1989-Hugo

Legend of sources

Hugo made landfall over Ontario, Quebec and Labrador as a tropical storm with winds of 65 km/h for Ontario and 74 km/h for Quebec and Labrador on September 23.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Hugo, which entered Canada through Ontario on September 23, 1989 and lasted for 15 days. Hugo, tracked through Quebec, Ontario and Newfoundland, before finally diminishing on September 25, 1989. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 113 millimetres in Ontario, 94.8 millimetres in Quebec and 67 millimetres in Labrador
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Hugo, which entered Canada through Ontario on September 23, 1989 and lasted for 15 days. Hugo, tracked through Quebec, Ontario and Newfoundland, before finally diminishing on September 25, 1989. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 113 millimetres in Ontario, 94.8 millimetres in Quebec and 67 millimetres in Labrador

Hurricane Hugo began on September 10, 1989 off the coast of Africa and developed into a category five hurricane. Its winds reached a powerful 259 km/hduring its maximum strength. Hugo entered Canada through Ontario on September 23 at marginal tropical storm strength as it transformed into an extratropical storm. It brought winds of 74 km/h to the CHC Response Zone. Hugo created havoc with power lines, trees, and signs in several eastern provinces. Hurricane Hugo lasted for 15 days before it finally diminished on September 25.

Post Tropical Storm Hugo started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 34 knots as it tracked northeast across Lake Ontario. It then took an east-northeast track along Quebec to position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 34 knots and continues on into Labrador and into the Labrador Sea to position 3 outlined in brown with winds of 34 knots. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 42 knots, with an mslp of 989 millibar
Post Tropical Storm Hugo started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 34 knots as it tracked northeast across Lake Ontario. It then took an east-northeast track along Quebec to position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 34 knots and continues on into Labrador and into the Labrador Sea to position 3 outlined in brown with winds of 34 knots. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 42 knots, with an mslp of 989 millibar

Ontario

September 23, 1989

  • 60–70 km/h winds were felt in the Niagara Falls region (TS)
  • The storm tracked over central Lake Ontario and passed over Kingston and then over Ottawa (TS)
  • 15 neighbourhoods in Toronto were without power during the storm because of fallen wires (TS)
  • A street car’s overhead wires exploded on King Street and Strachan Avenue causing a blackout in the Toronto area (TS)
  • There were also several car accidents throughout Toronto, mostly fender benders (TS)

September 24, 1989

  • Metro Toronto received 47.2 mm of rain on Bloor Street and winds were gusting to 75 km/h (TS)
  • High winds and heavy rain were also present in southern Ontario (ET)

Quebec

September 24, 1989

  • 11 mm of rain fell on the Montreal area and was accompanied with wind gusts of 95 km/h (MG)
  • High winds caused no significant damage to Montreal; however power was lost to some 13,400 homes in the area (MG)
  • In Verdun and West Island, 7,400 customers were without power from midnight till noon due to branches falling on power lines. While in Brossard and Chambly power was lost to 5,000 homes and 1,000 homes in Valleyfield (MG)
  • High winds and heavy rain were reported in the St. Lawrence Valley (ET)

New Brunswick

September 25, 1989

  • 124 km/h winds were recorded in Moncton (TJ)
  • Power outages were reported to about 15,000 customers in New Brunswick. Falling branches and poles caused most of these power failures (TJ)
  • In Saint John and Moncton, trees and signs were blown down, but no serious damage or injuries were reported (TJ)
  • New Brunswick Power reported that 4,000 homes in Fredericton, 3,000 homes in Moncton and Chatham, and 2,000 homes in Sussex were affected by outages (TJ)

September 27, 1989

  • Hugo’s winds hurt New Brunswick apple growers by blowing apples off  the trees. Consequently, those apples lost their value as they could only be used for juice (TJ)

Newfoundland

September 25, 1989

  • Strong winds of 70 km/h were measured in St. John’s during the weekend (ET)
  • Hurricane Hugo passed over Labrador on the weekend resulting in 7 cmof snow falling on Wabush and rain in southern Labrador (ET)