1954-Edna

† (1 Canadian fatality)

Legend of sources

Edna was a category one hurricane that moved into southwestern New Brunswick at 0030 UTC on September 11. It’s winds measured 120 km/h.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Edna, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on September 8, 1954 Edna and made landfall in New Brunswick late on the September 11, 1954, then weakened over southern Quebec and Labrador before heading out to sea, and exited the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on September 13, 1954, dissipating on September 15, 1954. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 60 millimetres in Ontario, 139.5 millimetres in Quebec (Gaspé Peninsula), 161 millimetres in New Brunswick, 28 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 52 millimetres in Labrador
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Edna, which entered the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on September 8, 1954 Edna and made landfall in New Brunswick late on the September 11, 1954, then weakened over southern Quebec and Labrador before heading out to sea, and exited the Canadian Hurricane Centre Response Zone on September 13, 1954, dissipating on September 15, 1954. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 60 millimetres in Ontario, 139.5 millimetres in Quebec (Gaspé Peninsula), 161 millimetres in New Brunswick, 28 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 52 millimetres in Labrador

Hurricane Edna formed from an easterly wave on the afternoon of September 2, 1954, southeast of Barbados. Edna entered the CHC Response Zone on September 8 and maximum winds recorded for this storm were 194 km/h. Edna made landfall in New Brunswick as a marginal category one hurricane late on the 11, then weakened to tropical storm strength over southern Quebec and Labrador before heading out to sea, and exited the CHC Response Zone on September 13. Winds of up to 160 km/h were reported in Yarmouth and damage was in the millions of dollars across New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Edna was a large sprawling storm that pushed hurricane force gusts across much of Nova Scotia. Only one person died in Nova Scotia, but numerous people were injured. Edna dissipated on September 15.

  • Edna caused damage and flooding (CDD)
  • Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources reported forestry losses of 1.6–1.8 million m3 (about 700–750 million board feet) (D)
  • Total damage in New Brunswick: $1.776 million (CDD)
Edna 54
Edna 54 (place holder until pete writes new titles)

New Brunswick

September 13, 1954

  • Winds up to 120 km/h in New Brunswick and 130 mm of rain (MG)
  • One man severely hurt in New Brunswick (MG)
  • Fireman were injured in New Brunswick (TJ)
  • Power and telephone lines down in the province(MG)
  • Fishing boat lost in Grand Manan (ET)
  • Weirs, breakwaters and lobster pots also lost on Grand Manan, damage valued at $250,000 (ET)
  • Flooded streets in St. Stephen (MG)
  • $100,000 theatre destroyed in McAdam (ET)
  • $100,000 in pulpwood swept out to sea at Dalhousie (ET)
  • Roof blew off a house in Lancaster (TJ)
  • Three families evacuated from their homes in East End Grounds (TJ)
  • Tree on First Street fell on a garage in Saint John (TJ)
  • Falling chimney damaged the 2nd floor of a house on Duke Street in Saint John (TJ)
  • Windows broken all over the city (TJ)
  • Three walls were ripped off a house at McLaren’s beach (TJ)
  • $4,000 boat was lost in Seal Cove (TJ)

September 14, 1954

  • Boat destroyed at Mispec Beach (TJ)

September 15, 1954

  • 55 mm of rain fell in Fredericton (TJ)
  • 400 salmon lost at Dalhousie, resulting in a loss of $10,000 (TJ)

Nova Scotia

  • Majority of the damage occurred between 9:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m. ADT on September 11 and September 12 (D)
  • Maximum 10-minute windspeed was 101 km/h and the maximum gust was 138 km/h at the Dartmouth Naval Station (D)
  • Rainfall was 20 mm on the evening of September 11 and was reported to be moderate to heavy (D)
  • The lowest barometer reading recorded was 985 mb (D)
  • Damage to trees occurred both in undisturbed and partially cut forests. Uprooting of the tree was more common than breaking of the trunk (D)

September 13, 1954

  • One man died after being crushed when his barn collapsed (MG)
  • 95-km/h in Halifax (HH)
  • 160-km/h winds in Yarmouth (MG)
  • One man injured his hands and shoulder while fixing the power lines in Halifax (HH)
  • Damage totalling $6 million in Nova Scotia (HH)
  • Power and telephone lines down and many barns blew away in the province (MG)
  • Fish plants were lifted from their foundations in Nova Scotia (MG)
  • Streets blocked by fallen trees all over the province (HH)
  • Destroyed $3 million worth of the apple crop in the Annapolis Valley (MG)
  • Yarmouth and Kentville declared a state of emergency (MG/HH)
  • 100 troops of the Black Watch Regiment were called to the Annapolis Valley (HH)
  • $100,000 worth of herring fishing equipment was lost at Kelly’s Cove (MG)
  • Hundreds of lobster pots lost at sea from Yarmouth (MG)
  • Damage at the Kelly’s Cove fish plant was$15,000 (MG)
  • 800m of road washed away in Yarmouth (ET)
  • $10,000 of damage to fishing gear in Wedgeport (ET)
  • 11.5m boat wrecked in Yarmouth harbour (ET)
  • 7,500 lbs of live lobster lost in Yarmouth (HH)
  • Braemar Lodge in Yarmouth received$25,000 of damage (MG)
  • Yacht club in Shelburne was destroyed (HH)
  • 41m church steeple fell to the ground in Pictou (MG)
  • Many livestock died in destroyed barns (ET)
  • Roof torn off a Dartmouth molasses factory (ET)
  • In Windsor, a man’s chimney fell on his car, which he had carefully parked away from the trees (ET)
  • 12m high press and radio booth toppled in Halifax (HH)
  • Apartment building roof blew off in Halifax on Connaught Avenue (HH)
  • Private property damage in Kentville was$100,000 (HH)
  • An apartment building under construction in Kentville was totally lost; estimated damage at $20,000 (HH)
  • A chimney fell off the dining hall at Acadia University and fell into the kitchen (HH)
  • Thousands of dollars in damage in the Pictou, Springhill, and Amherst areas (HH)
  • Swamped boats in Armdale Yacht Club (HH)
  • 20 small boats swamped in Halifax’s yacht club (HH)

September 14, 1954

  • Wreck of the United States freighter West Jeffery was washed into the sea from its landmark position off Wedgeport (known as the Hulk) (TJ)

Quebec

September 13, 1954

  • Power outages in Montreal (MG)