1953-Carol

† (1 Canadian fatality)

Legend of sources

Tracking between the United States’ eastern seaboard and Bermuda, Carol made landfall as a category one hurricane in New Brunswick after entering the CHC Response Zone on September 7 at 2130 UTC. Upon making landfall, maximum winds of 120 km/h blew along the southern coast of the province. Carol also made landfall over Quebec and Labrador as a tropical storm with winds of 102 km/h and 93 km/h respectively, on September 8.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Carol, which entered Canadian waters shortly after noon September 7, 1953 and made landfall later that evening in New Brunswick as a marginal category one hurricane. Hurricane Carol diminished on September 9, 1953. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 89.5 millimetres in Ontario, 110 millimetres in Quebec, 62 millimetres in New Brunswick, 44 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 73.5 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 106 millimetres in Labrador
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Carol, which entered Canadian waters shortly after noon September 7, 1953 and made landfall later that evening in New Brunswick as a marginal category one hurricane. Hurricane Carol diminished on September 9, 1953. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 89.5 millimetres in Ontario, 110 millimetres in Quebec, 62 millimetres in New Brunswick, 44 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 73.5 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 106 millimetres in Labrador

Hurricane Carol developed on August 28, 1953, near the Cape Verde Islands. Comprised of winds of 240 km/h, Carol was a category four hurricane. Winds in the CHC Response Zone were recorded as high as 148 km/h. Carol was akm/h hurricane as it entered Canadian waters shortly after noon September 7, and made landfall later that evening in New Brunswick as a marginal category one hurricane. Telephone, power, and telegraph services were interrupted, fishing gear and boats were damaged, several people were injured, and one death was reported. Crops were damaged and trees littered many streets. Hurricane Carol diminished on September 9.

Hurricane Carol started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone along the east coast of the US, southwest of Nova Scotia with 64 knot winds east of storm centre. It tracked north-northeast through the Bay of Fundy and made landfall close to Saint John in New Brunswick and out into the Gulf of St. Lawrence and over Anticosti Island and into eastern Quebec where it dissipated. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 65 knots, with an mslp of 972 millibar
Hurricane Carol started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone along the east coast of the US, southwest of Nova Scotia with 64 knot winds east of storm centre. It tracked north-northeast through the Bay of Fundy and made landfall close to Saint John in New Brunswick and out into the Gulf of St. Lawrence and over Anticosti Island and into eastern Quebec where it dissipated. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 65 knots, with an mslp of 972 millibar

September 8, 1953

  • Spanish and Portuguese fishing vessels took shelter from the Grand Banks before the storm hit (TJ)

September 11, 1953

  • French Luxury liner with 1,075 passengers ran aground in the Bay of Fundy in dense fog. No one was hurt (HH)

Nova Scotia

  • 14,000 m3 (about 6 million board feet) of timber were lost in the province (D)
  • The majority of trees blown down occurred in partially cut areas. There was also minor damage reported to areas of undisturbed forest (D)

September 8, 1953

  • A passenger on the yacht Vagrant lost his life when he slipped off the deck near Cow Bay. Another passenger went in the water to save him but he slipped away. The passenger got back to the boat but was admitted to hospital due to shock (HH,TJ)
  • Halifax had winds of 72 km/h gusting to 105km/h (HH)
  • Dartmouth received 96 km/h winds and trees were blown onto power lines (MG)
  • Winds of 113 km/h off Nova Scotia (G)
  • A 12 m unmanned schooner dragged its anchor and hit the shore in Dartmouth (MG)
  • Telephone, power, and telegraph services were disrupted throughout the Eastern Provinces. Also, Truro, Charlottetown and outskirts of Halifax had power outages (MG)
  • The Dartmouth–Halifax ferry was delayed and trips were taking 20 minutes compared to the regular 10 minutes (TJ)
  • In Halifax, at least 12 glass windows were broken and two warehouse doors were blown away (ET)
  • In Prospect, heavy seas crashed over a wharf and destroyed a garage, flooding over the road and then flooding a field on the other side. Several stagings were swept away with barrels and other fishing gear (ET,HH)
  • The Prince Edward Island–Nova Scotia ferry was tied up during the height of the storm (ET)
  • Three schooners were reported to have dragged their anchors in Shelburne harbour (ET)
  • A two-story house on the corner of Lady Hammond Road and Basin View Drive in Halifax had the roof blown off (HH)
  • The air raid siren on the Roy Building on Barrington Street in Halifax blew off and landed on a crevasse on the roof (HH)
  • The Public Gardens in Halifax had four of the biggest trees snap off and the flower beds were raked to shreds (HH)
  • On the southern coast, fish, houses and staging were swept away (HH)
  • In the Wolfville area, the apple crop damage was estimated at 50%. The peach trees were stripped of their crop and the grain and corn in other areas were flattened or ruined (HH)
  • Stewiacke-Shubenacadie-Alton area power was out for the day (HH)
  • 250,000 barrels worth of apples fell to the ground (ET)
  • The average farmer lost 45% of their crop (ET)
  • Estimates were over $1 million in damages to the apple and farm crops (HH)
  • Had left untold damage in the Annapolis Valley apple orchards and golden grain fields (G)
  • One schooner had rammed a dock, a yacht sunk at a wharf, and four other yachts were aground in Chester (ET)
  • A schooner in Dartmouth was ripped from its anchor and thrown ashore (ET)
  • 22.8 m fishing vessel, Joyce Marie was reported to be sinking off the western part of the province. AUnited States Coast Guard Ship was deployed to rescue the crew (G)
  • Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s (CBC’s) television and radio transmitter in Halifax went off air (TJ)
  • Wires carrying Canadian Press news to newspapers and radio stations were disrupted (TJ)
  • A lady walking along Cornwallis Street in Kentville became entangled in a live wire and suffered burns. She was brought to Blanchard Fraser Memorial Hospital (HH)
  • 22,000 volts of power was directed into a home in Debert when a power cable snapped outside the home (HH)

September 9, 1953

  • A man’s body was found on the shore of Clam Harbour. The man drowned five months ago but his body was never found until it washed ashore yesterday (HH)
  • Winds at Halifax reached 129 km/h (TJ)
  • A man in Chester suffered serious head injuries after being hit in the head by a winch while raising the Starrling yacht from the Chester harbour where she sank during the storm. He was attended to on the scene and then rushed to the Halifax Victoria General Hospital where he suffered a possible fractured skull (HH)
  • A man was taken to hospital after being hit by a wave in Herring Cove. He was washed up, hit a huge boulder, and suffered a concussion (HH)
  • A Liverpool teenager was injured when a falling tree struck him, hurting his shoulder on Mersey Avenue and was taken to Queens County Hospital (HH)
  • The 15.2 m pleasure schooner that ran aground in Mill Cove, Halifax harbour was a complete loss (TJ)
  • 40 power breaks in Halifax alone (TJ)
  • In Dartmouth, light standards at a ball park were blown down (TJ)
  • 11 yachts in Chester harbour sank during the height of the storm. Only the tops of the spars were at the surface of the ocean (HH)
  • On the South Shore 30 poles were blown down and 15 trees were lying across telephone lines in a 16 km stretch (HH)
  • The main building in the Lunenburg County Exhibition was severely damaged when the metal roof 9.8 by 4.8 m was blown off. It ended up 90 m away against a wire fence. The two rear doors were bent at the middle by the winds (HH)
  • The Junior/Senior School in Liverpool also suffered heavy damage and a tree crashed through Milford’s garage (HH)
  • A power line in Yarmouth fell on a station wagon while a man was driving. The live wire sent sparks everywhere, but he was unhurt (HH)
  • Amherst, Cumberland County grain crop was hard hit by the high winds and rain, which flattened the crop (HH)
  • Berwick was the hardest hit with over 100 telephones out of service (HH)
  • 33% of the apple crop was destroyed (HH)
  • 45% of 1.5 million bushels of apple crop was on the ground in Annapolis Valley. This loss alone would almost reach $1 million (TJ)

New Brunswick

September 8, 1953

  • Winds in Saint John were 72 km/h and rains cancelled Labor Day celebrations and activities (TJ)
  • Fringe winds that tossed down trees, cut telephone, and power lines (G)
  • Moncton streets flooded with 0.9–1.2 m of water when their sewers became plugged (G)
  • The Prince Edward Island–New Brunswick ferry was tied up during the height of the storm (ET)

PrinceEdward Island

September 8, 1953

  • In Charlottetown, there was minor damage to trees (MG)
  • Winds tossed down trees, cut telephone and power lines (G)
  • The Prince Edward Island–New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island–Nova Scotia ferries were both tied up during the height of the storm (ET)
  • The ferry between Borden and Cape Tormentine was delayed, and the Wood Island and Caribou missed one trip (G)
  • Roofs were blown off, and a chimney was toppled over from a residences home. Bricks were left all across the lawn (G)
  • Large trees were uprooted in Kings Square, near Lennox Hotel on Water Street and on Kent Street (G)

Quebec

September 8, 1953

  • Hurricane Carol’s rainy weather caused a search for a plane crash in Northern Quebec to be cancelled for the day. The hurricane was not the cause of the crash (TJ)