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2004-Charley

Legend of sources

Hurricane Charlie developed in the Caribbean Sea on August 9, 2004. Charley intensified into a category-4 hurricane, carrying maximum sustained winds of 231 km/h. After making landfall in Florida, Charley continued along the north east coast of United Stated but weakened significantly. Upon entering the Canadian Response Zone on August 15, Charley was downgraded to tropical storm status as the remnant surface low merged with a frontal system, moving through the Maritimes on August 15, bringing local periods of strong winds (less than 65 km/h) and heavy rains. As a tropical storm, Charley quickly weakened and dissipated later that same day with no substantial effects on Canada apart from a brief interruption in some marine activities. The CHC issued 15 Hurricane Information Statements.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Charlie, which entered the Canadian Response Zone on August 15, 2004, Charley was quickly downgraded to tropical storm status while moving through the Maritimes on August 15, 2004, and Charley dissipated later that same day. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 57.3 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 28.8 millimetres in Newfoundland
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Charlie, which entered the Canadian Response Zone on August 15, 2004, Charley was quickly downgraded to tropical storm status while moving through the Maritimes on August 15, 2004, and Charley dissipated later that same day. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 57.3 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 28.8 millimetres in Newfoundland



Post Tropical Storm Charley started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone along the eastern seaboard directly south of Nova Scotia with 34 knot winds. It then dissipated close to the southern tip of Nova Scotia. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 35 knots, with an mslp of 1018 millibar
Post Tropical Storm Charley started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone along the eastern seaboard directly south of Nova Scotia with 34 knot winds. It then dissipated close to the southern tip of Nova Scotia. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 35 knots, with an mslp of 1018 millibar

New Brunswick

August 16, 2004

  • The remnants of Hurricane Charley forced the Tail Ships Parade to delay their departure from Saint John (TJ)