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2001-Noel

Legend of sources

Hurricane Noel began on November 4, 2001 in the mid-Atlantic Ocean. Bringing winds of 120 km/h (65 knots), Noel was classified as a category one hurricane. It entered the CHC Response Zone on November 5th at its maximum strength but then weakened before entering Canadian waters near noon on the 6th. Maximum wind speeds while in Canadian waters were estimated at 93 km/h. The high winds and rain caused by Hurricane Noel created havoc in the Atlantic Provinces. It flooded streets, created power outages, and knocked down trees. Flights and ferry services were also delayed or cancelled. Lasting for only two days, Hurricane Noel dissipated on November 6th. The CHC issued 5 Hurricane Information Statements.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Noel, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on November 5, 2001 at its maximum strength, but then weakened before entering Canadian waters near noon on November 6, 2001. The high winds and rain caused by Hurricane Noel created havoc in the Atlantic Provinces, yet dissipated on November 6, 2001 that very same day. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 43.5 millimetres in Newfoundland
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Noel, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on November 5, 2001 at its maximum strength, but then weakened before entering Canadian waters near noon on November 6, 2001. The high winds and rain caused by Hurricane Noel created havoc in the Atlantic Provinces, yet dissipated on November 6, 2001 that very same day. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 43.5 millimetres in Newfoundland

Tropical Storm Noel started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone tracking north far southeast of Nova Scotia with 48 knot winds. This path continued closer to Newfoundland with 34 knot winds before if dissipated east of the Avalon Peninsula. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 40 knots, with an mslp of 992 millibar
Tropical Storm Noel started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone tracking north far southeast of Nova Scotia with 48 knot winds. This path continued closer to Newfoundland with 34 knot winds before if dissipated east of the Avalon Peninsula. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 40 knots, with an mslp of 992 millibar

Nova Scotia

November 8, 2001

  • Winds were blowing as strong as 119 km/h (64 knots) northern Nova Scotia and Cape Breton (HH)
  • Several flights were cancelled from Halifax International Airport (HH)

November 9, 2001

  • Winds gusted to 125 km/h (67 knots) off Cape George in Guysborough County (HH)
  • Pleasant Bay received winds as high as 115 km/h (62 knots) (HH)
  • Winds at 130 km/h (70 knots) at Canso combined with the heavy seas ripped large pieces out of the causeway (ET)
  • Winds up to 150 km/h (81 knots) knocked down power lines and trees, and damaged causeways (ET)
  • 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) of rain fell in Inverness County causing flooding, damaging wharfs and battering vessels (HH)
  • 30 mm (1.2 in) of rain fell in many parts of Nova Scotia (ET)
  • Waves were recorded to have reached a height of 8 m (26 ft) in northwest Nova Scotia (HH)
  • The Canso causeway was also closed due to 9 m (29 ft) waves (ET)
  • In Abercombie, a town near New Glasgow a shed was being blown down a road (HH)
  • In Pictou, a steel roof was blown off a mini-mall (HH)
  • A transport truck was blown over near the Canso causeway (ET)
  • About 70,000 homes were without power in Nova Scotia (ET)

PrinceEdward Island

November 8, 2001

  • Winds were blowing as strong as 119 km/h (64 knots) in Prince Edward Island (HH)
  • Boats in Prince Edward Island were swamped (HH)

November 9, 2001

  • Winds of 145 km/h (78 knots) pounded the islands north shore (ET)
  • Winds gusted to 155 km/h (84 knots) on Confederation Bridge causing it to close for four hours (ET)
  • Bridges in Margaree Harbour and French Chapel were blocked and flooded (ET)
  • Prince Edward Island was lashed by high storm surges. It submerged some wharfs and coastal roads (ET)

New Brunswick

November 9, 2001

  • About 20 mm (0.8 in) of rain fell in New Brunswick (ET)
  • About 40,000 homes were without power in the Fredericton area (ET)

Newfoundland

November 8, 2001

  • Winds gusted to 110 km/h (59 knots) (ET)
  • High winds blew out windows from eight cars at a high school in Mount Pearl (ET)
  • The storm forced Marine Atlantic to cancel its ferry service and flights at St. John’s International Airport were delayed (ET)
  • A roof was blown off a transport truck near the Canso crossing (ET)
  • The high winds tore four metal panels about 1.5 by 3 m (5 by 10 ft) from an overhead walkway connecting the Aquarena and the Memorial University’s Field House (ET)
  • The Aquarena in St. John’s was shutdown (ET)
  • Westerland Road was also closed in St. John’s (ET)

November 9, 2001

  • Environment Canada’s monitoring equipment in Holyrood had its dome blown off by the high winds (ET)