1998-Bonnie

Legend of sources

Bonnie originated east of the Lesser Antilles on August 19, 1998 and developed into a category three hurricane. Its winds reached a maximum of 185 km/h. Bonnie entered the CHC Response Zone on August 29, moving into Canadian waters near noon. However, it had weakened to a tropical storm with winds of 83 km/h. Much of Bonnie’s rain fell to the east of the track, which was out over the ocean. However, high winds and heavy seas were reported it several areas. The East Scotian Slope buoy reported speeds of 93 with gusts to 115 km/h. The maximum speed over land was a gust of 102 km/h over the Cape Breton Highlands. Significant wave heights, reported to the right of track, were in the 7 to 11 m range. The maximum wave heights were between 14 and 18 m. Rainfall amounts over land were in the 15 to 25 mm range for Nova Scotia. Radar reports, however, indicated heavier rainfall just off the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia. Further offshore, at Sable Island, 33 mm were reported. Effects on land for Newfoundland were minimal as most of the precipitation and strong winds remained offshore. Bonnie moved outside the CHC Response Zone on August 31 and dissipated on the same day. The CHC issued 26 Hurricane Information Statements.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Bonnie, which entered the CHC Response Zone on August 29, 1998 moving into Canadian waters near noon as a tropical storm. Bonnie moved outside the CHC Response Zone on August 31, 1998 and dissipated on the same day. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 33 millimetres in Nova Scotia (Sable Island)
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Bonnie, which entered the CHC Response Zone on August 29, 1998 moving into Canadian waters near noon as a tropical storm. Bonnie moved outside the CHC Response Zone on August 31, 1998 and dissipated on the same day. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 33 millimetres in Nova Scotia (Sable Island)

Tropical Storm Bonnie started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone along the eastern seaboard in a north east direction with 34 knot winds. The storm continued to track along south of Nova Scotia and turned to the east just south of Newfoundland. The storm continued east out of the response zone with continued 34 knot winds. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 45 knots, with an mslp of 996 millibar
Tropical Storm Bonnie started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone along the eastern seaboard in a north east direction with 34 knot winds. The storm continued to track along south of Nova Scotia and turned to the east just south of Newfoundland. The storm continued east out of the response zone with continued 34 knot winds. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 45 knots, with an mslp of 996 millibar

Newfoundland

  • Offshore, a maximum wind speed of 75 km/h with gusts of 100 km/h was recorded at the Southwestern Grand Banks buoy. The maximum significant wave height from the same buoy was 14.4 m (CHC)

Nova Scotia

August 30, 1998

  • Wind Gusts of 50–55 km/h in Yarmouth (HH)
  • Winds of 75 km/h in Sheet Harbour (HH)
  • Maximum wind speeds were 55–75 km/h with gusts to 75–93 km/h (CHC)
  • Offshore, a maximum wind speed of 93 km/h with a gust of 115 km/h was recorded at the West Scotian Slope buoy (CHC)
  • On Cape Breton Highlands, a gust of 102 km/h was reported (CHC)
  • 8.1 mm of rain was received in Yarmouth (HH)
  • At Sable Island, 33 mm of rain were reported (CHC)
  • Along the coast, rainfall amounts were 15–25 mm (CHC)
  • Sable Island experienced 6–7 m waves and 100 km/h winds (HH)
  • The highest significant wave height was 10.8 m at the East Scotian Slope buoy. A maximum wave height of 17.9 m was recorded at the Laurentian Fan buoy (CHC)