadians

The image of the letter N above a leaf represents Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians

Why it matters

Conserving Canada's natural landscapes and marine areas, protection and recovery of its wild species, and protecting Canadians from exposure to harmful substances are essential to Canada's environmental, social and economic well-being. Proper management of chemical substances is essential for protecting the health of Canadians and the environment, as well as reducing future costs associated with water treatment, clean-up of contaminated sites, and treatment of illnesses related to chemical exposure (Government of Canada, 2010). Protecting species and their habitats helps preserve biodiversity--the variety of plants, animals, and other life in Canada. Biodiversity, in turn, promotes the ability of Canada's ecosystems to perform valuable ecosystem services such as releasing oxygen to the atmosphere while absorbing carbon dioxide (a major greenhouse gas), filtering drinking water, enabling new plants to grow through pollination, and capturing the sun's energy, which is vital to all life. When ecosystem services are compromised, economic and health impacts such as lower agricultural productivity and lower-quality drinking water can result, raising costs for Canadians, industry and governments. Further, without protection and conservation of natural areas, Canadians would have fewer opportunities to connect with and enjoy our country's natural beauty, and to engage in outdoor recreational activities.

Canada's natural resources are a major contributor to economic activity. Industries that directly rely on a sustainable natural environment include forestry, agriculture, fisheries and aquaculture. In 2011, Canada's forest sector, which includes forestry and logging, pulp and paper, and wood product manufacturing, accounted for about 1.9% of Canada's total GDP. It also provided direct employment for approximately 235,900 Canadians (Natural Resources Canada, 2012). In 2010, $7.4 billion was the approximate value of the products and outputs of the commercial fishing, aquaculture and fish processing industries with some 85,000 employed in these industries across Canada (Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 2013). Parks Canada places contribute $3.3 billion annually to the Canadian economy, sustaining more than 41,000 jobs in hundreds of communities across the country.

While both forests and fish represent renewable resources, inadequate management of these resources can contribute to their depletion and threaten the viability of the sectors that depend on them. Lack of attention to the sustainable management of these resources can also threaten the biodiversity and environmental well-being of Canada's oceans, lakes, rivers and forested areas.

The second cycle of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) enhances the strategy's link between nature, the economy and society. Including a target on chemicals management in this theme highlights an important connection between human and environmental health, and brings together federal actions in this area in one place. The second cycle also broadens the coverage of actions under the government's goal on responsible development of Canada's biological resources so that it is relevant to a broader range of resources and sectors, for example by including a target on sustainable agriculture. It also updates the strategy's target and indicators related to environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies to reflect and measure the economic and social impacts of these events.

What others are doing

In Canada, the federal government, provinces, territories and Aboriginal groups work together to protect Canadian landscapes, seascapes, ecosystems and species at risk. For instance, provincial and territorial governments establish and manage parks and marine areas, implement provincial and territorial wildlife and species at risk legislation, and manage forests and other biological resources within provincial and territorial boundaries. Industries that rely on the sustainable management of biological resources are also taking steps to help protect nature. For example, producers of forest and fisheries products can seek third-party certification (such as that of the Canadian Standards Association Sustainable Forest Management System and the Marine Stewardship Council, respectively) to affirm the sustainable management of the resources. The Boreal Leadership Council convenes a range of actors--non-governmental organizations, First Nations, industry, governments, and others--to support conservation and sustainable resource development in Canada's boreal region. Meanwhile, individuals also play a role by responsibly enjoying Canada's protected areas and complying with species at risk legislation. At the international level, the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (UNCBD) is a key multilateral environmental agreement intended to conserve biological diversity. Current initiatives under the UNCBD include the Aichi Biodiversity Targets, intended to help monitor global progress on biodiversity and support member countries' efforts to implement their own biodiversity monitoring frameworks.

What the federal government is doing

Figure 10 - Theme III. Protecting nature and Canadians

This figure shows the structure of Theme 3, which includes two goals and twelve targets (long description is located below the image).Target 5.4: Sustainable AgricultureTarget 5.3: Sustainable Forest ManagementTarget 5.2: Sustainable AquacultureTarget 5.1: Sustainable FisheriesTargets to Support Sustainable Use of Biological ResourcesGoal 5: Biological ResourcesTarget 4.8: Chemicals ManagementTarget 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and EmergenciesTargets to Protect Canadians and their EnvironmentTarget 4.6: Invasive Alien SpeciesTarget 4.5: Marine EcosystemsTarget 4.4: Improving the Health of National ParksTarget 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat StewardshipTarget 4.2: Migratory BirdsTarget 4.1: Species at RiskTargets to Conserve and Restore Ecosystems, Wildlife and HabitatGoal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians

Long description

This figure shows the structure of Theme 3, which includes two goals and twelve targets. Goal 4 (Conserving and restoring ecosystems, wildlife and habitat) is supported by targets to conserve and restore ecosystems, wildlife and habitat (Target 4.1, Species at risk; Target 4.2, Migratory birds; Target 4.3, Terrestrial ecosystems and habitat stewardship; Target 4.4, Improving the health of national parks; Target 4.5, Marine ecosystems; and Target 4.6, Invasive alien species) and targets to protect Canadians and their environment (Target 4.7, Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies; and Target 4.8, Chemicals management). Goal 5 (Biological resources) is supported by four targets: Target 5.1, Sustainable fisheries; Target 5.2, Sustainable aquaculture; Target 5.3, Sustainable forest management; and Target 5.4, Sustainable agriculture.

Two goals are in place under this theme – one aimed at conserving and restoring ecosystems, wildlife and habitat, and protecting Canadians (supported by targets that address, for example, species at risk, migratory birds, alien invasive species, and chemicals management); and one that supports the sustainable use of biological resources (with targets that promote sustainable fisheries, aquaculture, forest management, and agriculture). FSDS targets on species at risk, federal protected areas (terrestrial ecosystems and habitat stewardship, and marine ecosystems), invasive alien species, sustainable aquaculture, and sustainable agriculture are aligned with Canada's proposed 2020 Biodiversity Targets. Additional federal actions to advance conservation objectives and the sustainable use of resources are intended to be developed under a National Conservation Plan (NCP), which will build on existing successes and encourage innovative approaches to conservation. The NCP is expected to include activities undertaken by governments, conservation organizations, industry, Aboriginal groups and other components of Canadian society.

Social and economic dimensions

Implementation strategies related to chemicals management (Target 4.8) are important to human health and the environment, helping to reduce threats to Canadians and their environment from the negative impacts that can result from exposure to harmful substances. Implementation strategies related to environmental disasters, incidents, and emergencies (Target 4.7) have social and economic benefits by contributing to the safety of Canadians, property, and infrastructure. Those that help conserve biological resources (implementation strategies under Targets 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, and 5.4) provide economic benefits by ensuring the sustainability of four vital industries – fisheries, aquaculture, forestry, and agriculture.

Goal 4: Conserving and restoring ecosystems, wildlife and habitat, and protecting Canadians
Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

Indicators:

Figure 11 - Goal 4: Conserving and restoring ecosystems, wildlife and habitat, and protecting Canadians

This figure shows Goal 4 in the context of Theme 3 (long description is located below the image).Target 4.8: Chemicals ManagementTarget 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and EmergenciesTargets to Protect Canadians and their EnvironmentTarget 4.6: Invasive Alien SpeciesTarget 4.5: Marine EcosystemsTarget 4.4: Improving the Health of National ParksTarget 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat StewardshipTarget 4.2: Migratory BirdsTarget 4.1: Species at RiskTargets to Conserve and Restore Ecosystems, Wildlife and HabitatGoal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians

Long description

This figure shows Goal 4 (Conserving and restoring ecosystems, wildlife and habitat, and protecting Canadians) in the context of Theme 3. Goal 4 is supported by targets to conserve and restore ecosystems, wildlife and habitat (Target 4.1, Species at risk; Target 4.2, Migratory birds; Target 4.3, Terrestrial ecosystems and habitat stewardship; Target 4.4, Improving the health of national parks; Target 4.5, Marine ecosystems; and Target 4.6, Invasive alien species) and targets to protect Canadians and their environment (Target 4.7, Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies; and Target 4.8, Chemicals management).

To achieve this goal, the Government of Canada will:

  • Manage, enhance, and expand Canada’s network of protected areas, including national parks, national wildlife areas, marine protected areas, national marine conservation areas, migratory bird sanctuaries and marine wildlife areas. This will include, for example, efforts to increase the ecological integrity of protected areas, improve the condition of ecosystems, establish new protected areas, and adopt integrated management approaches for ocean activities.
  • Reduce risks and impacts to human health and the environment posed by releases of harmful substances. This will include, for example, completing remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites; completing assessment of 1,500 existing commercial substances identified under the Chemicals Management Plan and initiating action to manage risks where required; and addressing new chemical substances to determine if they may pose risks to human health and the environment.

Targets to conserve and restore ecosystems, wildlife and habitat

Target 4.1: Species at risk
By 2020, populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans.

(Minister of the Environment)

Indicator:

Implementation strategies

Leading by example
  • 4.1.1. Commit to collaborating and consulting with Species at Risk Act competent departments for the development of recovery strategies, action plans and management plans for species at risk on DND lands. (DND)
Enabling capacity
  • 4.1.2. Work with the U.S.and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to strengthen wildlife enforcement. (EC)
  • 4.1.3. Support the development of Aboriginal knowledge and expertise in dealing with species at risk, so that Aboriginal peoples can actively participate in the conservation and recovery of listed species and protect and recover critical habitat or habitat important for species at risk on First Nations reserves or on land and waters traditionally used by Aboriginal peoples. (EC)
  • 4.1.4. Engage Canadians in conservation actions to conserve biodiversity through protecting or conserving habitats for species at risk by promoting the participation of local communities to help with the recovery of species at risk, and prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern to meet regional and national priorities. (EC)
  • 4.1.5. Continue to lead and cooperate under the National Recovery Program (RENEW) with provinces and territories, consistent with the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk. (EC)
Demanding performance
  • 4.1.6. Fulfill the federal government's obligations under the Species at Risk Act to evaluate populations and to add, reclassify or remove species listed under the Act and plan for their recovery. This includes the general administration of the Act (including an annual report to Parliament, issuance of permits under the Act, support for the National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk and the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, and maintenance of a public registry). (EC)
  • 4.1.7. Fulfill Canada's obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora through the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act by helping to ensure that the status of no species is threatened by international trade. (EC)
  • 4.1.8. Enhance the implementation of Species at Risk Act within DFO and EC to protect and recover species at risk relative to their respective mandates by preparing recovery strategies, and management and action plans as applicable. (DFO, EC)
  • 4.1.9. Develop action plans for all protected heritage areas with five or more species at risk by March 2016. (PC)

Target 4.2: Migratory birds
Improve the proportion of migratory bird species that meet their population goals.Footnote2

(Minister of the Environment)

Indicator:

  • Proportion of species that are within acceptable bounds of their population goals

Implementation strategies

Demanding performance
  • 4.2.1. Fulfill Canada's obligations under the Migratory Bird Convention of 1916 between Canada and the U.S. as implemented in Canada under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. This includes conserving populations, individual birds, their nests, and important bird habitat through continued conservation actions, stewardship, policy development, and enforcement of the Act and its regulations. (EC)
  • 4.2.2. Complete and make publicly available each of the 25 Bird Conservation Region Strategies, and ensure that recommended actions from these strategies are implemented for priority migratory bird species. (EC)

Target 4.3: Terrestrial ecosystems and habitat stewardship
Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.

(Minister of the Environment)

Indicators:

Habitat conserved indicators:

Implementation strategies

Leading by example
  • 4.3.1. Lead Canada's implementation of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity with stakeholders, provincial governments and other federal government departments and represent Canada's domestic interests in other international fora (e.g., Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-Sharing, Liability and Redress under the Biosafety Protocol; Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna under the Arctic Council). (EC)
  • 4.3.2. Serve as Canadian lead and national focal point for the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). (EC)
Enabling capacity
  • 4.3.3. Enhance and promote enforcement in Environment Canada Protected Areas (Migratory Bird Sanctuaries and National Wildlife Areas) through a contingent of enforcement officers and take appropriate enforcement measures against alleged offenders. (EC)
  • 4.3.4. Provide for the protection of priority habitats required for the conservation of migratory birds and species at risk, as well as unique and rare habitats, by managing a network of National Wildlife Areas, Migratory Bird Sanctuaries and Marine Wildlife Areas that is planned to adapt to ecological change; administering the Ecological Gifts Program; contributing to the development and implementation of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan; administering permits; and entering partnership arrangements (including collaboration with Aboriginal groups, other wildlife management agencies, other natural resource agencies, non-governmental organizations, private property owners, and other jurisdictions). (EC)
  • 4.3.5. Implement the Inuit Impact and Benefits Agreement, and continue to work with the Government of the Northwest Territories (NWT) on the NWT Protected Areas Strategy, with the objective of establishing additional protected areas in NWT and Nunavut. (EC)
  • 4.3.6. Maintain the incentives for the protection of Canada's ecologically sensitive land, including habitat used by species at risk, through ongoing tax assistance for donations of ecologically sensitive land under the Ecological Gifts Program. (FIN)
  • 4.3.7. Work with the U.S. and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to foster conservation. (EC)
Advancing knowledge and communication
  • 4.3.8. Provide scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision makers, and develop and apply models for social, cultural and economic valuation of ecosystem services to support sustainable development decision making so that ecosystem information and environmental effects of development proposals can be factored into decisions. (EC, IC, StatCan)
  • 4.3.9. Support research efforts to develop and apply models for economic valuation of natural capital to improve the understanding of natural capital productivity and productivity in general in Canada and to support sustainable development decision making. (IC)
  • 4.3.10. Conduct biodiversity contaminants monitoring as part of the Joint Oil Sands Monitoring Implementation Plan in order to provide an improved understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of oil sands development. (EC)
  • 4.3.11. Develop an inventory of protected spaces that includes private conservation areas. (EC)
Demanding performance
  • 4.3.12. Participate in implementing the North American Waterfowl Management Plan which aims to conserve wetlands in order to benefit waterfowl in North America. Canada has committed to promoting the wise use of wetlands and maintaining the ecological character of designated Wetlands of International Importance under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention). (EC)
  • 4.3.13. Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national parks in one unrepresented region. (PC)
  • 4.3.14. Increase the number of represented terrestrial natural regions from 28 in March 2012 to 30 of 39 by March 2015. (PC)

Target 4.4: Improving the health of national parks
Improve the condition of at least one ecological integrity indicator in 20 national parks by 2015.

(Minister of the Environment)

Indicator:

Implementation strategy

Demanding performance
  • 4.4.1. 80% of active management targets to improve ecological integrity are met by March 2015. (PC)

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Target 4.5: Marine ecosystems
By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.

(Minister of Fisheries and Oceans)

Indicator:

  • Percentage of total coastal and marine territory conserved in marine protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures

Implementation strategies

Enabling capacity
  • 4.5.1. Develop a federal-provincial-territorial network of Marine Protected Areas. (DFO)
Advancing knowledge and communication
  • 4.5.2. Adopt integrated management approaches for ocean activities. (DFO)
  • 4.5.3. Identify indicators and develop draft monitoring protocols for existing Marine Protected Areas. (DFO)
  • 4.5.4. Undertake research and provide advice to decision makers on marine ecosystems, including impacts of environmental stressors on migratory birds, species at risk and ecological risks associated with specific high-priority ocean activities. (DFO, EC)
Demanding performance
  • 4.5.5. Make demonstrable progress in protecting ecologically significant marine areas. (DFO)
  • 4.5.6. Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national marine conservation areas in two unrepresented regions. (PC)

Target 4.6: Invasive alien species
By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.

(Minister of the Environment)

Indicators:

  • Number of known new invasive alien species in Canada, by federal regulatory status
  • Percent of federally regulated foreign invasive alien species not established in Canada

Implementation strategies

Leading by example
  • 4.6.1. Coordinate the federal government's response to the 2004 Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada. Implementation is the responsibility of federal science-based and regulatory departments and agencies. (EC)
  • 4.6.2. Implement activities and strategic objectives with a focus on preventing and limiting new invasive species from entering Canada so that entry and the domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented. (CFIA)
Enabling capacity
  • 4.6.3. Help governments, agencies and industry manage risks to natural resource sectors, infrastructure and human health by providing scientific knowledge on forest disturbances, including pests. (NRCan)
  • 4.6.4. Decision makers and legislative authorities have science information and tools to manage aquatic invasive species domestically and internationally. (DFO)
  • 4.6.5. Implement conventions and guidelines of the International Maritime Organization relating to reducing the risk of aquatic species invasions into domestic regulations. (TC)
  • 4.6.6. Implement the vessel-related invasive species provisions of the 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement through policy, regulations, research and enforcement actions. (TC)
  • 4.6.7. Develop and implement a risk analysis framework (i.e., risk assessment, risk management and risk communication) and a pathways approach in regulating invasive alien species in Canada so that entry and the domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented. (CFIA)
Advancing knowledge and communication
  • 4.6.8. Engage in partnerships with provincial governments, industry, and stakeholders in responding to invasive species within Canada in order to increase stakeholder and partner cooperation, stakeholder and partner awareness of plants and plant pests, and compliance with policies and regulations. (CFIA)
Demanding performance
  • 4.6.9. Cooperate with U.S. and international regulators to inspect vessels to ensure compliance with Canadian regulations. (CFIA, TC)
  • 4.6.10. Prevent the introduction and rapid dispersal of invasive species and disease into Canada via land, air and marine ports of entry, thus reducing potential deleterious effects to ecosystems, economies and society. (CBSA, CFIA)
  • 4.6.11. Foster international, national and provincial collaborative arrangements and partnerships with industry to prevent and limit the introduction of invasive species entering Canada. This will increase stakeholder and partner cooperation, stakeholder and partner awareness of plants and plant pests, and compliance with policies and regulations. This will also increase international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species and compliance with policies and regulations, ensuring that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests. (CFIA)

Targets to protect Canadians and their environment

Target 4.7: Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies
Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies are prevented or their impacts mitigated.

(Minister of Public Safety and Minister of the Environment)

Indicators:

  • Percentage of federal institutions evaluated that have assessed and taken actions in their emergency management plan to address risks related to their area of responsibility
  • Number of environmental emergencies at facilities subject to environmental emergency regulations

Implementation strategies

Leading by example
  • 4.7.1. Evaluate, validate and/or identify improvements to the Government of Canada's emergency management plans, procedures and protocols. (PS)
  • 4.7.2. Reinforce the partnerships for national disaster mitigation, while managing the increased costs of disaster recovery. (PS)
  • 4.7.3. Analyze and evaluate federal institutions' emergency management plans to assess if the institutions are identifying risks in their area of responsibility and are developing plans to mitigate the identified risks. (PS)
Advancing knowledge and communication
  • 4.7.4. In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable. (AAFC, AANDC, DFO, EC, HC, IC, NRCan, PC, PS, PWGSC, TC)
  • Specific examples include:
    • Develop spill and dispersion models, analysis methods, fate and behaviour algorithms, measurement and remote sensing capabilities, decontamination protocols, and countermeasures used during incidents. (EC)
    • Reduce the environmental consequences of spills by providing scientific and technical advice on weather, sea state and the behaviour and effects of chemicals, sampling and analysis, countermeasures, sensitivity mapping, trajectory, modelling, and operation of the 24/7 National Environmental Emergencies Centre in Montreal. (EC)
    • Strengthen federal preparedness and response capabilities to radiological and nuclear emergencies by working with federal, provincial and international partners on joint planning, drills and exercises. (HC)
    • Facilitate the restoration and maintenance of telecommunications services during an emergency situation by providing situational awareness and federal representation of the telecommunications stakeholders' interests in efforts such as fuel prioritization, credentialing, public communications, international assistance, and the movement of resources. (IC)
    • Work with the telecommunications sector to ensure the telecommunications needs of first responders are met and to enhance the repair and restoration of affected networks. In times of emergency, the short term capability to facilitate the rapid repair, replacement and expansion of telecommunications systems is Industry Canada's highest priority. (IC)
    • Ensure other levels of government, private sector and professional organizations involved in emergency management in Canada have access to accurate hazard information and hazard mitigation knowledge products for decision making (e.g. in the event of landslides, tsunamis, and radiological and nuclear incidents). (NRCan)
    • Provide equipment and human resources to assist in the response to environmental emergencies. (PC)
    • Improve situation awareness, information sharing, risk assessment, national level planning and whole-of-government coordinated response to events that affect the national interest through the operation of the Government Operations Centre. (PS)
    • In accordance with its transport-related mandated responsibilities, Transport Canada oversees regulatory programs and provides advice related to: preventing incidents; ensuring preparedness and response to incidents; and determining liabilities arising from incidents. Examples of actions include the operation of the 24/7 Canadian Transport Emergency Centre (CANUTEC) and provision of aerial surveillance of marine incidents (National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP)). (TC)
Demanding performance
  • 4.7.5. Prevent emergencies by promoting compliance, track and report number of environmental emergency plans in place as required by the Environmental Emergency Regulations, created pursuant to section 200 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. (EC)
  • 4.7.6. Strengthen pipeline safety as part of the government's plan for Responsible Resource Development by undertaking aggressive measures to increase oil and gas pipeline inspections by 50%, doubling the number of comprehensive audits of pipelines, and implementing monetary penalties for pipeline safety violations. (NEB, NRCan)

Target 4.8: Chemicals management
Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substances.

(Minister of the Environment and Minister of Health)

IndicatorsFootnote3:

Implementation strategies

Leading by example
  • 4.8.1. Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites. (AAFC, AANDC, CSC, DFO, DND, EC, NRC, PC, PWGSC, RCMP, TC)
  • 4.8.2. Guidance and program policies developed by the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan program secretariat and the expert support departments are provided to federal custodians for program implementation activities. (DFO, EC, HC, PWGSC)
Enabling capacity
  • 4.8.3. Percentage of stated objectives to be achieved in international negotiations, which were met or mostly met under the Basel, Rotterdam, Stockholm and Vienna Conventions. (EC)
  • 4.8.4. Continue to co-operate with partners across Canada to implement the Computers for Schools program to divert electronic equipment from landfills thus protecting nature, preventing water pollution and providing economic and social benefits to Canadians. (IC)
Advancing knowledge and communication
  • 4.8.5. Assess 100% of 1,500 targeted existing commercial substances as identified under the Chemicals Management Plan for risks to human health and/or the environment by 2016. (EC, HC)
  • 4.8.6. Track releases of harmful substances under the National Pollutant Release Inventory in accordance with the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. (EC)
  • 4.8.7. The Northern Contaminants Program will continue monitoring contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North. (AANDC)
Demanding performance
  • 4.8.8. Address 100% of new substances, for which Environment Canada has been notified by industry of their intended manufacture or import, to determine if they may pose risks to human health and/or the environment within the timelines in the regulation or established services standards. (EC, HC)
  • 4.8.9. Ensure at least one risk management measure is in place for 100% of substances deemed to be harmful to human health and/or the environment. (EC, HC)
  • 4.8.10. Deliver compliance promotion activities for key regulatory initiatives. (EC)
  • 4.8.11. Prevent unacceptable risk to people and the environment through the regulation of pesticides by initiating 100% of the re-assessments of registered pesticide products identified in the Re-evaluation Initiation Schedule (HC)
  • 4.8.12. Administer the Fisheries Act Pollution Prevention Provisions (FA-PPP) including the development of risk management instruments. (EC)

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Goal 5: Biological resources
Efficient economic and ecological use of resources – Production and consumption of biological resources are sustainable.

Indicators:

Figure 12 - Goal 5: Biological resources

This figure shows Goal 5 in the context of Theme 3 (long description is located below the image).Target 5.4: Sustainable AgricultureTarget 5.3: Sustainable Forest ManagementTarget 5.2: Sustainable AquacultureTarget 5.1: Sustainable FisheriesTargets to Support Sustainable Use of Biological ResourcesGoal 5: Biological Resources

Long description

This figure shows Goal 5 (Biological resources) in the context of Theme 3. Goal 5 is supported by four targets to support sustainable use of biological resources: Target 5.1, Sustainable fisheries; Target 5.2, Sustainable aquaculture; Target 5.3, Sustainable forest management; and Target 5.4, Sustainable agriculture.

To achieve this goal, the Government of Canada will:

  • Continue to promote the sustainable use of biological resources by means such as preparing science-based management plans for wild fish stocks and developing and disseminating knowledge to promote the sustainable management of Canada's forest ecosystems.
  • Conduct research to better understand Canadian bioresources and conserve their genetic diversity. Understanding Canadian bioresources and protecting and conserving their genetic diversity is a key research priority of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Notably, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada maintains the National Biological Collections, which include the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes; the National Mycological Herbarium; the Canadian Collection of Fungal Cultures; AAFC National Collection of Vascular Plants; Plant Gene Resources of Canada; and Canadian Animal Genetic Resources. The information contained in the Collections enables research by federal scientists and the broader scientific community that benefits areas such as economy and trade, food and agriculture, public health and safety, monitoring of invasive alien species and national security. The Collections are also the foundation for essential research and development activities to help the agricultural sector adapt to changes resulting from natural challenges, such as climate and pests.

Targets to support sustainable use of biological resources

Target 5.1: Sustainable fisheries
Improve the management and conservation of major stocks.

(Minister of Fisheries and Oceans)

Indicator:

Implementation strategies

Enabling capacity
  • 5.1.1. Deliver an integrated fisheries program that is credible, science-based, affordable, effective and contributes to sustainable wealth for Canadians. (DFO)
Advancing knowledge and communication
  • 5.1.2. Undertake research to improve understanding of marine ecosystems. (DFO)
  • 5.1.3. Increase knowledge of fisheries resources, their productivity and the ecosystem factors affecting them. (DFO)

Target 5.2: Sustainable aquaculture
By 2020, all aquaculture in Canada is managed under a science-based regime that promotes the sustainable use of aquatic resources (including marine, freshwater, and land based) in ways that conserve biodiversity.

(Minister of Fisheries and Oceans)

Indicator:

  • Aquaculture under a science framework: the extent to which aquaculture is managed under a science-based environmental regulatory framework

Implementation strategies

Enabling capacity
  • 5.2.1. Deliver an efficient federal-provincial aquaculture regulatory management regime that is developed consistent with regulatory best practices. (DFO)
Advancing knowledge and communication
  • 5.2.2. Develop and release reporting to Canadians on aquaculture sustainability. (DFO)
Demanding performance
  • 5.2.3. Increase the science knowledge base needed to support informed ecosystem-based environmental regulation and decision making, especially that of regulatory-based programs such as Aquaculture Management. (DFO)

Target 5.3: Sustainable forest management
Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, continued progress is made on the sustainable management of Canada's forests.

(Minister of Natural Resources)

Indicator:

  • Representation of the Canadian Forest Service on advisory boards or committees involving governments, industry and non-governmental organizations in order to provide scientific knowledge on forest ecosystems

Implementation strategy

Advancingk knowledge and communication
  • 5.3.1. Provide scientific knowledge of Canada's forest ecosystems to industry and non-governmental organizations, with the view of enabling the establishment of practices to mitigate the environmental impact of natural resource development. (NRCan)

Target 5.4: Sustainable Agriculture
By 2020, agricultural working landscapes provide a stable or improved level of biodiversity and habitat capacity.

(Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada)

Indicators:

  • Wildlife habitat capacity on farmland
  • Environmental farm planning on agricultural land

Implementation strategies

Advancing knowledge and communication
  • 5.4.1. Assess broad-scale trends in the capacity of the Canadian agricultural landscape to provide suitable habitat for populations of terrestrial vertebrates. (AAFC)
  • 5.4.2. Increase the awareness and adoption of sustainable agriculture practices that maintain or improve the quality of soil, water, air and biodiversity at farm and landscape levels by increasing the number of farms with an Environmental Farm Plan through Growing Forward 2 programs delivered by provinces and territories. (AAFC)

Footnotes

Footnote 2

Population goals are being finalized in 2013 with provinces and territories.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Due to the long term nature of the Chemical Management Plan (CMP) and the range of substances being addressed, it is not possible to indicate quantitative progress toward Target 4.8 within the time frame of FSDS 2013–2016. Approaches for reporting progress will continue to evolve over the duration of the CMP as trends are identified.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Note that the target for hexavalent chromium has been achieved and therefore is not listed as a part of this indicator.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Provinces are responsible for the management of forests. The federal government collates and analyzes the data provided by provinces and making it available to the public.

Return to footnote 5 referrer


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