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1963-Ginny

Legend of sources

Ginny’s path took it almost due north, making landfall at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. This category two hurricane had winds of 176 km/h when it hit on October 29. Ginny then passed over Moncton, New Brunswick and, finally, over northern Prince Edward Island, with category two hurricane winds of 166 km/h. There would not be another category two hurricane to make landfall in Nova Scotia for forty years...until Juan arrived in 2003.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Ginny, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on October 29, 1963, in the morning and made landfall near Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, that afternoon. Ginny then passed over Moncton, New Brunswick and, finally, over northern Prince Edward Island, before dissipating over Northern Quebec on October 31, 1963. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 58 millimetres in Quebec (Gaspé Peninsula), 113 millimetres in New Brunswick, 109.5 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 36.5 millimetres in Labrador
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Ginny, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on October 29, 1963, in the morning and made landfall near Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, that afternoon. Ginny then passed over Moncton, New Brunswick and, finally, over northern Prince Edward Island, before dissipating over Northern Quebec on October 31, 1963. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 58 millimetres in Quebec (Gaspé Peninsula), 113 millimetres in New Brunswick, 109.5 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 36.5 millimetres in Labrador

Ginny formed near the Bahamas on October 16, 1963. Ginny became stronger upon entering the CHC Response Zone on October 29, with winds of 167 km/h, growing to winds of 176 km/h as it entered Canadian waters in the morning and then made landfall near Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, in the afternoon. Winds of 160 km/h were reported in Greenwood, Nova Scotia, and damage throughout the Maritimes was extensive. Millions of dollars worth of damage was done by the wind, rain and snow, but luckily, there were no fatalities. Ginny dissipated over Northern Quebec on October 31.

Hurricane Ginny started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 64 knots and occurred southwest of Nova Scotia heading north-northeast along the coast. It made landfall in the southwestern tip of Nova Scotia at position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 64 knots northeast of storm centre. The storm tracked north through Nova Scotia, edge of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Quebec to position 3 outlined in brown with winds of 34 knots. It continued northward into Labrador before dissipating. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 95 knots, with an mslp of 958 millibar
Hurricane Ginny started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 64 knots and occurred southwest of Nova Scotia heading north-northeast along the coast. It made landfall in the southwestern tip of Nova Scotia at position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 64 knots northeast of storm centre. The storm tracked north through Nova Scotia, edge of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Quebec to position 3 outlined in brown with winds of 34 knots. It continued northward into Labrador before dissipating. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 95 knots, with an mslp of 958 millibar

October 30, 1963

  • Many small buildings were knocked over by the high winds across the Maritimes

Nova Scotia

October 30, 1963

  • Gusts of wind in Truro reached 105 km/h, with sustained winds of 61 km/h (HH)
  • Truro had 55 mm of rain in 24 hours (HH)
  • Trees blew over in Halifax (HH)
  • Moorings broke from boats, forced many boats out to sea in Halifax (HH)
  • Power outages in Halifax and on the Macdonald Bridge caused massive traffic problems since the automatic tollgates would not work (HH)
  • Telephone lines were down in Shelburne and Liverpool (HH)
  • Power outages in Antigonish (HH)
  • A power pole caught fire in Port Williams (HH)
  • A piece of glass blew off the roof of a building at the corner of Barrington and Buckingham Street and landed on a car, which was badly damaged (HH)
  • Sackville River Bridge on Shore Road was closed in Halifax County (HH)
  • Two walls of a shopping centre under construction blew down in Dartmouth (HH)
  • Short circuits set off air raid sirens in some sections of Halifax and Dartmouth (HH)
  • Fire levelled all the farm buildings and a home in Amherst at the height of the storm. Damage estimated to be $50,000 (HH)
  • Main Street in Digby was flooded (HH)
  • Several chimney fires in Digby and Antigonish (HH)
  • A tree fell on a car at Old Barns (HH)
  • Halifax-Dartmouth ferry service stopped (TJ)
  • The Bluenose ferry stayed in Bar Harbour, Maine to wait out the storm instead of travelling back to Yarmouth (TJ)
  • In Lunenburg, some wharfs suffered damage (HH)
  • Several motor boats and a yacht broke their moorings and went ashore in Lunenburg (HH)
  • Twenty Spanish trawlers went to into Halifax harbour for shelter (ET)
  • Freighter lost its mooring and was grounded on rocks near Halifax (ET)

October 31, 1963

  • 160 km/h winds at Greenwood (TJ)
  • Washed an art studio across the road at Peggy’s Cove (HH)
  • Three fishing boats lost in Shelburne (HH)
  • Lost lobster traps in the Bay of Fundy (HH)

New Brunswick

October 30, 1963

  • 85 mm of rain and 139 km/h winds in Saint John (TJ)
  • Power outages and loss of telephone service across New Brunswick, including Saint John and Fredericton (TJ)
  • Reversing Falls Bridge in Saint John began to sway in heavy gusts (HH)
  • Two people were taken to hospital after accidents related to the storm in Fredericton (TJ)
  • Some classes cancelled and several bridges damaged in Kent County (TJ)
  • Many wharfs in the Northumberland Strait were submerged (TJ)
  • In Chatham, a freighter was blown from anchorage to the shore (TJ)
  • All planes were grounded at the Saint John Airport (TJ)
  • At least 50 chimneys blew down in the Saint John area (TJ)
  • Roof fell in on a family of 11 in Saint John; no major injuries (TJ)
  • Boy injured foot in the storm and taken to hospital in Saint John (TJ)
  • Trees were uprooted, a church lost its steeple and houses were damaged (TJ)
  • The ferry service between Digby and Saint John was also cancelled (TJ)

October 31, 1963

  • 30 cm of snow fell from Woodstock to Campbellton (TJ)

PrinceEdward Island

October 30, 1963

  • Power outages across the island
  • Ferry service between Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia was also halted (TJ)
  • Man slipped on wet surface at the Confederation Memorial Site and fell 4.3 m; he did not have serious injuries

Newfoundland

October 30, 1963

  • Heighteen boats went to St. John’s harbour for shelter (ET)
  • The ferry Romeo and Juliet in Newfoundland stopped running (TJ)