2004-Bonnie

† (1 Canadian fatality)

Legend of sources

Tropical Storm Bonnie originated north of the Yucatan Peninsula in the Gulf of Mexico on August 9th, 2004.  Bonnie intensified to tropical storm strength with maximum winds reaching 101 km/h (55 knots) before making landfall along the Florida panhandle on August 12th. However, the remnants of Tropical Storm Bonnie continued moving northward, over the Appalachian Mountains and developed into an extra-tropical low off the New Jersey coast. The remnant low tracked through the Maritimes where it combined with a mid-altitude weather system approaching from the west. The combined weather system produced heavy rains--with amounts as high as 90 mm (3.5 in) in Edmunston--over northwestern New Brunswick which resulted in flooded basements, drainage backups, and road washouts and closures. One storm-induced traffic fatality was reported from Edmunston, New Brunswick.The CHC issued 5 Hurricane Information Statements.

  • Fredericton received a total of 75 mm (2.95 in) of rain and Edmundston received as much as 90 mm (3.5 in) (TTWS04)
  • The St. John River rose to springtime water levels (TTWS04)
Rainfall image map of Tropical Storm Bonnie, whose remnants tracked through the Maritimes where it combined with a mid-altitude weather system approaching from the west. The combined weather system in Edmunston—over northwestern New Brunswick resulted in severe floods. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 110 millimetres in Quebec, 110 millimetres in New Brunswick and 29.5 millimetres in Prince Edward Island
Rainfall image map of Tropical Storm Bonnie, whose remnants tracked through the Maritimes where it combined with a mid-altitude weather system approaching from the west. The combined weather system in Edmunston--over northwestern New Brunswick resulted in severe floods. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 110 millimetres in Quebec, 110 millimetres in New Brunswick and 29.5 millimetres in Prince Edward Island



Post Tropical Storm Bonnie started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone through Central Maine and into northwest New Brunswick where it moved northeast into Quebec and southern Labrador before dissipating over central Labrador. There were 34 knot winds far east of the track over the eastern Gulf of St. Lawrence. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 35 knots, with an mslp of 1010 millibar
Post Tropical Storm Bonnie started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone through Central Maine and into northwest New Brunswick where it moved northeast into Quebec and southern Labrador before dissipating over central Labrador. There were 34 knot winds far east of the track over the eastern Gulf of St. Lawrence. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 35 knots, with an mslp of 1010 millibar

New Brunswick

August 14, 2004

  • Tropical Storm Bonnie brought heavy rain to the province of New Brunswick causing road closures and flooding (SS)
  • The north-western region of the province was affected most (SS)
  • Edmundston received rainfall totals reaching 80 mm (3.1 in) (CTV)
  • Grand Falls received approximately 35 mm (1.4 in) of rain (SS)
  • Saint Leonard received nearly 35 mm (1.4 in) (SS)
  • In Clair, storm and sanitary sewers were overflowing (SS)
  • Reports of basement flooding along the Edmundston region were numerous (HDN)
  • Route 120 in Baker Brook (between Edmundston and Clair) had sections of the road washed away forcing motorist to take an alternate route (HDN)
  • Flooding occurred in the Iroquois River area (HDN)
  • The Bowater mill was forced to evacuated (G)
  • In Edmundston the St-Jacques area was flooded (G)
  • Riviore-E-al-Truite Rd., Mont Farlagne Rd., Reservoir St., and Demers St. were closed (G)
  • A road located in Clair Industrial Park was flooded (G)
  • Fredericton received 30 mm (1.2 in) of rain (G)
  • St. Stephen received approximately 30 mm (1.2 in) of rain (G)
  • Flood waters in regions of Clair reached 4.5 m (15 ft) deep (G)
  • Firewood, which a resident of Clair had stored away was floating within the flood waters nearby (G)

August 15, 2004

  • A Quebec man was killed when his vehicle overturned while attempting to cross a stream in Baker Brook near Edmundston. The other passenger of the vehicle was able to escape. Heavy rain due to the remnants of Tropical Storm Bonnie are believe to be the cause of the flash flooding in the region (HDN)
  • Madawaska and Restigouche areas of New Brunswick received as much as 70 mm (2.8 in) of rain (HDN)
  • Main roads in the Riviere-Verte area east of Edmundston were washed away by heavy rains (HDN)

August 16, 2004

  • The Second Falls Rd. in St. Joseph-de-Madawaska was closed (TJ)
  • A section of the Rang 8 road was washed away and deemed unsafe for public travel (TJ)

August 17, 2004

  • Severe flooding to potato farms in the Madawaska County region destroyed acre’s of potato crops and brought a potential risk of potato blight  (TJ)
  • The Cote-a-Blanchette and the Chemin des Chalets roadways remained closed due to flooding (TJ)

August 25, 2004

  • The city of Edmundston reported $486,000 in damages to city infrastructure due to Tropical Storm Bonnie. Road network damages contributed to a significant portion of this total value (TJ)

August 31, 2004

  • Areas between Rolling Dam and St. George also experienced flooding (TJ)

October 1, 2004

  • Storm damage was estimated to cost more than $3 million (TJ)

November 16, 2004

  • Association des Sentiers du Nord-Ouest (ASNO) snowmobile trails in Madawaska County were damaged due to flooding (TJ)

November 22, 2004

  • New Brunswick Emergency Measures Office received 51 claims for assistance due to damages caused by Tropical Storm Bonnie (TJ)