1999-Harvey

Legend of sources

Harvey formed in the Gulf of Mexico on September 19, 1999 and grew to a tropical storm with maximum winds of 93 km/h. Harvey became an extratropical depression in the subtropics and entered the CHC Response Zone only as a remnant circulation centre; hence, this part of the storm’s evolution is not contained in the NHC dataset.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Harvey, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone only as a remnant on September 21, 1999.  Eventually it moved closer to the Maritimes and underwent rapid intensification as it transformed into an intense extratropical cyclone. The system tracked in a northeasterly direction making landfall over eastern Nova Scotia and continuing through to Newfoundland, until it passed the Maritimes on September 24, 1999. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 250 millimetres in New Brunswick, 174 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 302 millimetres in Nova Scotia, 40 millimetres in Newfoundland and 76.8 millimetres in Labrador
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Harvey, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone only as a remnant on September 21, 1999. Eventually it moved closer to the Maritimes and underwent rapid intensification as it transformed into an intense extratropical cyclone. The system tracked in a northeasterly direction making landfall over eastern Nova Scotia and continuing through to Newfoundland, until it passed the Maritimes on September 24, 1999. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 250 millimetres in New Brunswick, 174 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 302 millimetres in Nova Scotia, 40 millimetres in Newfoundland and 76.8 millimetres in Labrador

As the remnant centre from Harvey moved close to the Maritimes it underwent rapid intensification as it transformed into an intense extratropical cyclone. The remnant system tracked in a northeasterly direction making landfall over eastern Nova Scotia and continuing through to Newfoundland. Maximum winds of 106 km/h gusting to 128 km/h were reported at Port-aux-Basques. Some areas of southeastern New Brunswick and Northern Nova Scotia received over 250 mm of rain in a 30 hour period. Rainfall in Oxford, Nova Scotia, was 302 mm and 50 to 100 mm in Labrador. Also, winds in excess of 100 km/h were reported over eastern Nova Scotia and western Newfoundland at the height of the storm’s intensification.

Damage due to flooding included streets in nubeing submerged in water numerous places such as: Shelburne, Oxford, and Amherst, Nova Scotia as well as Moncton, New Brunswick. Highways were damaged due to washouts or failure of bridges and culverts. At one time, all roads leading southward from Moncton were closed due to flooding or damage. Damage estimates were several million dollars Canadian. The town of Amherst alone reported damages of nearly $2.5 million. Although no lives were lost, millions of dollars in damage were reported across the Maritimes and Newfoundland.

Post Tropical Storm Harvey started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 34 knots east of storm centre as it tracked north-northeast, south of Nova Scotia. It made landfall east of Halifax and crossed over into Prince Edward Island to position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 34 knots and then turned northeast and made landfall in southwestern Newfoundland and out into the Atlantic by position 3 outlined in brown with winds of 48 knots to the northeast of centre. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 60 knots, with an mslp of 990 millibar
Post Tropical Storm Harvey started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 34 knots east of storm centre as it tracked north-northeast, south of Nova Scotia. It made landfall east of Halifax and crossed over into Prince Edward Island to position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 34 knots and then turned northeast and made landfall in southwestern Newfoundland and out into the Atlantic by position 3 outlined in brown with winds of 48 knots to the northeast of centre. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 60 knots, with an mslp of 990 millibar

Nova Scotia

September 24, 1999

  • An estimated 150 mm of rain fell in Cumberland County and Annapolis Valley (HH)
  • Greenwood received 88.2 mm of rain (HH)
  • South shore and Halifax had between 30 and 43 mm of rain (HH)
  • Widespread flooding, countless road closures and flooded basements throughout the province (HH)
  • Trans Canada eastbound lanes near Springhill were flooded (HH)
  • Flooded Highway 103 near Liverpool (HH)
  • Gaspereau River overflowed and forced the closure of Gaspereau Road west of Grand Pre Road (Wolfville) (HH)
  • Oxford was almost completely underwater as two rivers overflowed their banks (ET)
  • Collapsed bridge on the Wyvern Road near Collingwood (HH)
  • Tractor trailer loaded with lumber went off the road at height of the storm in Maccon (HH)
  • School closes for the afternoon in Amherst and th eUniversity of Windsor gave 5,500 students the afternoon off (HH)
  • Closed South Albion Street, Amherst (a main thoroughfare) because of the sewer backups from the runoff (HH)
  • Amherst switched to backup water supply because the culverts that carry the main water supply were washed out (HH)
  • 1,500 people without power in the Canning area. Power was also lost in Annapolis Valley, Yarmouth, Truro, Westville, Amherst and Stellarton (HH)

September 25, 1999

  • Estimated cost of $3 million to fix Oxford roads (HH)
  • Dozens of homes flooded in Oxford (HH)
  • 70% of Oxford was flooded (HH)
  • Hardware store flooded in Oxford, tens of thousands of dollars in damage (HH)
  • Evacuated 15 homes and 30 seniors from seniors complex in Oxford because of the flooding (HH)
  • Outside Amherst, waters washed away a culvert leaving a 15 m wide by 20 m deep hole in the road (HH)
  • Women rescued by firemen from a van that was swept into the River Philip (HH)

October 25, 1999

  • $25,000 in flood damage to SOS Children’s Village in Margaretsville (HH)

New Brunswick

September 24, 1999

  • Rainfall amounts: Saint John 170 mm, Fredericton 166 mm, Moncton 150 mm, Miramichi 102 mm, Acadian Peninsula 91 mm, St. Stephen 68 mm, Campbellton 48 mm, Bathurst 51 mm, and St. Leonard 31 mm (TJ)
  • Flooded basements and roads in the province (TJ)
  • Closed causeway connecting Moncton and Riverview (TJ)
  • Dieppe called a local state of emergency because many roads were washed away (TJ)
  • Streets flooded in Saint John: McAllister Drive, Rothesay Avenue, Golden Grove Road (TJ)

September 25, 1999

  • 27 homes evacuated from West Brook Circle because of flooding in Moncton (TJ)
  • Millions of dollars of damage in Moncton (TJ)
  • West Main, Mount Royal and Horsman Streets closed due to flooding in Moncton (TJ)
  • Melanson Settlement Road near Fox Creek closed because of flooding (TJ)
  • Pine Glen Road in Riverview closed because of a massive wash out (TJ)
  • Via Rail trains closed because a track was washed out near Memramcook, however the passengers were bussed from Amherst to Moncton (TJ)

September 26, 1999

  • Four seniors were saved by other travellers on Highway 16 in New Brunswick just before their car sank into a ditch during the storm (HH)

PrinceEdward Island

September 24, 1999

  • Gusts of 117 km/h at East Point (G)
  • Charlottetown had 54 mm of rain (G)
  • Prince County had 180 mm of rain (G)
  • Potato fields were swamped, which caused a delay in harvesting. Minimal damage to the potato crops (G)
  • Major flooding in areas of Summerside (G)
  • Greenwood Drive Extension, Harvard, Johnston, Ottawa, Central streets closed in Summerside due to flooding (G)
  • Prevented Northumberland ferry from docking in Prince Edward Island, forcing the ferry to return to Nova Scotia (G)
  • Restrictions were imposed on Confederation Bridge (G)
  • Water came through the telephone and electrical conduit into the mechanical room at Summerside Intermediate School. The power was shut off, however, classes continued (G)

September 25, 1999

  • There was hundreds of thousands of dollars of damage to roads across the province (G)
  • A 55 m bridge in Howlan was washed away (G)

Newfoundland

September 25, 1999

  • Power outages in St. John’s and the Burin Peninsula. 4,500 people without power (ET)
  • Traffic lights damaged in St. John’s (ET)
  • Cracked and uprooted trees across Newfoundland (ET)