One-year worldwide hunting ban for convicted offender

Calgary, Alberta – November 18, 2016 – Environment and Climate Change Canada

On June 13, 2016, Jason John Clemett (of Calgary) was found guilty, in the Provincial Court of Alberta, of illegally importing into Canada the carcass of an Alaskan brown bear. During sentencing on October 28, Clemett was ordered to pay a penalty of $13,500 for violating the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act (WAPPRIITA). Of this penalty, $12,150 will be directed to the Environmental Damages Fund (EDF), and $1,350 is a fine payable to the Receiver General. An additional penalty of $1,300 will be paid to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

In addition to the fines, Clemett is prohibited, for a period of two years, from importing and exporting wildlife to and from Canada. The court also imposed on Clemett a one-year prohibition from hunting in or outside Canada, and he is required to forfeit the bear hide and skull.

This case is one of a number of cases initiated as part of Operation Bruin, an extensive, five-year international investigation of the illegal hunting of wildlife in Alaska, British Columbia, and Yukon. Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska wildlife troopers, and Alberta Justice and Solicitor General (Fish and Wildlife) worked together after Alaskan authorities determined that several Alberta hunters were illegally killing brown bears and then importing them into Canada.

Quick facts

  • WAPPRIITA forbids the import, export, and interprovincial transportation of protected species that have been taken illegally in a foreign state. Species such as bears must be accompanied by appropriate documents (i.e. licences and permits). In all cases, WAPPRIITA applies to a plant or an animal, alive or dead, as well as to its parts and any derived products.
  • The EDF is administered by ECCC. Created in 1995, it provides a way to direct funds received as a result of fines, court orders, and voluntary payments to projects that will benefit our natural environment.

Associated link

Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act

Contacts

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Environment and Climate Change Canada
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