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1995-Luis

† (1 Canadian fatality)

Legend of sources

Early in the morning on September 11th, Hurricane Luis tracked over the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland as a strong category one hurricane with winds of 147 km/h (80 knots).

Luis originated in the Cape Verde Islands on August 28, 1995. Luis strengthened to a category four hurricane sustaining maximum winds of 240 km/h (130 knots). Once inside the CHC Response Zone, Luis underwent transformation into a large extratropical storm and weakened to category one winds of 150 km/h (81 knots) prior to making landfall in Newfoundland. One man was killed when a car hit him during the storm.

Rainfall image map of Hurricane Luis, which entered Canadian waters early in the morning on September 11, 1995, Hurricane Luis then tracked over the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland as a strong category one hurricane. Luis dissipated shortly after on September 12, 1995. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 148 millimetres in Newfoundland
Rainfall image map of Hurricane Luis, which entered Canadian waters early in the morning on September 11, 1995, Hurricane Luis then tracked over the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland as a strong category one hurricane. Luis dissipated shortly after on September 12, 1995. Maximum provincial rainfalls: 148 millimetres in Newfoundland

Luis was a “well-behaved” storm in that it was well-forecast in the the 3 days prior to making landfall in Newfoundland just after midnight on September 11th. Environment Canada reported that anywhere between 60–120 mm (2.3–4.8 in) of rain fell in eastern Newfoundland and high sea swells were also reported along the south coast of that province. Luis dissipated on September 12, 1995. Wind speed estimates aboard the QE-II luxury liner of the winds prior to landfall indicate a powerful hurricane moved through Canadian waters, however, comparison of ship winds to buoy winds is challenging. Following the anemometer being blown away on the QE-II, the maximum winds were estimated at 241 km/h (130 knots). The CHC issued 13 Hurricane Information Statements.

Historically speaking, one notable aspect of Hurricane Luis was what it taught about ocean waves with hurricanes. Data from the moored-buoy program had yielded some surprising results in two previous storms (the Halloween Storm of 1991 and the March 1993 Storm-of-the-Century); in both cases extreme wave heights of about 100 feet were recorded by the buoys and that data met with mixed acceptance from operational and research meteorologists alike. A Canadian NOMAD buoy once again recorded a similar wave height during the passage of Luis, however, this time there was a “ship of opportunity” in the vicinity which corroborated the data (the QE-II luxury liner). This event provided the validation that meteorologists needed to accept the buoy data and rethink the processes that generate large ocean waves with these types of storms.

  • Estimated damage costs: $1.75 million (CDD)
  • Province received $1.2 million in Disaster Financial Assistance from the federal government for Luis in 1995 and Gabrielle in 2001(CSC)
Hurricane Luis started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 64 knots east of storm centre as it tracked northeast paralleling Nova Scotia. It then made landfall in southern Avalon Peninsula by position 2 outlined in green with winds of 64 knots east of storm centre. It continued out into the Labrador Sea to position 3 outlined in yellow with winds of 64 knots east of centre while continuing out of the response zone. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 65 knots, with an mslp of 964 millibar
Hurricane Luis started tracking in the Canadian Hurricane Centre response zone at position 1 outlined in green, with winds of 64 knots east of storm centre as it tracked northeast paralleling Nova Scotia. It then made landfall in southern Avalon Peninsula by position 2 outlined in green with winds of 64 knots east of storm centre. It continued out into the Labrador Sea to position 3 outlined in yellow with winds of 64 knots east of centre while continuing out of the response zone. As it tracked through Atlantic Canada the storm reached a maximum wind speed of 65 knots, with an mslp of 964 millibar

Nova Scotia

September 11, 1995

  • Swells of 3–4 m (10–13 ft) along the coast (ET, HH)

Newfoundland

September 12, 1995

  • 73 year old man was killed when he tried to cross the street in poor visibility in Placentia. He was struck by two cars (ET, HH)
  • More than 100 mm (4 in) of rain fell on the Burin Peninsula (ET)
  • Man sues province for $478,000 in property damage (ET)
  • Two bridges washed out near Mortier Bay, roads have washouts 80–200 m (262–656 ft) long in Marystown (ET,HH)

September 13, 1995

  • Cleanup is extensive with roads only being reopened in weeks and schools cancelled due to unsafe roads and bridges in the Marystown area (ET)