Warning This Web page has been archived on the Web.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived on the Web is for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It has not been altered or updated after the date of archiving. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats on the Contact Us page.

1970-NN-2

Legend of sources

On October 17 at 23:30 UTC, NN-2 crossed over the Avalon Peninsula with winds of 130 km/h classifying it as a category one hurricane.

Rainfall image map of NN-2, which crossed over the Avalon Peninsula On October 17, 1970 at 23:30 UTC, classifying it as a category one hurricane. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 124.5 millimetres in Quebec, 91.5 millimetres in New Brunswick, 58.5 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 99.5 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 62.5 millimetres in Newfoundland
Rainfall image map of NN-2, which crossed over the Avalon Peninsula On October 17, 1970 at 23:30 UTC
, classifying it as a category one hurricane. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 124.5 millimetres in Quebec, 91.5 millimetres in New Brunswick, 58.5 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 99.5 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 62.5 millimetres in Newfoundland

NN-2 developed east of Bermuda on October 14, 1970. Maximum winds produced by NN-2 were 145 km/h. The storm reached hurricane strength and entered the southwestern Grand Banks as a 167 km/h hurricane on the afternoon of October 17 and made landfall on the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland only 6 hours later with winds of 130 km/h. Thousands of dollars in boat, tree and structural damage was reported and winds were clocked at 145 km/h over the Burin Peninsula. The storm dissipated off the northeast coast of Labrador on October 20.

Newfoundland

October 19, 1970

  • 145 km/h winds on the Burin Peninsula (ET)
  • Thousands of dollars in damage on the Burin Peninsula (ET)
  • Windows blown out and trees uprooted across Newfoundland (ET)
  • A house was abandoned in St. John’s for the fear of the roof blowing off (ET)
  • A house under construction blew down in Marystown (ET)
  • Fences and trees were blown down in Burin (ET)
  • Hydro poles caught fire in Burin and Grand Bank (ET)
  • Several fishing dories were sunk or damaged in Grand Bank (ET)
  • Three fishing premises were washed away in Lamaline (ET)
  • A fishing ramp was also washed out to sea in Lourdes Cove (ET)
  • In St. Pierre, France, several homes and a church had their roofs blown off (ET)