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2000-Michael

Legend of sources

Hurricane Michael made landfall in Newfoundland near Harbour Breton on October 19, and transitioned into a post-tropical storm shortly after. Michael crossed the province and turned east, before dissipating at sea on October 20. Maximum sustained wind speeds associated with this category two hurricane were 158 km/h, noted within the CHC Response Zone and at landfall.

Michael began on October 15, 2000 in the Atlantic Ocean east of Florida, tracked northeast, and entered Canadian waters before noon on October 19, as a category one hurricane with winds of 139 km/h. Winds remained at this strength as it made landfall about 60 km west of Harbor Breton, Newfoundland, that evening, near the town of François. There were numerous reports of damage from all parts of Newfoundland.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Michael, which made landfall in Newfoundland near Harbour Breton on October 19, 2000, and transitioned into a post-tropical storm shortly after. Michael crossed the province and turned east, before dissipating at sea on October 20, 2000. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 93 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 75 millimetres in Newfoundland
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Michael, which made landfall in Newfoundland near Harbour Breton on October 19, 2000, and transitioned into a post-tropical storm shortly after. Michael crossed the province and turned east, before dissipating at sea on October 20, 2000. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 93 millimetres in Nova Scotia and 75 millimetres in Newfoundland

Most of the damage, while light, was due to high winds, and was reported from small communities east of where landfall occurred. Damages included: power outages, broken windows, vinyl siding peeled off and shingles torn from roofs. The community of Gaultois, about 60 km east of landfall, appeared to sustain the most damage with dangling power lines, uprooted trees, damaged fences and roofs torn off houses and a hotel. Over water, The Atlantic Elm (a tug) lost its tow with The Portland Star (an unmanned barge) containing 8 000 metric tonnes of cement and 10 000 litres of diesel fuel. It was reported to have sunk in Fortune Bay. Pleasure crafts were also damaged or capsized and ferry service between Newfoundland and Nova Scotia was disrupted. The CHC issued 32 Hurricane Information Statements. The CHC issued 28 Hurricane Information Statements.

Hurricane Michael started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 64 knots as it tracked northeast, southwest of Nova Scotia. It turned north-northeast by position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 64 knots closer to the Nova Scotia coast. It continued north-northeast and made landfall in southern Newfoundland by position 3 outlined in purple with winds of 64 knots southeast of centre. It crossed through Newfoundland and made its way out into the Atlantic by position 4 outlined in brown with 48 knot winds southeast of centre. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 60 knots, with an mslp of 986 millibar
Hurricane Michael started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 64 knots as it tracked northeast, southwest of Nova Scotia. It turned north-northeast by position 2 outlined in yellow with winds of 64 knots closer to the Nova Scotia coast. It continued north-northeast and made landfall in southern Newfoundland by position 3 outlined in purple with winds of 64 knots southeast of centre. It crossed through Newfoundland and made its way out into the Atlantic by position 4 outlined in brown with 48 knot winds southeast of centre. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 60 knots, with an mslp of 986 millibar

Noteworthy: Hurricane Michael was the first tropical cyclone into which Canadian scientists by Environment Canada and the National Research Council flew a research plane.

Some CHC meteorological data with Michael:

  • A peak gust of 172 km/h was reported at St. Lawrence, Newfoundland
  • Sagona Island reported a wind speed of 128 km/h with gusts to 150 km/h
  • Rainfall amounts to the left of track were in the 35–60 mm range with typical amounts of 20–30 mm to the right
  • Englee, on the east side of the Northern Peninsula, reported 77 mm in rain
  • Rainfall of 45–65 mm was also reported over parts of the eastern Maritime Provinces
  • Prior to landfall, significant wave heights were 7–8 m
  • The peak wave height reported was 16.9 m at Banquereau Buoy 44139

Newfoundland

October 20, 2000

  • Winds reported at 160 km/h prior to landfall in Newfoundland, 100 km/h in St. John’s (ET)
  • In Gaultois, a roof was reportedly lifted from a house in 150 km/h winds (ET)
  • Storm ripped siding from the houses in Seal Cove (ET)
  • In St. John’s power and telephone lines downed by the high winds (ET)
  • Ferry service was interrupted (ET)
  • In Fortune Bay, a barge was adrift in the bay (ET)
  • In Corner Brook, a tree fell on a van disrupting power service in the area (ET)
  • In Conception Bay South, a Sobeys store had broken windows because of high winds related to the storm (ET)