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1968-Gladys

† (2 Canadian fatalities)

Legend of sources

On the afternoon of October 21, Gladys made landfall along the eastern shore of Nova Scotia with category one hurricane winds of 120 km/h.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Gladys entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on October 20, 1968. Gladys then made landfall just before noon over eastern Nova Scotia on the afternoon of October 21, 1968 and then left the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on October 22, 1968. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 103.5 millimetres in Quebec (Gaspé Peninsula), 128 millimetres in New Brunswick, 126 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 116.5 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 34.5 millimetres in Newfoundland
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Gladys entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on October 20, 1968. Gladys then made landfall just before noon over eastern Nova Scotia on October 21, 1968 and then left the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on October 22, 1968. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 103.5 millimetres in Quebec (Gaspé Peninsula), 128 millimetres in New Brunswick, 126 millimetres in Prince Edward Island, 116.5 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 34.5 millimetres in Newfoundland

Hurricane Gladys started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone along the east coast of the US and tracked northeast while making landfall in Guysborough County, Nova Scotia with 64 knot winds northeast of storm centre. It tracked through the middle of Cape Breton and out to the Canso Strait before dissipating. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 67 knots, with an mslp of 975 millibar
Hurricane Gladys started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone along the east coast of the US and tracked northeast while making landfall in Guysborough County, Nova Scotia with 64 knot winds northeast of storm centre. It tracked through the middle of Cape Breton and out to the Canso Strait before dissipating. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 67 knots, with an mslp of 975 millibar

Gladys formed south of the Greater Antilles on October 13, 1968. It reached category one hurricane status with 140 km/h winds. Gladys became slightly weaker upon entering the CHC Response Zone on October 20. Near midnight, Gladys entered Canadian waters as a marginal hurricane, and made landfall just before noon over eastern Nova Scotia with winds of 120 km/h. One person drowned and another four were injured in Cape Breton. Another man was killed when a tree crashed through the cab of his truck on Prince Edward Island. Flooding occurred throughout New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Gladys turned north northeastward and gradually became extratropical as it merged with a cold front off the coast of Nova Scotia shortly after landfall.

  • One person was killed in Cape Breton (CDD)
  • Rainfall of 45–90 mm caused flooding in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia (CDD)

Nova Scotia

October 22, 1968

  • Up to 70 mm of rain in parts of the province, approximately 50 mm of rain in Cape Breton and the highest wind gust reported was 105 km/h in Sydney (HH)
  • One person was injured in Cape Breton (HH)

New Brunswick

October 22, 1968

  • 3.5 cm of snow fell on Upsalquitch (TJ)
  • More than 105 mm of rain fell in Moncton (TJ)

PrinceEdward Island

October 22, 1968

  • A man was killed when a tree crashed through the cab of his truck on Church Street in Alberton (HH)
  • Gusts of 137 km/h winds in Charlottetown (TJ)
  • Thirty five fishing boats, valued up to $10,000 each, were heavily damaged (G)

October 23, 1968

  • Washouts occurred on the north side of the Kildare Bridge near Alberton and a 60-m section of the outer wharf at Miminegash was washed out (G)
  • O’Leary Elementary School suffered extensive damage from flooding (G)