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1975-Blanche

Legend of sources

Hurricane Blanche made landfall near Shelburne, Nova Scotia as a category one hurricane on the morning of July 28 with winds of 130 km/h. Blanche also made landfall over Prince Edward Island as a tropical storm with winds of 111 km/h on July 28.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Blanche, which made landfall near Shelburne, Nova Scotia as a category one hurricane on the morning of July 28, 1975 and then moved over Prince Edward Island as a tropical storm on July 28, 1975. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 96.5 millimetres in New Brunswick, 25 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 61 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 37.5 millimetres in Labrador
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Blanche, which made landfall near Shelburne, Nova Scotia as a category one hurricane on the morning of July 28, 1975 and then moved over Prince Edward Island as a tropical storm on July 28, 1975. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 96.5 millimetres in New Brunswick, 25 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 61 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 37.5 millimetres in Labrador

Blanche formed north of the Bahamas on July 24, 1975. The storm grew in intensity to a category one hurricane with winds of 140 km/h. Blanche sustained these storm characteristics upon entering Canadian waters near midnight July 27 and July 28. It then began to transition into an extratropical storm but still packed winds of 130 km/h when it made landfall later that morning over western Nova Scotia. High winds and very heavy rain were associated with Hurricane Blanche in the Maritimes. Power and telephone lines were knocked down, Air Canada cancelled all flights arriving and departing from Prince Edward Island and ferry services were shut down. The storm became extratropical in the Gulf of St. Lawrence on July 28.

  • Estimated damage costs: $6.3 million (CDD)
  • Winds of 115 km/h and 120mm of rain caused major damages and seven fishing boats were damaged (CDD)
Hurricane Blanche started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds between 48 and 64 knots and occurred south of Nova Scotia. It then moved north-northeast to position 2 outlined in yellow, about to make landfall in southern Nova Scotia winds of 48 knots; it then moved through Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island and into the Gulf of St. Lawrence to position 3 outlined in purple with winds of 48 knots east of storm centre. It then made landfall in eastern Quebec to position 4 outlined in brown, with winds of 34 knots east of the track. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 70 knots, with an mslp of 980 millibar
Hurricane Blanche started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds between 48 and 64 knots and occurred south of Nova Scotia. It then moved north-northeast to position 2 outlined in yellow, about to make landfall in southern Nova Scotia winds of 48 knots; it then moved through Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island and into the Gulf of St. Lawrence to position 3 outlined in purple with winds of 48 knots east of storm centre. It then made landfall in eastern Quebec to position 4 outlined in brown, with winds of 34 knots east of the track. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 70 knots, with an mslp of 980 millibar

Nova Scotia

July 29, 1975

  • Winds gusted up to 130 km/h, flattened a half-built slaughterhouse, overturned two mobile homes, snapped trees and downed power lines across Nova Scotia (ET)
  • An oil rig moored in the harbour broke loose, threatened and closed the A. Murray Mackay bridge but ran aground safely just short of the bridge (ET)

July 30, 1975

  • The cost of damage to the power corporation was estimated to be $200,000 in Nova Scotia and affected 500 to 1,000 customers (HH)
  • Telephone communication was heavily disrupted in Nova Scotia (G)

July 31, 1975

  • Halifax measured sustained winds of 83 km/h with gusts to 130 km/h (CHC)
  • Western Head, near Cape Sable had sustained winds of 87 km/h (CHC)
  • All power in Nova Scotia has been restored and clean-up continues (HH)

New Brunswick

  • As the system was becoming extratropical, Grindstone Island in the Bay of Fundy, reported sustained winds of 110 km/h (CHC)

July 29, 1975

  • The greatest accumulation of precipitation was 78mm in Chatham (CHC)

PrinceEdward Island

July 29, 1975

  • All Air Canada flights to and from Charlottetown were cancelled along with ferry service to Nova Scotia (G)

July 30, 1975

  • Telephone communication was disrupted immensely in the province and the Guardian newspaper had production interrupted causing the paper to be delivered late (G)
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